Kindle Price: $4.27

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Flip to back Flip to front
Audible Narration Playing... Paused   You are listening to a sample of the Audible narration for this Kindle book.
Learn more

Panic 2012: The Sublime and Terrifying Inside Story of Obama's Final Campaign (A BuzzFeed/Bl ue Rider Press Book) Kindle Edition

64 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
$4.27

Length: 161 pages Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details


More About the Author



Michael Hastings was a contributing editor to Rolling Stone and a correspondent at large for BuzzFeed. Before that he worked for Newsweek, where he rose to prominence covering the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. He was the recipient of the 2010 George Polk Award for his Rolling Stone magazine story "The Runaway General." Hastings was the author of critically praised three books: I Lost My Love in Baghdad: A Modern War Story, Panic 2012: The Sublime and Terrifying Inside Story of Obama's Last Campaign and the New York Times bestseller The Operators: The Wild and Terrifying Inside Story of America's War in Afghanistan, which was optioned for film by Brad Pitt's Plan B Productions. In 2010, he was named one of Huffington Post's Game Changers of the year. In 2009, his story Obama's War, published in GQ, was selected for the Best American Political Writing 2009 anthology. Hastings died in 2013, and was posthumously honored with the Norman Mailer Award for Emerging Journalist. His novel The Last Magazine (Blue Rider Press) will be released on June 17, 2014.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 39 people found the following review helpful By NSW TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 15, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is an appropriately-priced e-book, and is a solid example of what the format can provide - longform nonfiction work that's timely right now, but would be much less so in six months when a reader's attention has been diverted (Politico's Kindle series is good too, though I've only read excerpts).

It's a fun read, with plenty of behind-the-scenes anecdotes collected in one lengthy format. Hastings' accounts of his often contentious relations with fellow journalists and Obama campaign officials are entertaining and snarkily told. His reporting - a lot of which his endnotes explain was compiled by and credited to other journalists - gives a good, broad overview of the last couple months of the Obama campaign, when things looked good for his reelection, then horrible, then okay, then unsure, until the victory that with hindsight looks inevitable - I mean, President Romney? Really? Just three months later, that seems so silly.

Hastings is at his best when he goes after everyone with his brand of lacerating humor. He describes Press Secretary Jay Carney as a "regime collaborator," which is just so over-the-top and meanspirited and original - and appropriate. Carney, a former Time reporter, crossed over to the bigtime of politics, so if he's not a "collaborator," what is he?

The biggest flaw is there's not enough in the book of what makes Hastings work so fun to read. In The Operators, which I also liked, he related point-by-point conversations with exquisite detail - he looked bad, they looked bad, everybody looked bad. But it was honest, and that gave it value.

Here, he often starts what could be an equally great scene, but doesn't go far enough.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By New Yawkuh on February 12, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Wow. Sheesh. What an absolute mess. The tone lurches between neutral reportorial and over-the-top gonzo without rhyme or reason; stories with scant payoff are tediously set up; syntax can be so garbled that you find yourself rereading sentences four or five times. You get the feeling the whole thing was dictated while jogging. I realize it's only an e-book, but, c'mon, Hastings, would a second draft have killed you?

Here's a typical sample, describing the election night party in Chicago:

--------------
"Obama delivered his address. The confetti fell, looking even more incredible in digital high definition. The Obama campaign tweeted Barack and Michelle hugging: Four more years. Obama gave a speech, accepting his victory for a final term. Parties at the Fairmont and the Boss Bar went pretty late; there were a few meltdowns at the InterContinental."
--------------

...and that's it. What sort of meltdowns? He doesn't say. Instead, we're on to the day after, and another slew of disjointed, unrewarding observations. (BTW, I don't remember Obama giving two speeches that night. Again, dude: a second draft wouldn't have killed you!)

All the expected junctures are dutifully hit, including a big fat section on Obama's terrible first debate performance. Hastings recounts the lead-up day in tedious detail, but there's no takeaway, just scattered speculations. Obama got some bad advice. He was tired. He had a bumpy plane flight. The moderator killed the room's enthusiasm. It's essentially a chapter-long tap dance around "Geez, I have no idea".

And as for that painfully edgy subtitle: "Sublime and Terrifying Inside Story", there's nothing the least bit sublime or terrifying here.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By T. Cannon on May 9, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I like Michael Hastings. This book starts out sounding like it might be a Hunter Thompson-like "Fear and Loathing" campaign chronicle, but it quickly becomes evident that Hastings isn't that crazy. He paints a pretty clear picture of the White House press corps and what life is like for a peripheral, new media reporter who is "allowed" to come along for the ride. Michael shows how hard it is to get anything from the major campaign players and in the end, paints a very clear picture of how and why the suck-up reporters are what dominates the news we get today. Michael exercises some gonads and admits some mistakes as he learns the ropes. After reading it, I had a clearer understanding of why Hunter Thompson needed so much medication to report on the Nixon campaign back in '72.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By S. Moore on January 30, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is my third Hastings book; I thought "The Operators" was a very good book
and I admire Mr. Hastings for his ability not to be rolled by the so-called great and powerful. I think I've hit an age barrier with this author, however. I found the Kerouac/Tom Wolfe hipster style wearying. Too many ...dash-dash... sentences and too much profanity for me, an old lady. (If you want to see what a language ghetto looks like, there's nothing better than "The Wired" to explore the idea of inane profanity as a cultural prison.)

However, Mr. Hastings captures the shallowness of the campaign trail and all the stage managed show biz that goes with it. Shallow campaign for a shallow culture manipulated by the new technology. I suspect Mr. Hastings sees progress in our common culture where I see a growing degradation of our civil liberties and human rights. Please be advised I skimmed the last 30% of the book on my Kindle. Mind numbing sameness, just like the campaign trail, I suppose you could say. I left the bus early.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in