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Painkiller

March 19, 2002 | Format: MP3

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Song Title
Time
Popularity Prime  
1
6:07
2
3:36
3
3:57
4
3:34
5
4:47
6
5:46
7
4:49
8
5:44
9
0:56
10
6:48
11
5:21
12
3:39

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: March 5, 2002
  • Release Date: March 5, 2002
  • Label: Columbia
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 55:00
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00138EYG4
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (163 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #844 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

The drums are great, the guitars are great and vocals are awesome.
aldoman
Just as I had mentioned before in my Ram It Down review, songs don't have to have good lyrics to simply rock, and rocking is what this album does very well.
M. B. Link
If you like metal, like I do, this is a must have, easily one of the best albums in all metal.
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

41 of 46 people found the following review helpful By A. Stutheit on November 3, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Following the poor record sales of 1988's attempted but largely unsuccessful comeback, "Ram It Down," Judas Priest tried to win their fans back with their twelfth studio effort, 1990's "Painkiller." Frontman Rob Halford, axemen K.K. Downing and Glenn Tipton, bassist Ian Hill, and drummer Scott Travis went about this task by returning to their classic, 1970's style of metal while simultaneously intermixing some techniques from modern, contemporary speed metal bands. The result was a masterful new disc, the heaviest and most musically complex of Judas Priest's career, which successfully won all of the band's fans back, and even gained them many new fans. "Painkiller" is not only the definition of a Nineties' classic; it's a truly wonderful comeback, and easily the best release of Priest's long and storied career. Plus--since it's saturated with fast riffs, scorching leads, extended, technical solos, quick drumming, and Rob's shrieking vocals--many music fans think (justifably so) that "Painkiller" is the epitome of speed metal. It's also one of the most famous and important albums on heavy metal's timeline. Motorhead may have given birth to speed metal, but "Painkiller" has spawned a generation of imitators, so it's equally as influential as anything by, well, any other band. The opening title track sets the mood well for the rest of the songs. It has a fast drum beat and fast churning riffs, as well as Rob's standard, very high pitched vocals, and two sweet guitar solos (the first of which is well over a minute long!) The appropriately titled "All Guns Blazing," has a spectacular, wailing solo which has several different parts to it. The next song, "Leather Rebel," is a very speedy track with an almost buzzsaw rhythm, and track five ("Metal Meltdown") features three back-to-back guitar solos.Read more ›
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By R. Gorham on May 17, 2007
Format: Audio CD
THE BAND: Rob Halford (vocals), K.K. Downing (guitar), Glenn Tipton (guitar), Ian Hill (bass), Scott Travis (drums & percussion).

THE DISC: (1990) 10 tracks clocking in at approximately 46 minutes. Included with the disc is a 10-page booklet containing song titles/credits, song lyrics and one black & white band photo. All songs written by Halford/Tipton/Downing. Remastered with bonus tracks and expanded liner notes in 2001 (55 total minutes). Recorded at Miraval Studios (Brignoles, France). Label - Columbia Records.

COMMENTS: "Painkiller" is an ultra large dose of traditional Judas Priest sounds with some speed & thrash metal mixed in. In other words... compared to their previous two albums, the metal messiahs have returned to form! Nothing can compare to the band's early releases ("Stained Glass" though "Screaming For Vengeance") in the late 1970's and early 80's... but "Painkiller" comes close. For me, "Turbo" (1986) and "Ram It Down" (1988) were way to pop, to tame, too much bubblegum - way to happy. "Painkiller" showed the band still had the balls to bang their heads the old school way. Looking back now, "Painkiller" is still a bittersweet album. Rob Halford would officially leave the band in 1991, and Judas Priest was pronounced dead from '91-95... only to resurge in '96 with replacement scab singer, Tim "Ripper" Owens. To me, this was like David Lee Roth leaving Van Halen, or Bruce Dickinson leaving Iron Maiden... maintaining that ANY replacement would simply be unacceptable. Also note long time drummer Dave Holland was out and new skin pounder Scott Travis (from Racer-X) was in - bringing extremely quick feet and lots of heavy double bass.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Alex A. Fintonis on July 27, 2006
Format: Audio CD
1990 was another great year for the world of heavy metal, "Razor's Edge", "No Prayer for the Dying", "Rust in Peace", and who could forget "Painkiller". Alas, the last album Rob Halford would do with Judas Priest. It wouldn't be until another 15 years that he would reunite with his former mates and produce "Angel of Retribution". I must say that Halford left with one heck of a bang. Painkiller is in my opinion Priest heaviest and fastest album to date.

Throughout most of the mid 80s Priest was in a way, was put down a notch by bands such as Metallica, Megadeth, Anthrax, and Slayer. Up until the debut of bands such as these nobody could touch Priest's speed and aggression, well maybe Iron Maiden comes close. But Judas Priest's albums got a bit more laid back. Don't get me wrong, I do think "Turbo", and "Ram it Down" shred, but the release of "Painkiller" showed the bands of thrash that Priest weren't done yet. This album turned a lot of heads. It gave the reaction like "Wow, who the heck is this?"

Listening to this whole album feels like one is on a motorcycle going 300 miles an hour. All I can say is that my neck hurts for days after I've been head banging to this album. The title track being the opener on the record lets the listener know what they're getting into. There is just not any time to rest. Tracks such as "All Guns Blazing", "Metal Meltdown", "Between the Hammer and the Anvil", and "Night Crawler" are relentless in pounding one's head into submission. Glenn Tipton and K.K. Downing's guitar work is top-notch just pure heavy metal greatness. Rob Halford's vocals get so high that ears bleed and windows break.

The only real shocker was that after the release of this phenomenal album Rob Halford would be leaving a couple of years later.
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