Pact with the Devil 2001 R

Amazon Instant Video

(10) IMDb 3.8/10
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This modern retelling of Oscar Wilde's THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY.

Starring:
Malcolm McDowell, Ethan Erickson
Runtime:
1 hour 26 minutes

Pact with the Devil

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Product Details

Genres Thriller, Horror
Director Allan A. Goldstein
Starring Malcolm McDowell, Ethan Erickson
Supporting actors Victoria Sanchez, Ron Lea, Jennifer Nitsch, Karen Cliche, Amy Sloan, Carl Alacchi, Bronwen Booth, Henri Pardo, Daniella Ferrera, Jane McLean, Ellen David, Christoph Waltz
Studio First Look
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

Laughable in all the wrong ways.
DonMac
Firstly, he kills everyone who tries to kill him, even when there is someone two meters away from him with a gun pointed to his nose and he is only empty-handed.
Saulo de Oliveira
The surprises Self pulls off at the end of this familiar story are incredible.
Found Highways

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Found Highways VINE VOICE on May 14, 2004
Format: VHS Tape
I liked Pact with the Devil because I agree with the above proclamation by Henry, the satanic business manager of fashion photographer Bae. Henry discovers Louis working as a gofer on one of Bae's shoots. Henry convinces Louis (who changes his name to Dorian) to become a model as a way of getting enough attention to achieve his goal of becoming a photographer himself. But when Bae warns Dorian about Henry ("He's been doing this forever") she means it.
Pact with the Devil is not a great movie, but it held my attention. It reminded me of a middling Hammer film from the sixties (that's not a disparagement) in its deliberate pacing and focus on the acting.
In a small twist, Pact with the Devil also shows the influence a great artist can have on the most powerful forces in the world. (It's the reason Louis changes his name to Dorian.)
Again quoting Henry: "Art is a sickness." That must be why Henry is drawn to artists.
But here we have a postmodern Dorian, different from those who came before in that he's more of a victim (aren't we all?). This Dorian still gives in to his desire for eternal youth, but here Henry is more tempter than just cynical observer. And in this version Dorian isn't solely responsible for many of the crimes that mar the face in the photograph he hides from the world.
(ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDATION: If you were interested enough in this film to read this review, read Will Self's latest novel, Dorian: An Imitation. The surprises Self pulls off at the end of this familiar story are incredible. Even Henry might not believe them.)
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Charles J. Rector on November 20, 2005
Format: DVD
Pact with the Devil begins with one Louis (Ethan Erickson in his first starring role) working as a go-fer for a blonde fashion photographer (Jennifer Nitsch). One of the other photographers, Henry Wooten (Malcom McDowell) takes an interest in Louis. Henry talks to Louis about his interests and it turns out that Louis is trying to become a professional photographer in his own right, but is going nowhere in his quest. Henry tells Louis that with his good looks, he ought to be "in front of the camera." In other words, Louis should endeavor to become a male model. Louis agrees to hire Henry as his business manager and as a result, Henry takes some photographs of Louis and shows them around to other photographers. Soon, Louis's career as a model is booming.

However, there are problems. Louis's girlfriend (Amy Sloan) gets jealous of his accomplishments and accuses him of "selling out." Also, Louis comes to realize that his new career will last only as long as his good, youthful looks do. Henry, however offers Louis a solution to his problem, which Louis comes to call a "pact with the devil." Louis changes his name to Dorian Gray. Henry takes a photograph of "Dorian" that is blown up to large size and framed. As long as this photo exists, Dorian will maintain his youthful good looks and enjoy perfect health while his framed photo ages. In other words, the image of Dorian ages the way that the human being formerly named Louis would have if he did not make his pact with the devil Henry Wooten. If the picture is destroyed, then Louis's looks will revert to what they were in the picture at the time of its destruction and Louis's health will be similarly impaired. Truly, Louis/Dorian's arrangement with his business manager Henry Wooten is a pact with the devil.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Draconis Blackthorne on January 10, 2005
Format: DVD
Based on Oscar Wilde's classic "The Picture of Dorian Gray", this film "deals" with a common stage hand named 'Lewis' {Ethan Erickson} who makes a pact with The Devil in exchange for wealth and fame, and ultimately, to fund his passion for photography, which merely became an erstwhile segueway to his self-imposed damnation. Immediately, upon dabbing a mirror with his blood one stormy night, he begins experiencing an increase in the quality of life, as all his desires and indulgences are met. A rather mysterious man with the unlikely name of "Henry" {Michael Mc Dowell}, detects potential in him, thereby granting his favor by making him a super-model, to which he takes advantage of a marvellous lifestyle of carnal delights, and all he has to do is essentially "strike a pose", while remaining youthful and handsome forever, while his hidden portrait assumes old age - but wouldn't you know it, he eventually dissappears and becomes an ingrate. At one point, he becomes essentially a "kept man" in the manse of a European couple wherein he becomes the surrogate lover of a gorgeous brunette while her husband watches on - that relationship eventually leads to a lethal extreme. The prodigal eventually returns to the source of his fortune, and not being able to handle fortune and fame, eventually commits suicide and reverts to his so-called "true form", reminiscient of Nosferatu. So The Prince of Darkness goes back to the drawing board and seeks out another hopeful who may appreciate the gift so graciosly conferred.

What I primarily enjoyed about this film is that it did not rely heavily upon the typical exaggerrated aesthetics of the mythos, but kept the storyline subtle enough to lend an air of pseudo-believability in a contemporary world.
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