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How Pakistan Negotiates with the United States: Riding the Roller Coaster (Cross-Cultural Negotiation Books) Paperback – April 1, 2011


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Product Details

  • Series: Cross-Cultural Negotiation Books
  • Paperback: 210 pages
  • Publisher: United States Institute of Peace (April 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1601270755
  • ISBN-13: 978-1601270757
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,492,750 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

How Pakistan Negotiates with the United States is an impressive, insightful and truly important book, especially for Americans who cannot decide whether Pakistan is America’s friend or foe. They will learn that the issue is more complex and respective grievances are more reciprocal.

A fascinating account of how Pakistanis have historically used a mix of charm, military polish, occasional deception, guilt trips, pleas of national weakness, knowledge of Afghanistan, and strategically advantageous geography right next to Afghanistan to induce the United States to do more for them.

Read the full review here.

About the Author

Teresita Schaffer specialized in South Asia and international economics during her thirty-year career in the U.S. Foreign Service. She served in Islamabad and New Delhi (1974-77 and 1977-79), as deputy assistant secretary of state for South Asia (1989 92), as U.S. ambassador to Sri Lanka (1992 95), and as director of the Foreign Service Institute (1995 97). She created and directed the South Asia program at CSIS from 1998-2010.

Howard Schaffer is a professor at Georgetown University's Institute for the Study of Diplomacy. During his thirty-six year career in the U.S. Foreign Service, he served as ambassador to Bangladesh (1984 87), political counselor at American embassies in India (1977 79) and Pakistan (1974 77), and he was twice deputy assistant secretary of state responsible for South Asian affairs.

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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Toragaiko on January 28, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Americans visiting Pakistan for the first time are flabbergasted by the litany of betrayal by the United States that Pakistanis unleash on them. This may be especially true for Americans who perceive that Pakistan has repeatedly betrayed the United States since 9/11--with Osama bin Laden's being found living in comfort just north of Islamabad as Exhibit One.

The authors walk the reader through the history of bilateral relations to explain why both sides have reason to perceive the other as unreliable. Each side has unreasonable unstated objectives about the other: the United States expecting Pakistan to give up its obsession with India; Pakistan expecting the United States to side with in against India in a significant way. The bilateral relationship falls apart when the gap over these unstated expectations becomes too glaring, and outweighs negotiated agreements on other issues.

The authors identify three occasions when the United States and Pakistan have agreed to become strategic allies (Pakistan entering the Cold War on the U.S. side in 1954; responding to the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan in 1980-81; responding to the 9/11 attacks). In each of the two earlier cases, the parties fell out over events driven by that gap over the bigger unstated issues about ten years after reaching agreement on the "lesser" issues.

Just a few months past the tenth anniversary of 9/11 and the start of the war in Afghanistan, are we set to follow the pattern again? I hope not, and the authors, experienced retired American diplomats, offer advice for how the United States might (and should) avoid a total break with Pakistan, while rethinking relations. As a former professor of mine puts it, "Pakistan has more people than Russia and more nukes than Great Britain."
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Loyd E. Eskildson HALL OF FAME on December 30, 2011
Format: Paperback
Pakistan's view of the world begins with the 1947 partition of India that created it, and the subsequent insecurity. (Pakistan is one-seventh the size of India.) Kashmir, ruled by India despite a Muslim majority, is an ongoing source of potential conflict between the two. India's support for the breaking away of East Pakistan in 1971 is another ongoing sore point with Pakistanis.

Pakistan - U.S. relations over the past 60 years have been marked by highs and lows, with three marriages and two divorces. The first divorce came in 1965 during the Pakistan - India war when Pakistan used U.S. provided weapons which Washington had warned them against using vs. India. Pakstan's nuclear program caused the second divorce, leading to the cut-off of assistance in the 1990s. Both instances involved Pakistan's refusal to accept U.S. conditions, and have led Pakistan to see the U.S. as an unfaithful ally - especially in comparison with China.

Pakistanis have also come to see the U.S. becoming more aligned with India as a means of counterbalancing China. Thus, Pakistan is not looking towards China, oil-rich Arab nations and other Muslim countries for backing.

Pakistan sees the U.S. as a counterweight to India and its neighbors, and the U.S. tries to use Pakistan to gain influence in the region. More recently, the U.S. has attempted to partner with Pakistan based on the premises that our and their goals in Pakistan are the same, and that both nations need the other. Authors Schaffer contend that this is only half true. Both nations would like to see a peaceful Afghanistan, but U.S. concerns over al Qaeda in Afghanistan are of much less concern to Pakistan than preventing India from having significant influence there. (India's consulates in Jalalabad and Kandahar don't help.
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With Pakistan on the verge of imploding, we are all fortunate to have the benefit of the insights and professional acumen of Tessie and Howie Schaffer. Literally, they wrote the book, and are still active in guiding the U.S. through a sea of shoals almost unlike any other part of the world. Let us hope both John Kerry and Chuck Hagel (both extraordinarily qualified for their posts) will seek Shafferian advice as they steer a course that combines both the patience of diplomacy and the necessity of American leadership in a volatile part of the world.
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