Industrial-Sized Deals TextBTS15 Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_plcc_6M_fly_beacon Beach House $5 Off Fire TV Stick Grocery Shop Popular Services gotS5 gotS5 gotS5  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage Metal Gear Solid 5 Shop Back to School with Amazon Back to School with Amazon Outdoor Recreation STEM Toys & Games
Passup Point and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

PASSUP POINT Paperback – September 2, 2005

11 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, September 2, 2005
$11.19

Best Books of the Year So Far
Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2015's Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Editorial Reviews

Review

Regarding Passup Point:

I liked the format of this book, the setting out in small and varied chapters allowed the story to flow easily. This novel is a captivating read full of twists and secrets that instantly have your attention from the very first chapter. When Father Jonah Devlin arrives in the fishing village of Passup Point he becomes immediately aware of the wild atmospheric elements. Coming from Boston USA to the deep penetrating cold of this rural community where poverty and despair is rife, Jonah wonders how he can help his congregation. The church is stripped bare and in a state of dilapidation. DIY seems like the only option until Kylie and Jason, two young brothers, offer to help restore the church to its former glory.

Father Jonah seems quite distant and a man of few words when you first get to know him, however his past is not all that it seems. He has found himself banished to this part of the world where, cut off from civilization by it's geographical setting, its residents face a daily battle with the elements. The residents are starved not only of the warming rays from the sun but also of hope for the future. Gradually Jonah gets to know his parishioners and tries to give them the support and comfort he feels they have been deprived of.

Phoebe Slade quite fancies this new priest but she has a decent husband. She takes Jonah under her wing and offers to wash and iron his vestments, as well as inviting him to dinner to meet some residents of Passup Point. The food served however was alien and turned his stomach, consisting of cod's tongue and seal flipper pie.

A lucky escape at Judy's another of his flock was enough to scare him to death and was it possible he stayed the night at Alberta Richards the night of the bad snow?.

Seeking a more comfortable sanctuary, Jonah turns to The Bar and Grille coffee shop which provides the perfect place for meeting more people and it is there he strikes up a friendship with Gabrielle, a young waitress who is struggling to raise her two brothers. She is to figure greatly in the story of Father Jonah.

Stories of the local residents, such as Phoebe and her husband are woven into the plot and create even more depth. I think this part is so cleverly written with a dash of humour too.

Father Jonah had many dreams or recollections of his first assignment after his ordination fifteen years before, where he had been a very successful priest. The Bishop had other ideas for him though after the priest sanctioned a service for gays. A baptism at Passup Point brought back memories of being a Catholic Father but were these genuine memories? In an old newspaper there had been a scandal involving young boys. Father Jonah knows his own sexuality but is unable to ignore the past.

Why has Jonah been exiled to this God forsaken place? Is he really an Anglican priest?

Coralie Hughes Jensen writes about complex characters and situations with her unique ability. These characters become very realistic and colourful as you read more into their lives and problems. The priest's sorrow, anger and frustration are at one with the wild and bleak conditions in this desolate fishing hamlet.

A clever intriguing novel.

Jessica has been a book reviewer for a newspaper and a national women's magazine and is working on a novel. -- BookPleasures.com, review by Jessica Roberts --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 328 pages
  • Publisher: Lulu.com (September 2, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1411641663
  • ISBN-13: 978-1411641662
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.7 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #10,949,102 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Coralie uses her interest in travel to locate her novels in exotic locations. Her first two novels, Passup Point and Lety's Gift were written after she traveled to Newfoundland and Labrador. Her third, a mystery about the olive oil industry called L'Oro Verde, was written after a trip to San Gimignano in Tuscany. The last novel, a historical romantic suspense Winter Harvest, is about a young girl given to the Shakers of western Massachusetts during a recession in the 1800s.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on January 23, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
If you are a believer in Jesus Christ and seek to glorify God with your life, skip reading Passup Point. I decided against finishing it due to the profanity included and the apparent direction the book was going to take involving the priest in lusting after a minor and then fornication with another woman in the community. God does not consider sin entertaining and therefore I am choosing not to finish this trash for entertainment.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By DY Quesco on January 23, 2006
Format: Paperback
Here is a book with great writing: character, plot and setting. The characters are engaging, the setting in Labrador, Canada -- unknown and rich for exploration. The issues: love, isolation and problems with the Church and faith are both contemporary and timeless.

Ms. Jensen is an excellent writer. Her use of language is crisp and literary.

While this book has a religious theme, but it is not preachy or moralistic. There are a couple of sex scenes, but they are not gratuitous, but thrown in for reasons of plot and revealing things about the characters. This book takes adult themes and explores them realistically and with great feeling.

This is a deeply felt and well-observed novel. It is sad that Ms. Jensen had to resort to Lulu.com to publish such a fine book when so many less-deserving novels get published by the big publishing houses every year.

I accidentally gave this book a 4-Star Rating on another site, but it really is a 5-Star book. One you think about after you have read it. It stays with you for awhile.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Armchair Interviews on July 16, 2007
Format: Paperback
Passup Point is a story of new beginnings, secrets and redemption. The author has created characters with real depth and serious obstacles to overcome.

Jonah Devlin is expelled to Passup Point by the archdiocese because in his church in Boston he was too controversial. (He was expelled by the archdioces, and he comes to Passup Point as a minister with no real connection to a specific religion.) The church he comes to hasn't been used in five years and doesn't even have pews anymore. There is lots of work to do in this small fishing village. The people are not used to going to church anymore and a flock needs to be gathered.

Gabrielle Pye is a young woman who has had a hard life. She has raised her two brothers since she was [...] For a while after her mother's death, Gabrielle cashed her mother's social security checks so that they could survive--and the authorities come periodically to try to bring her to justice. The Pye children are very resourceful though and even have a hiding place to avoid being caught.

Jonah tries to stop himself from having feelings for Gabrielle and the whole town but he soon becomes involved in their lives. Several have secrets but all are good people. There are obstacles for him to overcome as well and he tries his hardest not to have his past life interfere with his new life. However a collision of past and present is inevitable.

Passup Point is heartwarming and gives a reader hope that if people work together and help one another, all things are possible--without the story being corny or syrupy.

Armchair Interview says: If you need a "feel-good" boost, check out this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Beleafer on April 9, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I am not Roman Catholic; maybe I would have "gotten" this book more if I were. I really struggled to figure out what this book was all about. At times it seemed like it was supposed to be a story about a priest who struggles to figure out who he is and what he believes after being sent to this little, out of the way place because of some power struggles in the church. But it was so superficial that I couldn't find the struggle. He mentions a couple of times to himself about having a weakness in the area of sexual sin, and then his sexual exploits are described in somewhat graphic detail that glorifies it. Really? If he struggles with it, where's the struggle? His inner turmoil that supposedly led to what the church didn't like was summed up in one sermon. This story could have been so much more. It has a unique setting and some interesting characters but the story falls kind of flat.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Andrejka on September 25, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
I got this book on my Kindle hoping for a solid, Bible based Christian story. Although the story was interesting and the book was easy to read I didn't appreciate some parts of it and some beliefs in the books (f.e. sex outside of marriage). So if you are a feel-good, all-religion-is-good person, you might enjoy it. If you truly believe what the Bible says and try to live what Jesus Christ preached and lived, you won't like it. I was particularly disappointed by the ending, where the main character literally says about two unmarried people living together: "But here in Passup Point, it's not a sin. As long as we love each other, and I have no doubts about that, it's just plain living."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By bdmcdona on October 12, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Might have been better book if it hadn't jumped around with the characters. And definately would have been better without all the sex and affairs and living together. Not advised for Christians who believe in abstinence before marriage. But it was enough to hold your attention to find out what happened in the end.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again