The Oxford Guide to United States Supreme Court Decisions and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$3.99
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction is guaranteed! Tracking number provided with every order. Slight wear on edges and covers; otherwise item is in very good condition.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Oxford Guide to United States Supreme Court Decisions Paperback – March 1, 2001

ISBN-13: 978-0195139242 ISBN-10: 0195139240

Used
Price: $3.99
12 New from $1.81 60 Used from $0.01 1 Collectible from $9.98
Amazon Price New from Used from
eTextbook
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$1.81 $0.01

There is a newer edition of this item:


Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (March 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0195139240
  • ISBN-13: 978-0195139242
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.1 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,381,655 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Kermit L. Hall, Dean of the College of Humanities, Executive Dean of the Colleges of the Arts and Sciences, and Professor of History and Law at Ohio State University, is well versed in American constitutional and legal history, and has a skillful touch when it comes to editing the contributions of well over 100 legal scholars (from attorneys and state supreme court justices to professors of law, political science, constitutional history, and government), producing a reference tome that invites the attention of lay legal beagles, students of American history, and practicing members of the legal profession.

The first 348 pages are devoted to an alphabetically arranged presentation of more than 400 of the Supreme Court's most significant and consequential decisions, from Abington School District v. Schempp (1963, reaffirming that the establishment clause forbids public schools from sponsoring religious prayerful practices) to Zurcher v. "The Stanford Daily" (1978, ruling 5 to 3 that the Palo Alto police had violated neither the First Amendment guarantee of freedom of the press nor the Fourth Amendment protection against unreasonable searches when they obtained a warrant and inspected the offices of Stanford University's student newspaper). Each case synopsis, generally half a page to a full page in length, describes the background incident, the constitutional issues in question, a concise summary of the reasoning behind the majority and dissenting opinions, what the public reaction was, and in what ways that ruling affected future cases and laws.

In addition, there's a glossary of terms, defining general legal concepts such as bail as well as less commonly known practices such as the Bad Tendency Test, an appendix containing the Constitution of the United States, another appendix covering the nominations and succession of Supreme Court justices, and an exhaustively comprehensive topical index. It's a pleasure to see a reference work that so effectively and engagingly treats the major decisions of the Supreme Court from 1789 to present. --Stephanie Gold --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Ohio State dean and history/law professor Hall has assembled a stellar panel of experts to distill the essence of 440 key Supreme Court decisions. The cases are discussed in alphabetical order, with each ruling placed in its historical context. The true value of the book is that the contributors take a case like Brown v. Board of Education and provide a nontechnical, well-written explanation of its significance?and manage to do so in three pages of text. In the case of Brown, the contributor, a University of Chicago law professor, provides fascinating details such as citations from Chief Justice Earl Warren's memoirs on how the decisions were written. In some cases, additional references are cited for further research. The book includes a case index, a topical index, the Constitution of the United States, an appendix listing the Justices, and a glossary of legal terms. An impressive accomplishment, this guide will be invaluable to all students of United States history and will also appeal to sophisticated readers. For all public libraries.?Harry Charles, Attorney at Law, St. Louis
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
10
4 star
3
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 14 customer reviews
Eye-opening, mind-boggling and absolutely fascinating reading.
Angular Velocity
This book is aimed at the legally proficient who needs a quick reference and for the lay legal reader who wants to gain knowledge.
M. Castro
For law students, this is a quick refresher that will definitely prove helpful.
Jeffrey Leeper

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Werner Cohn on February 27, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I found this work fantastically helpful in locating and reading the gist of all the important cases that the Supreme Court has decided. Just a little complaint, however: the index of cases, said to be complete, is not. Loewe v. Lawlor, described on p. 163, for instance, is not listed in the index of cases. Unfortunately, I also found a few other cases which, though treated in the book, are inexplicably missing from this index.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By zonaras on October 7, 2005
Format: Paperback
_The Oxford Guide to United States Supreme Court Decisions_ (Kermit Hall, ed.) is a decent reference source on Supreme Court cases. It contains a fair amount of basic info on the cases it covers, their historical background and how the decisions were reached. The entries in this book are by no means extensive, comprehensive or authoritative. Some of the cases were, disappointingly, covered in far too cursory a manner. I wanted to use this book as a side reference for a Con Law (Separation of Powers and Federalism) class in which I am currently enrolled. It has been of use for understanding some of the more densely written cases (i.e., the ones written by Rehnquist and O'Conner) but I was expecting a book which goes into more detail. Also, the double columns of type, dark colored paper and extremely small font size make reading anything inside somewhat of an unnecessary strain. However, I still recommend this book as a reference for the topic.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Christopher J. Sugar on February 11, 2006
Format: Paperback
This book is perfect if you are interested in important decisions of the Supreme court but do not want to spend hours reading arguments, decisions and dissents in a civics book or findlaw. Oxford explains what happened in the case, why it is important and what the Supreme Court's decision did for American law.

It is small, well bound, and for the price of the paperback it is a valuable ancillary text or primary text for any person who is interested in the law or the history of Supreme court decisions. It even offers a glossary for law jargon, the American constitution and the succession of the justices of the Supreme court.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By John C. Mckee on March 19, 2007
Format: Paperback
As a political scientist, I approached this book with a view towards understanding the social impetus and political environment surrounding a particular court decision. This is an excellent book for such an endeavor. It is probably too superficial for a legal companion but in terms of understanding the issues involved in a case, it is pretty good. Further, the overviews also cite some of the more important precedents cited by the court in a given decison as well as those decisions or statutes overturned in a case.

As an aside, it is interesting to see how decisions are made without the full court. Time and again you see the notation "Justices blank and blank not participating".

John C. McKee
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By FrKurt Messick HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 29, 2005
Format: Paperback
Kermit Hall, editor of the Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States, is also editor of this volume that looks specifically at the cases. This book does have an appendix with basic information such as lists of Justices, but for the most part, this book is really a compilation of short articles that deal with the major cases of the Supreme Court.

This guide contains hundreds of major cases that set important precedents for later courts, lower courts and society at large to follow. From early pivotal cases such as Marbury v. Madison, which set the precedent of judicial supremacy in Constitutional review, to the more recent cases such as Brown v. Board of Education (striking down 'separate but equal' arrangements), Miranda v. Arizona (setting up the popularly-known 'Miranda rights'), and Roe v. Wade. Unfortunately, this book was published before the monumental Bush v. Gore decision (Hall discusses this in his other Oxford Companion) - hopefully it will be included in a later edition. Each decision includes a description of the key issues, the opinion of the court, those who concur, significant dissents and attendant issues that might arise.

This text also includes insights into the significant personalities of the Supreme Court, facts and trivia about the Supreme Court, and more. However, these are interesting incidentals, not detracting from the primary purpose of the text, which is to show the decisions themselves.

The text includes an index of cases as well as an index of topics. This is a very useful text for those who need a quick, ready reference to the cases, particularly student of law, criminal justice, or political science.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By M. A. Krul on July 4, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The "Oxford Guide to US Supreme Court Decisions" is not much more than that. It gives an extremely expansive overview of all US Supreme Court cases that can remotely be considered important, throughout the period of its existence. Every case contains information on the reference number, the composition of the majority, concurrence and dissents, and a summary of what the case or controversy was about by a legal scholar.

The latter are sometimes a little problematic. Many cases are not given more than one or two paragraphs, and the index is incomplete. Some of the writers of the summaries also have a tendency to insinuate their own opinions on the cases into it, which goes particularly for those done by Kermit Hall himself, which are invariably positive about the most progressive justices and generally scathing about Scalia (though this is done in a 'read between the lines' manner, of course). An additional issue is that the index is incomplete, and the promised biographies of all Justices is no more than a list of their dates of nomination, appointment and death, which is rather disappointing.

Still overall, it's an essential reference book for looking up cases and the inclusion of related cases in the case summaries makes it much easier to trace precedent through the decades.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search