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PEGASUS BRIDGED: JUNE 6, 1944 Mass Market Paperback – 1986


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback
  • Publisher: Pocket Books; Mass Paperback Edition edition (1986)
  • ASIN: B001QYHOPI
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (134 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #12,963,293 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Ambrose does a wonderful job in presenting the story.
Street Glider
Great story of the British glider troups that captured (and then bravely held) the bridge on the eastern edge of D-Day beaches in early hours of June 6, 1944.
Jim Vondracek (jevondracek@ashland.com)
Very riveting, suspenseful well written, well researched.
Greg Wheeler

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

78 of 81 people found the following review helpful By Scott VINE VOICE on February 6, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Stephen Ambrose has done a remarkable job in giving the reader a front row seat to the fighting at Pegasus Bridge. His writing takes you right to the action and flows over into the heat of battle as if you were there at the time of the attack.
He vividy describes the training leading up to the assault on bridge in such detail that you may need to set aside the book to rest, and catch your breath from the rigors of the last double time march.
Even though this aspect of the invasion (Pegasus Bridge) encompasses such a small area, the high level of detailed research lends itself to a wonderful account of the early morning hours of 6 June 1944.
This book is very easy to read and is a must for those intrigued by the battle that took place at this simple stone bridge over the Caen Canal in the Norman countryside.
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35 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Street Glider on April 21, 2002
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Having been stationed in Germany for three years I was fortunate enough to travel to many of the WWII battlegrounds that exist in Europe and the beaches that made up Operation Overlord is one trip that I will never forget. Before making the trip I read "Citizen Soldier," "D-Day" and "Pegasus Bridge" all written by Stephen Ambrose. I carried "D-Day" and "Pegasus Bridge" with me during my trip to use as a reference as I visited 4 of the 5 beaches involved in the D-Day invasion.
"Pegasus Bridge" is the story of the men from D company from the Ox and Bucks Light Infantry Regiment of the British 6th Airborne Division. Ambrose does a masterful job of relating the story of these men and tying to results of the battle to the overall operation of D-Day. Ambrose gives the background on the training of the men, personal insights of many of the men, and the man who held them all together Major John Howard.
As good as Ambrose tells the story of D company nothing compares to actually standing on that bridge and the feeling that you get thinking that right here is where the D-Day invasion began! Ambrose has included some great photos and drawing of the gliders landing site. When you visit the bridge itself you will find markers indicating the locations of the first three gliders and it is only then you will realize what a magnificent job of piloting Staff Sergeant Jim Wallwork did in landing the nose of his glider "to break through the barbed wire" as requested by Major Howard. Some the machine gun nest are still there beside the bridge and gives you an idea of what the men faced. The original bridge, replaced with a modern bridge, but thankfully was saved and is located nearby as part of a museum.
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51 of 54 people found the following review helpful By Michael J. Edelman TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on May 1, 2000
Format: Paperback
If you've seen "The Longest Day" you may recall the scene in which a small band of glider-borne commandos seizes a bridge and defends it until relieved by Lord Lovett and his commandos. What you may not know is that this was a singular event- the very first combat engagement of D-Day and the first and only use of this technique by the Allies in the war.
Ambrose is one of the best contemporary historians to write about World War 2, always managing to be both accurate and entertaining. Here, he gives us profiles of the men involved on both sides of the battle, the development of the glider assault technique, a detailed minute-by-minute account of the fighting, and the story of the aftermath of the battle and the lives of the men (and women) after the war, up to the 50th Anneversary D-Day ceremonies in France.
If you're a history buff, this book is a must-have for your library. If you're interested in a more accurate verison of the details surrounding the battle than the movie presented, read the book. And if you simply want to understand a little better how ordinary men can acheive the extraordinary when called on to do so, read this book.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Maj. R. S. Hagan (umo@sprintmail.com) on March 4, 1998
Format: Paperback
As a military officer I have had the great good fortune to meet the author and two of the protagonists in this account of a pivotal moment in the opening of the Battle of Normandy as well as being fortunate enough to travel to the site of most of the action. While Ambrose captures some of the exuberant personality of Maj John Howard, he most certainly excelled at recounting the herculean efforts leading up to the event -- the training, the organization, the bureaucracy -- and leading the reader through the night of hell endured by the troops on both sides as well as the terrified, suspicious, yet grateful civilians caught in the middle.
What I liked most about the book (being an avid WWII history buff) is the immediacy of Ambrose's writing. When I traveled to Caen and saw the bridge's modern replacement and the adjacent glider landing fields where "Rommel's Asparagus" had been "planted" I knew instantly where I was and where the actions took place. I could easily trace from memory what had happened, to whom, and where. Ambrose has the capacity to make his spare prose come alive and cause the reader to see the panzers lumbering into the targeted intersection, only to be knocked out by a man's phenomenally skillful use of a woefully inaccurate weapon. It's all there in this small, rather inconspicuous book.
I highly recommend this book for anyone who may be interested in learning some detail about what happened in one small area of the Norman countryside shortly after midnite, in the wee hours of the 6th of June, 1944. I might also recommend viewing a representation of Maj John Howard's exploits as a part of the movie, "The Longest Day." For those who have seen that film, this book will provide wonderful detail for enhancing their comprehension of the stunning complexity of the invasion by illustrating this one tiny piece of the invasion scenario.
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More About the Author

Dr. Stephen Ambrose was a renowned historian and acclaimed author of more than 30 books. Among his New York Times best-sellers are: Nothing Like It in the World, Citizen Soldiers, Band of Brothers, D-Day - June 6, 1944, and Undaunted Courage.He was not only a great author, but also a captivating speaker, with the unique ability to provide insight into the future by employing his profound knowledge of the past. His stories demonstrate how leaders use trust, friendship and shared experiences to work together and thrive during conflict and change. His philosophy about keeping an audience engaged is put best in his own words: "As I sit at my computer, or stand at the podium, I think of myself as sitting around the campfire after a day on the trail, telling stories that I hope will have the members of the audience, or the readers, leaning forward just a bit, wanting to know what happens next." Dr. Ambrose was a retired Boyd Professor of History at the University of New Orleans. He was the Director Emeritus of the Eisenhower Center in New Orleans, and the founder of the National D-Day Museum. He was also a contributing editor for the Quarterly Journal of Military History, a member of the board of directors for American Rivers, and a member of the Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Council Board. His talents have not gone unnoticed by the film industry. Dr. Ambrose was the historical consultant for Steven Spielberg's movie Saving Private Ryan. Steven Spielberg and Tom Hanks purchased the film rights to his books Citizen Soldiers and Band of Brothers to make the 13-hour HBO mini-series Band of Brothers. He has also participated in numerous national television programs, including ones for the History Channel and National Geographic.

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#37 in Books > History
#37 in Books > History