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Oz Reimagined: New Tales from the Emerald City and Beyond Kindle Edition

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Length: 365 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Editorial Reviews


"Revisiting L. Frank Baum's Oz with all-new stories, this anthology showcases up-and-coming talents as well as acclaimed writers such as Jane Yolen and Tad Williams. ... This anthology will appeal to Oz lovers looking for new perspectives." -Publishers Weekly

About the Author

John Joseph Adams is the bestselling editor of many anthologies, such as The Mad Scientist’s Guide to World Domination, Epic, Other Worlds Than These, Armored, Under the Moons of Mars: New Adventures on Barsoom, Brave New Worlds, Wastelands, The Living Dead, The Living Dead 2, By Blood We Live, Federations, The Improbable Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, and The Way of the Wizard. Forthcoming work includes Wastelands 2, Dead Man’s Hand, and Robot Uprisings. John is a four-time finalist for the Hugo Award and the World Fantasy Award. He has been called “the reigning king of the anthology world” by Barnes & Noble, and his books have been lauded as some of the best anthologies of all time. In addition to his anthology work, John is also the editor of Lightspeed Magazine and Nightmare Magazine, and he is the co-host of’s The Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy podcast. For more information, visit his website at, and you can find him on Twitter @johnjosephadams.

Douglas Cohen is the former editor of Realms of Fantasy Magazine, where he worked for six-and-a-half years. In the magazine’s final year, they published their 100th issue, won a Nebula Award, and were nominated for a second one. Multiple illustrations he solicited for the magazine have appeared in the prestigious Spectrum Art series. Douglas is also a writer, and his stories have appeared or are forthcoming in Fantastic Stories of the Imagination, Interzone, and Weird Tales. He recently finished writing his first novel. Oz Reimagined marks his first anthology. Find him on Twitter @Douglas_Cohen.

Product Details

  • File Size: 4950 KB
  • Print Length: 365 pages
  • Publisher: 47North (February 26, 2013)
  • Publication Date: February 26, 2013
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B009VJYJ5I
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #301,444 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

115 of 119 people found the following review helpful By Tracy Marks VINE VOICE on February 16, 2013
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Fifty five years ago I discovered over a dozen L. Frank Baum Wizard of Oz sequels on a window shelf of Brockway Memorial Library, in Miami Shores, Florida. Reading each one several times, I delighted not only in the familiar Oz characters but also in the less known ones - Polychrome, Jack Pumpkinhead, the Patchwork Girl, the Nome King who could only be destroyed with eggs.

Understandably, I was thrilled to return to Oz and read contemporary reimaginings of Oz books. But my response to OZ REIMAGINED was mixed. These fifteen stories, all by reputable authors, are inconsistent in quality and tone - ranging from tasteless cyberpunk (with x-rated rape and violence) and sophomoric writing styles to clever, original retellings that are true to the spirit of Baum and his large repertoire of characters.

Here are my brief comments, with my ratings, on each story included in the book:

*THE GREAT ZEPPELIN HEIST OF OZ (Carson and Finlay): How Oscar, the evil Wizard of Oz, first arrived in Oz and gained power. Includes actual Baum characters such as the Winged Monkeys and Patchwork Girl. One of the best stories in the book. FIVE STARS.

EMERALD TO EMERALD, DUST TO DUST (McGuire): Dark urban fantasy. Dorothy is a street-smart, tough Wicked Witch of the West, investigating a murder which occurs in the downtown crime-ridden slums of Oz. No sex scenes, but Dorothy is a lesbian in relationship with Polychrome. Obscene language. THREE STARS.

LOST GIRLS OF OZ (Goss): A journalist investigates the disappearance of girls who have been physically abused, and transported by Ozma and the Wizard to safety in the Emerald City. Dorothy is a general of a girls' army of liberation.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By L. M Young VINE VOICE on February 6, 2013
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
A caveat about this one: don't just recall the Technicolor confection of THE WIZARD OF OZ and the simple childlike innocence of the books. These are stories written for adults and several of them touch on adult themes. In general these are not short stories for children.

Having disposed with the warning, I can't say I am an Oz fanatic. I've read the classic novel and at least one of the sequels, watched the MGM film and Disney's darker sequel, seen an Oz cartoon or two, peeked into Oz via Heinlein, but never have been tempted to dip into the rest of the novels or the Macguire books. But I quite enjoyed this collection, which ranged from stories in the Oz tradition ("The Great Zeppelin Heist of Oz" and, what was my favorite story, "The Cobbler of Oz" about a gentle Winged Monkey child and the cobbler who hopes to make her dreams come true) to a hardboiled version as portrayed in "Emeralds to Emeralds, Dust to Dust." There is also Oz as a video game simulation, or as a tilted world as seen by psychiatric inmates, or as a setup for a reality series; as a training ground for early-20th century suffragettes and even a story of a Chinese Dorothy whose adventures parallel an actual historical event, and another in which the inspiration for Baum's first novel come from the adventures of his eldest son and his slightly eccentric classmate. Not all the tales revolve around Dorothy, either, as evidenced by a bitter story about the lives and fate of "little people" who keep the Emerald City so gleamingly clean.

If you are open-minded enough to approach Oz in tales that are skewed differently from Baum's imaginings, you will find much to enjoy in this collection.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Anne M. Hunter VINE VOICE on February 16, 2013
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
If you want to stay with the canon, re-read the Baum and Ruth Plumly
Thompson Stories -- a megapack of 17 of them is available for a buck
for Kindle.

If you think it would be more fun to read various twists (some
of them quite twisted) on the OZ universe and characters by top Young
Adult and Adult fantasy writers, this is for you. Clearly inspired by
Gregory Maguire's extremely popular book/play "Wicked", which turned
the original Oz story inside out, telling it from the point of view of
an at least partially sympathetic Wicked Witch of the West, this
anthology looks at alternate Ozes from a variety of strange perspectives,
imagining, for example, what happened to Dorothy after Oz, or what
happened to Oz after Dorothy. While some of the stories are indeed
very dark, the original stories had their very dark and disturbing
moments, and were always about Good and Evil, among other things.
These stories explore some of the ultimate meanings of Oz in our
culture very successfully.

I found it a fascinating collection, with amazingly varied stories,
like an Oz that opens up an epoch of modern Chinese history, and a
lovely fantasy about an enchanting and memorable child Winged Monkey.
The Oz as reality series was a hoot. It's a very rich collection.

You won't like all of them, but you may find all of them readable and
worth reading. Which ones you find amazing will depend on your view of Oz.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By ML VINE VOICE on February 5, 2013
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Oz Reimagined is a collection of fifteen original short stories loosely inspired by L. Frank Baum's Wizard of Oz series and/or the 1939 Movie. The list of contributors includes long-established fantasy authors like Tad Williams and Jane Yolen alongside relative newcomers like Seanan McGuire and Rachel Swirsky. The book also features a Forward by Gregory Maguire, the man who set the standard for reimagining Oz with his book "WICKED".

What you need to know about this collection is the following:

1. Nearly half of the stories are retellings of the classic "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz" tale. One is "The Wizard of Oz" in a mental hospital; another is "The Wizard of Oz" in China; another is "The Wizard of Oz" as a "Survivor"-style reality show. The same melody in a different key; the same tune with a different arrangement; Ravel's "Bolero"; Kurasawa's "Roshomon ... or just plain Oz Overload.

2. Some of the authors' takes on Oz are weirder or darker or more-sci-fi-inspired than Maguire's "Wicked" series, but, if you've read Maguire, none will seem especially fresh.

3. This is not a children's book. At least half of the stories are fine for early teens, but unless you think your kid would enjoy a story that puts two mentally ill female lovers, one of whom likes to cut herself, in the roles of Scarecrow and Tin-man, you should exercise discretion.

4. The editors encouraged authors to draw on the written "Oz" canon rather than the film.
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