The Oxford History of Islam and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $85.00
  • Save: $36.02 (42%)
Only 7 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Oxford History of Isl... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Trade in your item
Get a $4.48
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Oxford History of Islam Hardcover – January 1, 1999


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$48.98
$38.99 $11.44
Paperback
"Please retry"
$99.99
$48.98 FREE Shipping. Only 7 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

The Oxford History of Islam + Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood
Price for both: $56.86

One of these items ships sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 749 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1ST edition (1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0195107993
  • ISBN-13: 978-0195107999
  • Product Dimensions: 10.3 x 8 x 1.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #154,961 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

The entire history of Islamic civilization is, of course, too much to cover in a single volume, but John Esposito comes close. In a book topping 700 pages and containing over 300 photographs, Esposito brings together experts in fields such as early Islamic history, art and architecture, science and medicine, Islam in Africa and Southeast Asia, and contemporary Islam. Beginners will be swimming in new discoveries, while old hands will find connections and facts they never suspected. Majid Fakhry, for instance, shows not only the influence of philosopher Ibn Rushd (Averroes) on European intellectuals but also unveils the claims and counterclaims within Islamic philosophy over time. Dru Gladney takes us on an eye-opening journey through Islamic Central Asia and even China, where the Muslim Hui people are recognized as the country's third-largest minority nationality. And have you ever seen an exquisite mosque with towering spires made entirely of mud-brick, like there are in West Africa? Unfortunately, Esposito apparently couldn't find room here for separate sections on Sufism or Islamic literature, but there are more than enough mosques, paintings, historical maps, and tapestries throughout to keep you turning pages and learning with fascination. --Brian Bruya

From Publishers Weekly

A good introduction to Islamic history is hard to find, and readers interested in the world's second-largest religion can rejoice at finding this one. Esposito, professor of religious studies at Georgetown University, has brought together a fine cadre of scholars for this anthology. Fifteen articles cover almost every subject that might interest a novice in the field: philosophy, science, art, architecture and histories of Islamic empires and civilizations. The art (100 b&w photos and 200 four-color illustrations) comes fast and thick, adding a great deal to the text. A particular virtue of the book is its extension of Islamic history into the present day, with articles focusing on colonialism, American and European Muslims and 20th-century Islamic revivalism. The book is not perfect, of course, and some of its faults are serious. Only one contribution is dedicated to religious belief and practice as such, and it is one of the weaker articles in the collection. Also, although Sufism is of paramount importance in Islamic history, there is no essay dedicated to the mystical branch of Islam, and the activities of Sufi orders form only a part of several of the historical articles. That said, this valuable and near-comprehensive tome would be a welcome addition to many libraries' shelves. (Nov.)
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

More About the Author


John L. Esposito is University Professor of Religion and International Affairs at Georgetown University and Founding Director of the Prince Alwaleed Bin-Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding. He is the editor of The Oxford Encyclopedia of Modern Islam and The Oxford History of Islam, and author of Unholy War, What Everyone Needs to Know about Islam, and many other acclaimed works.

Customer Reviews

As good as the text is, though--and as fun---it's those pictures that make this book superb.
Erica
Overall, great book to start trying to understand one of the world's great religions, especially after September 11.
Mr. James M. McDowell
This style does not allow the history to `come alive' with interesting events and telling incidents.
Arturo del Swego

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

51 of 57 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 21, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I came across this book while browsing in a bricks-and-mortar bookstore, and couldn't put it down. I found the chapter on Muhammad and the founding of Islam quite enlightening, for example, and I thoroughly enjoyed the brilliantly illustrated discussion of arabesques in Islamic art and architecture.
However, I firmly believe the chapter on Islamic mathematics (the work of mathematicians who lived under Islamic rule and wrote in Arabic) is the one jewel that makes the book unique. I would love to find a book that expands that discussion further. I was most intrigued when I read that Arab mathematicians discovered key advances that are usually credited to Viete and Descartes, centuries before these western Europeans lived.
Overall, an excellent--and unusually deep--coffee table book, on a much neglected subject.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
35 of 40 people found the following review helpful By J. A Magill TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 10, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Esposito produces an excellent readable history of Islam and its powerful impacts on Western Civilization. Espositio gathered a large number of scholars, each to produce a different chapter covering issues like math, philosophy, politics, etc. While no single volume could cover so vast a subject, the reader is left with what is almost certainly the best introduction to Islam.
While many people, unfortunately, have bought Karen Armstrong's Short History of Islam, this text is far superior in almost every way. Not only is it more thorough and better written, it also deals with Islam from within as well as from without. Islamic culture is examined not from the perspective of an outsider with rose colored glasses, but from several distinguished and Muslim and non-Muslim scholars with a firm background in the subject.
There is not doubt that no single volume could do all of Islamic history justice. However, this book with its rich photographs and strong prose, is probably as good an introduction as you could get under a single cover.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
33 of 39 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 8, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Dr. Esposito is very fair in his writing, which is why so many people have something to complain about; Esposito is not pro-Anybody, so he offends people who are. This is a good introduction to the history of Islamic Civilization. It's fair and balanced. The lay reader may have difficulty sometimes in separating politics and religion in the world of Islam, but it is equally difficult to separate politics and religion in Christianity and Judaism, even today in some places, and certainly hundreds of years ago. Religion and politics have always mixed until recently -- take the Crusades, the Roman Empire, the Spanish Inquisition, for a few examples. The Muslims may have taken over a huge part of the world, but this is no different from the Roman empire taking over a huge part of the world. The Muslims were generally tolerant rulers.
But it's perfectly true that in the West we haven't had a clear picture of Islamic civilization. Partly it is because of the language. Partly it is because new tall tales were built on old tall tales -- people have always made up nasty stories about their enemies. Even into the 20th century, textbooks on Islam didn't even have their terminology correct. There have been many recent objective scholarly studies on Islam and the way it spread, but one scholar writes that it is still common for people in the West to take it for granted that Islam is a violent religion of the sword. This book represents the newer, more objective studies that work from original research and do not just base the information on the old tall tales.
Stereotypes in the West about Islam are so ingrained that any attempt to set out the facts in a straightforward, unbaised manner, as this book does, are viewed as "whitewashing.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
41 of 49 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 27, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Once again, Professor Esposito has compiled a book rich in information and objective analysis of one of the world's largest religions. At a time when Islam is constantly bombarded with negative stereotypes and disparagement in the media, Esposito provides a clear, cohesive portayal of the past 1400+ years of Islam. This book will easily serve as a definitive reference guide and information resource for Islam by a very reputable author.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
28 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Erica on May 8, 2001
Format: Hardcover
A huge and absolutely beautiful book, so sensitively illustrated that you'll spend hours combing the pictures before you even dip into the text. The many essays detail out the rise of Islam and its accompanying culture, and it's the first general survey I've seen to cover sub-Saharan Africa as well as Eurasia, the Far East, and the Indian sub-continent. As good as the text is, though--and as fun---it's those pictures that make this book superb. From lone minnerets on the Xinjiang plains to the gorgeous mud-brick mosques of Djenné, the architectural dictates of Islam have produced some of the most striking and functional buildings our species has ever come up with. It gives me a great sense of communion with the Moslem world, whatever our ideological differences. The pictures in this Oxford History are sensitive and at times poignant...a close-up of a gorgeous tiled pillar, with the tile flaking off with age, revealing superb brickwork underneath comes to mind.
Those who like me know little of the Moslem world will appreciate the very readable text, with its slightly shaming details (the Moslems came up with the idea of a Hospital/dispensary as an adjunct to the mosque.....and their brilliant textiles were carried off by returning crusaders who had little appreciation for how difficult they were to make!)
As a scholarly text, "The Oxford History of Islam" may indeed have some holes---I wouldn't know. But as an introduction to the addictive beauties of Islamic art, and as an overview of the Moslem explosion throughout the world (including some Eurasian places you've never heard of!) I can't think of a better selection than this. You'll never want to part with it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews