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Pandora's Genes Mass Market Paperback – April 1, 1985


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 279 pages
  • Publisher: Popular Library; First Edition edition (April 1985)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0445200049
  • ISBN-13: 978-0445200043
  • Product Dimensions: 6.7 x 4.1 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,872,707 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

I knew I wanted to be a writer from the time I was old enough to hold a pencil. I scribbled stories and "novels" from second grade onward. I bought my first typewriter with babysitting money when I was 14. Now, 50+ published books later, I am still at it, still creating stories for both adults and children.

I was raised in Tucson, Arizona, and lived in New York City for twenty years as an adult. Now I'm back in Tucson, and consider it paradise. I live in the foothills of the Catalina Mountains with my wonderful husband and our four cats, Sammy, Gwinny, Tasha, and Google.

I spend several hours a week as a volunteer naturalist at a local nature park, where I lead nature walks and frequently participate in the reptile show.

In addition to writing, I have led many novel-writing workshops, and until recently edited and evaluated manuscripts. I am currently working on the third novel in my Pandora's science fiction series, to be titled "Pandora's Promise."

Writing is my profession and my passion.

The pictures here show me as a young woman, in Leningrad, at Dostoeveky's grave; with one of my favorite subjects at the nature park; and me as I am when I'm smiling in the sunshine.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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See all 12 customer reviews
I'm so glad a friend referred me to this book.
Diane Kelly
There's a big romantic triangle in this book, and the three characters involved are the best developed.
K. P. Badertscher
I also fell in love with Evvy's companion the fox-cat.
S. Greene

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A.B. on April 8, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
I read this award-winning sci-fi novel in paperback last year, and it blew me away. I know it was written in the mid-1980s, but it's more relevant to what's happening in the U.S. right now than anything that had occurred when the author was working on it.

In Lance's dystopian tale, set in the late 21st century, all modern technology has been destroyed, a consequence of using genetically-engineered bacteria to clean up a massive oil spill. The microbes consumed all petroleum-based products, including plastics, and released germ warfare materials as the stoppers on test tubes dissolved.

Against this backdrop, an unusual love triangle emerges, with the young scientist, Evvy, at its center.

Sounds eerily relevant to today's headlines, doesn't it? Think BP oil spill. And in Lance's depiction of the messianic movement called the Traders, religious zealots who condemn all science as anti-God, you hear echoes of today's anti-evolution,anti-climate science religious-political movements. A must-read.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By K. P. Badertscher on April 17, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I wasn't really looking for romance when Pandora's Genes was recommended to me. I ended up falling in love with the story anyway. The near-future post-petroleum world really comes alive right from the opening scenes of the book. The characters are interesting too, but compared with the sharp depiction of the main characters, secondary characters seem a little out of focus. As the plot developed, it rewarded me for sticking with all the characters to see what happened. The strong narrative and imaginative world kept me reading.

There's a big romantic triangle in this book, and the three characters involved are the best developed. The settings in the book seemed more alive to me than the supporting characters. I found the male characters propensity for thinking with their junk a little annoying. The female characters were strong and well-rounded, but all the males seemed a little too focused on sexual matters. The dialogue was well written, but everyone spent a lot of time discussing their feelings. That's romance for you! I could have gone for a little more revelation and a little less conversation.

This book was originally published in 1985, and was recently self-published by the author, Kathryn Lance. It's great that she took the initiative to do this. I wish more published authors would do this with their older books.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By G. Warren on February 8, 2008
Format: Kindle Edition
I stumbled across this one recently at a used-book store, expecting a reasonably good SF page-turner, based on the cover info. It turned out to be much richer and deeper than that. The story is fulfilling enough on it's own, but it is really character-driven, and rewardingly so. They aren't just fully-developed, they grow and change, so you begin to care what happens to them, and not just because they are the people at the center of the action. None of this dilutes the "story" which is, in fact, a page-turner. Win-win!
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Michael J. Joyce on December 16, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I first read this book as a kid, forgot it, and then found it on amazon again. Its basically a good read which posits a society destoyed by genetic experimentation gone awry. Some time in the past an engineered bug, which was originally intended to destroy oil spills, got loose and destoyed all planetary oil reserves. In the process, the bug also attacks the seals on other genetic experiments, loosing a number of genetic horrors on the world. This leads to massive mutations and plagues all over the world.
This story deals with the attempt by a man, known as the principal, to restore some semblance of civilization and cure the genetic problems facing society in the face of resistance from militant luddites. However, the story is complicated by the relationship of the principal, his brother and right hand man, and the woman that both of them love.
Its an interesting story with an interesting setting, however, I wuld have enjoyed more exposition and background info on the world that was created. There is a sequel out there somewhere which may be of interest to some (Pandora's Children), however, judging by the fact that mine is the only review...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Joanna Williams on December 26, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book makes me cringe. There is a decent story in here. But. If I had bought a hard copy of this book, I would be destroying it.

My main objection to this story is the principal. This man is as far from a hero as you can get. He buys young girls (usually about 13 yrs old) from their parents. The parents have no real choice. If they do not accept the money, they will lose their daughter anyway. The Principals Procurers collect these virginal children so the "noble leader" can abuse and rape them. He freely admits that they don't enjoy what he does and that they will hate him when he is done with them.

And then, after spending the bulk of his life as an abusive pedophile, this man finally experiences true love with an actual consenting adult. Hooray! He's cured of his perversion!

How many women are murdered every year because they mistakenly believe that their husband/ boyfriend would stop hurting them if only I could... Shame on you Kathryn Lance.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jay Michael Jones on December 4, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This fascinating, imaginative novel is hard to put down, so don't. Instead, become caught up in the setting of a future Earth where civilization has broken down and only small pockets of order and learning remain, like that under the Principal's rule. Enjoy the romantic triangle between the powerful leader called the Principal, his brother Zach the charismatic general, and the strong, appealing girl Evvy. But most of all revel in the plot twists and the recognizable likelihood of possible future events, even in the sometimes infuriating thick-headedness that always seems to plague protagonists.

In this complex dystopian world created by K.L. Lance, the breakdown in society is explained in terms that are understandable and perhaps prophetic, pitting scientists with learning and logic against zealots guided by desperation and ignorance. The obvious parallel between Right and Left is made believably inevitable - in fact the whole book has a "yes, I can see that happening" vibe. The main characters are well developed, likable despite one's disturbing habit, while the secondary characters are of course not as fully developed but still memorable, playing small but important roles in the storyline.

Ah, but then there is the tantalizing taste of the sequel, Pandora's Children. Bring it on. I'm ready for more.
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