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PT-109


List Price: $19.99
Price: $16.68 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
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$16.68 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

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PT-109 + Midway (Collector's Edition) + In Harm's Way
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Editorial Reviews

President John F. Kennedy kept a unique inauguration gift on his White House desk: a coconut encased in plastic. The tale of that coconut is the heroic story of PT 109. Academy Award winner* Cliff Robertson stars in this stirring saga of Kennedy's wartime exploits as skipper of a PT boat in the Solomon Islands. The assignment: harass the enemy and buy time for a U.S. Navy still on the drawing boards. In August 1943, PT 109 was sliced in half by a Japanese destroyer. Kennedy led his surviving crew through a sea aflame from gasoline, towing a badly burned sailor miles to the nearest island. There seemed little hope of rescue from the Japanese-dominated area...until a strategy involving a coconut emerged. The triumphant outcome was unbelievable - and all true!

This product is manufactured on demand using DVD-R recordable media. Amazon.com's standard return policy will apply.


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Product Details

  • Actors: Ty Hardin, James Gregory, Robert Culp, Grant Williams Cliff Robertson
  • Directors: Leslie H. Martinson
  • Writers: Howard Sheehan, Richard L. Breen, Robert J. Donovan, Vincent X. Flaherty
  • Producers: Bryan Foy
  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.77:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Warner Archive
  • DVD Release Date: November 2, 2011
  • Run Time: 140 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (170 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B004TPJN3C
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,613 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "PT-109" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Love all the old movies.
packrat
They just don't make movies, like this anymore, with honest, good content...... Would like to see more of the old movie releases.
mkimbro
To show are leader at a early stage in his life .
Terry Hazelip

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

36 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Noel Serrano on November 24, 2008
Format: VHS Tape
PT 109 is a 1963 biographical movie which shows the events of John F. Kennedy's actions in command of Motor Torpedo Boat PT-109 as an officer of the United States Navy during World War II. The movie was adapted by Richard L. Breen, Vincent Flaherty and Howard Sheehan from the book PT 109: John F. Kennedy in WWII by Robert J. Donovan.

The movie stars Cliff Robertson, Ty Hardin, James Gregory, Robert Culp, Robert Blake, Andrew Duggan (the uncredited narrator), Michael Pate and George Takei (uncredited as helmsman on Japanese destroyer, best known as Sulu of Star Trek). The exteriors for the movie were filmed at Little Palm Island (formerly Little Torch Key), a resort in the Florida Keys. Power and fresh water were run out to the island for the movie, allowing the resort to be built years later. The former owner was the local Monroe county sheriff.

The most dramatic special effect is what appears to be a full-size set with live actors appearing to be crushed by the bow of a destroyer.

In the movie, the PT 109 is reported missing and a search is started. According to National Geographic, and the original book, the boat explosion was observed from other PT boats in the vicinity and it was given up as lost. A memorial service was held at the motor torpedo boat squadron's forward operating base at Rendova while the crew was still marooned on the islands in the vicinity of Japanese-held Kolombagara Island.

Solomon Islanders Biuki Gasa and Eroni Kumana were portrayed as random natives, when in fact they were dispatched by the coastwatcher, Arthur Reginald Evans, to find them. The movie holds to the Donovan book version that Kennedy first suggested the idea of using a coconut for a message, using a knife to carve it.
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36 of 40 people found the following review helpful By cv66rwm@aol.com on January 8, 1999
Format: VHS Tape
The movie as a whole was entertaining for it's time but not very accurate about real events that actually took place. To the reviewer from Baltimore: To understand how a craft such as this got rammed you need to understand how these boats patroled ,which by the way was always done at night and usually idiling on one engine (out of three) which at times never responded very well on quick response. Take it from a Navy veteran ,its very dark at sea at night. I for one review it as a very non-violent & entertaining film for younger and older viewers alike
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By John Dziadecki on October 3, 2011
Format: DVD
This review references the WB Archive DVD that became available in 2011 -- it's great! What more do you want? Get it!

Prior to the Warner Archive release, the film has been released on VHS in pan & scan and widescreen and also on laserdisc. Why this film has never been previously released on DVD remains a mystery but this Warner Archive release blows previous releases out of the water!

Warner Archive discs are DVD-Rs -- not mass-pressings. Warner Archive source materials are of variable quality but usually pretty darn good. This keeps studio costs down and spares the studio the cost of full-fledged remastering. Archive releases are bare bones -- don't expect anything more than the featured film. Hopefully, WB will start offering Blu-ray options in this series. Hats off to Warner for their continued pioneering efforts in home video.

"PT 109" was theatrically released in July 1963. I was a high school sophomore when I saw the film in its initial release -- it was quite impressive on the big screen. The film was a modest success in its limited release. Four months after it premiered, tragically, Kennedy was assassinated. Warner pulled the film from circulation.

For this 2011 DVD release, Warner states: "This Warner Archive Collection presentation of PT-109 has been sourced from a recently-created HD 1080p master, derived from newly-manufactured film elements. The feature is presented in 16x9 Letterbox format, preserving the film's original 2.40 theatrical aspect ratio."

Image quality here *is* excellent! Maybe this is a dry run for a Blu-ray release? Contrast is good. Colors are rich and clean as befits the South Pacific locale -- albeit most exteriors were filmed around the Florida Keys and Hollywood stages.
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17 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Charles Thrasher on June 14, 2011
Format: DVD
I give the Movie 4 Stars, Good enjoyable movie.... Why does Amazon not say this is a WB MOD DVDR not a DVD and Why did WB make it on DVDR and not Blu-Ray....They themselves Say and I quote "This Warner Archive Collection presentation of PT-109 has been sourced from a recently-created HD 1080p master, derived from newly-manufactured film elements. The feature is presented in 16x9 Letterbox format, preserving the film's original 2.40 theatrical aspect ratio." again I say why not make it on a Blu-Ray??????? and while I am in a grouchy mood...... Why does WB charge $19.99 and up for MOD DVDR's??????? I know they want to recoup their costs but hell they would probably sell more at $12-15 than at $20.......Anyway to all.... enjoy this Flic.....
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Paul J. Moade on April 22, 2011
Format: DVD
I won't try to talk about or offer an opinion on the historical accuracy of this film. There are a couple of other reviews that do just that and are probably much more competant to render an opinion than I am.

However, I have seen the movie several times and own a VHS copy. I've been waiting for the DVD to make an appeaarance. And it looks like this is about to happen shortly.

The film covers JFK in his role as a Naval officer in World War II as the commander of a Patrol/Torpedo boat --- numbered 109. Cliff Robertson was an excellent choice of actors to potray the young Kennedy and played the part admirably. The story starts out with the assignment of Kennedy to a PT boat squadron in the Pacific; only to find that there are no boats available for the new commander. However, there is an old decreped boat (number 109) sitting in dock and covered with debris. The boat needs a lot of work to make it seaworthy and a bit of hunting to find a crew. However, Kennedy tackles the job with enthusiasm and soon has the craft up to snuff to pass the most rigorous inspection the Squadron Commander can give it.

The story continues with the first couple of missions on which 109 is a part of. Good war sequences all. This, along with the preparation of the boat comprise the first third to half of the film.

Then, as the boat is on patrol, it is rammed and sunk by a Japanese destroyer; leaving the crew burned and vulnerable in dangerous and occupied waters. The second part of the film concerns itself with Kennedy taking the lead and getting the bulk of his crew to the nearest atoll for survival.
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