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Pandora's Promise


Price: $34.39 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
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$34.39 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details Only 2 left in stock. Sold by MEGA Media and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Product Details

  • Format: Import, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 2 (Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Studio: Imports
  • DVD Release Date: December 17, 2013
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00GBYPH70
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #221,105 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

This was a very well done documentary.
N. Surles
I have kept up with the politic of Nuclear energy, even after Fukishima, and this documentary put things in perspective.
John Doe
It reveals the basis for those fears without mocking them.
R. Freeman

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By R. Freeman on January 19, 2014
Format: DVD
This is a no-nonsense documentary on nuclear power from the environmentalist perspective ... and it supports nuclear energy. Contradictory positions? Not really.

The documentary looks at the source and the reasoning behind the no-nuke movement. It reveals the basis for those fears without mocking them. It then dives into the actual, non-political science behind nuclear power's past, failures, and present. It is done in a non-threatening manner that is interesting compelling.

I watched this movie with my wife and son (17 yrs old) and all three of us were left with a feeling of reserved hope that others will watch this and support a future where we can cease being dependent on fossil fuels.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Alex on January 17, 2014
Format: DVD
I got to see a showing of this documentary at Middlebury College in Vermont. The place was packed, and afterwards we had the director of the film, Robert Stone, to answer questions from a panel of experts.
It answers the most pressing concerns and objections that environmentalists have, because the star and director of the film had those same views before. The evidence is compelling.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Learner on August 18, 2014
Format: DVD
This was a mind-changer for me. I've always been against nuclear power. But this movie countered my notions with facts that are hard to dispute, including my main concern which is how to deal with the waste.

I tend to trust the film because I am familiar with Mark Lynas - his excellent book Six Degrees: Our Future on a Hotter Planet is what opened my eyes to the seriousness of climate change.

Questions around power generation and the environment tend to be decided by emotion and partisanship, fueled by ignorant journalists. This movie calmly and rationally presents facts. Are they accurate? I don't know. But I am generally informed about the issues discussed and they didn't say anything that contradicts what I've learned in the past. I did, however, learn a lot of specifics from this film.

The example of France is hard to dispute. (And they aren't even using the safer, more modern designs, I believe.) France shows if you do things right (unlike Chernobyl, Fukushima, Three Mike Island) nuclear can be a good solution. I would be scared if places like Zimbabwe or Guatemala went nuclear. And I would hope future plants are not located so close to population centers, to be on the safe side. But first world countries should certainly consider it, if this film is correct. And it's the first world that needs to reduce fossil fuels - we're pumping out most of it.

Even if we used just enough nuclear to eliminate coal, that would be a huge win. Remember, coal has huge disadvantages besides also being so CO2-dirty. The reason you can't eat much tuna, for example, is mercury pollution largely from coal burning.

Is this movie biased or one-sided?
Read more ›
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Chris Dances on January 30, 2014
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
This documentary should be watched by everyone who is concerned about the state of our electric infrastructure and environment. This movie summarizes how nuclear power became the industry it is today, what it is now, and what it might be in the future. It makes some excellent points as to the true effects of nuclear power (the majority of them beneficial). While the purpose of the documentary is environmental, it would have been nice to discuss economics a little bit more (perhaps nuclear's biggest issue).
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By alex on January 4, 2014
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
Enlightening...even for a scientist familiar with the energy field. It gave a concise overview of the stats related to nuclear energy.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ronald W. Garrison on April 5, 2014
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
This is about as good a presentation of the most credible pro-nuke position as I've seen, and it's an up-to-date perspective. It shoots down a lot of the more ridiculous anti-nuke claims; this is very easy to do, and it seemed to be done fairly. It was particularly amusing to see Helen Caldicott get just enough rope, with which she well and properly hanged herself.

That said, I'm still not buying the nuclear renaissance. Fukushima showed that Murphy's Law has certainly not been repealed (although it still wasn't nearly as bad as some of the more ridiculous claims of the death-of-the-Pacific-Ocean nutjobs). Fukushima can't be simply dismissed as Chernobyl, as just a symptom of a collapsing system. One of the participants in the film said as much, and said it well.

The major part of the picture that Pandora's promise is deafeningly silent on is economics. If you want to generate most the world's electricity by nukes, as in France, how much is it going to cost to build all those plants, and later take care of the waste and decommissioning? Unlike wind and solar, nukes don't easily lend themselves to cost reduction, and they cannot easily be built quickly and in small units to match shifting demand. They also don't say anything quantitative about the economics of the competitors (basically, again wind and solar, and a bit from a few other things such as geothermal). I was about to say that this would've made the film more convincing. But maybe it wouldn't; that, in fact, is the problem.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By John Doe on February 24, 2014
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
This is a very informative documentary. I have kept up with the politic of Nuclear energy, even after Fukishima, and this documentary put things in perspective.

However it does not give you the complete details on the differences alternative Nuclear Reactors/Energy options out there, but it does mentioned some of them. But it is comprehensive in term of political perspective.

I had to paid to watch this documentary, as you can not watch it for free with Amazon Prime membership, and I did not regret it. Must watch for anyone who has a view, good or bad, on Nuclear Energy.
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