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PX This.: (diary of the potted plant) Paperback – May 13, 2004


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 493 pages
  • Publisher: iUniverse, Inc. (May 13, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0595319475
  • ISBN-13: 978-0595319473
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 6.1 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,039,616 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Abbe Diaz is a freelance commercial-artist and designer/dressmaker. She has worked in the restaurant/bar industry for nearly twenty years, with numerous stints throughout the New York party scene that include: Limelight, Palladium, Tunnel, Club USA, Coffee Shop, Spy, Cafe Tabac, Mercer Kitchen, Lotus, and Theo. She served as a Maitre d? at The Park, Smith, and 66. She was educated at Rutgers College, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, and currently resides in Staten Island, New York.

More About the Author

Abbe Diaz is a freelance commercial artist, designer/dressmaker, and restaurant consultant. She has worked in the restaurant/bar industry for nearly 25 years, with numerous stints throughout the New York dining/party scene that include: Limelight, Palladium, Tunnel, Club USA, Coffee Shop, Spy, Cafe Tabac, The Strand (Miami Beach), Mercer Kitchen, Ilo, Lotus, and Theo. She served as the opening maitre d' for The Park, Smith, and 66.

She is proud to have had the opportunity to work under such nightlife arbiters as: Jean-Georges Vongerichten, Brian McNally, Jonathan Morr, Peter Gatien, Eric Goode, and Sean Macpherson.

Diaz gained a B.A. in Economics from Rutgers College, Rutgers University - New Brunswick. She was further educated as a non-matriculated Design student at the Fashion Institute of Technology, in NYC, where she currently resides.

PX This has been lauded as "the bible of the [NYC] industry," and its author, Abbe Diaz, has been featured in various media outlets such as The New York Daily News, The New York Post, msn.com, The Morning Show (Australia), CBS's The Insider, The New York Observer, Blackbook, Time Out New York, Perez Hilton, Gawker, LXTV-NBC, NBC Chicago, New York magazine, Mediabistro, hamptons.com, and foodchannel.com, just to name a few.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Abbe has fascinating insights into human nature, and her story shows the value of staying true to yourself and never giving up on your dream.
Pete Lemonj
In fact, the book has the best prologue I've ever read, where the author basically says "this is how I write and if you don't like it, go get another book!"
Peter Damian
Originally I started doing this to find out how much was dramatized fiction, but the random snippets and pictures I found actually enhanced the book.
J. Uehara

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 27 people found the following review helpful By J. Uehara on March 31, 2005
Format: Paperback
This is "The Devil wears Prada" meets "Kitchen Confidential" for the front of the (restaurant) house, in a stream of consciousness, journal format that is dishy, engaging and has smirky humor throughout.

For battle-weary vets of the latest see-and-be-seen restaurant... want to know why you're waiting 45 minutes for your `reservation' only to watch some walk-ins saunter by and get whisked away to a table? I loved the insight into "logic" re: VIP ("PX") status, strategic table seating, to how long they'll tell you the wait is (versus how long it REALLY is).

I'm a closet Star Magazine reader, so I ate up the casual reportings of celebrity behavior when the cameras have been stowed and the media is on the other side of the VIP door.

The whole 'recent real-life' dimension was fascinating. I started looking up events and people referenced. Originally I started doing this to find out how much was dramatized fiction, but the random snippets and pictures I found actually enhanced the book. I ended up keeping my laptop nearby as I read.

For example: there's an entry about a photo shoot for a review of a restaurant where Abbe is working. She ends up in the published pic, and then a popular website guide uses the photo for their restaurant listing.

So I look up the website and bingo THERE IS THE PICTURE. Cool.

Later, I'm congratulating myself because I've web-sleuthed the identities of pseudonymed bad guys, names disguised to protect the not-so-innocent. (And boy there's a lot of corroborating testimony out there!)

Intertwined throughout is Abbe's life-- defeats and triumphs with evil bosses, flaky clients and love dramas. I quite enjoyed the whole thing on so many levels; I now keep up with her doings on her blog. Go Abbe!
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14 of 20 people found the following review helpful By LZ on April 24, 2005
Format: Paperback
PX This covers the early years of a struggling clothing designer who supported herself by working in restaurants while she tried to get her designer label, Geld Iaz, out into the competitive world of New York fashion. The author and central character is an American-born Filipina who rides a motorcycle and has an attitude. While doing her side gig, she was privy to the inner workings of some of the best restaurants in New York and has a rare perspective on some of their celebrity clients.

It's a long book because there is lots to cover: she was in New York when 9/11 happened, she had multiple jobs in multiple places, she got addicted to web boards and e-friends when her other relationships weren't there for her, and then she finds love and goes through all the typical doubts we often all have about love. I won't spoil the ending, but it's realistic, and still ongoing at [...]

The book is a diary that spans four years (2000-2004). It isn't a book with standard plot arcs and predictable resolutions, though I suppose it could have been edited to have them. I guess anyone's diary could be edited like that. The writing is stylistic - kind of like how it would sound inside someone's head - more than it is "correct grammar." It's a unique voice.

The thing that makes this book worthwhile is that the author lives a very cool life and allows the readers to ride along in a sidecar as she goes through her ups and downs. After reading enough of her down times you have to marvel at her chutzpah. Some might call it arrogance, but as you travel along while she goes on her day to day experiences, it's amazing she kept at it. Chutzpah, balls, whatever you call it, is...weirdly compelling.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Peter Damian on October 4, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
What each reviewer has said about this book is true. It is an entertaining (or boring, depending on your taste) book about the high-end restaurant business in NYC with a lot of celebrity gossip thrown in. This is the foreground of the book, and to be honest if this was all the book was about, it wouldn't be my cup of tea. But there is much more going on in the deeper layers that give this book a lot of richness. I wanted to point out these other layers which I found far more interesting than the foreground.

The first thing that hits you over the head is the writing style. In fact, the book has the best prologue I've ever read, where the author basically says "this is how I write and if you don't like it, go get another book!" That's balls, right on page 1! Others have talked about the writing style as anything from a nuisance to an acquired taste. I think they've missed the most creative aspect of the book. The writing style is original and authentic - a big breath of fresh air. While many other writers are struggling to fit their thoughts into the rules of grammar, this author has thrown grammar out the window to be true to herself. The writing style is far more pure than anything grammatically correct, and in my opinion is the best part of the book. The author invents and plays with words in a way that's uniquely creative. My creative juices started flowing just by reading this book. Had this book followed grammatical rules it would have been reduced to mediocrity; and it made me wonder how many books were marginalized by the handcuffs of grammar.

Second, there is a whole industry devoted to helping the sexes understand each other better.
Read more ›
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