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Paper Tiger: An Old Sportswriter's Reminiscences of People, Newspapers, War, and Work Paperback – April 1, 2007


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 296 pages
  • Publisher: Bison Books (April 1, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0803259611
  • ISBN-13: 978-0803259614
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.6 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,216,809 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“A hymn to newspapering, the saga of a young man’s rise from paper to paper, job to job, until he reaches the very top and then pushes the ceiling far higher than anyone before him ever had. It's a vivid portrait of newsrooms in a day long since vanished—a day of whiskey bottles in desk drawers and file cabinets, of green eyeshades and galluses, of manual typewriters and pneumatic tubes, of two-day train rides and club-car poker games, of copy boys and Western Union—and of New York in the 1930s and ’40s. . . . Now [Woodward's] gone but not forgotten. Now he's remembered in those few places where literate, stylish sportswriting is respected and valued.”—Jonathan Yardley, Washington Post
(Jonathan Yardley Washington Post)

About the Author

In his phenomenal career, Stanley Woodward wrote a number of sports books, including Sports Page and Stanley Woodward's Football. He is the winner of three E. P. Dutton awards for sports writing. John Schulian is the author of Writers’ Fighters and Other Sweet Scientists and Twilight of the Long-ball Gods: Dispatches from the Disappearing Heart of Baseball, available in a Bison Books edition.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By R. Rowan on October 23, 2007
Format: Paperback
Stanley Woodward published his memoir and "hymn to newspapering" in 1963. On December 30, 2003, Jonathan Yardley penned an appreciation of Woodward and "Paper Tiger" in The Washington Post (the book was then out of print). The next four paragraphs are excerpts from Mr. Yardley's article.

Stanley Woodward stood 6 feet 3 inches tall, weighed 225 pounds and was strong as the proverbial ox. He loved sports but was injured repeatedly and had exceedingly bad eyesight, so he had to quit long before he was ready. He found a substitute. After World War I he got into journalism and in the 1930s went to the New York Herald Tribune, where he soon became "the best sports editor in the Tribune's, or probably any paper's, history.".

That is the judgment of Richard Kluger, as expressed in his monumental "The Paper: The Life and Death of the New York Herald Tribune." Today, nearly four decades after Woodward's death, it is a view near-universally held in the inner circles of sports journalism. During his two stints at the Trib, from 1930 to 1948 and 1959 to 1962, Kluger writes, its "sports pages achieved an unmatched level of pungent literacy," the full credit for which rested with Woodward. According to Frank Graham Jr., one of the many gifted writers who worked with him, he had "high standards and unfailing courage," including the courage to speak his mind to bosses who didn't always like what he said.

He was "direct, blunt, uncompromising and honest." That is the testimony of the best writer to grace his or anyone else's sports pages, Walter Wellesley "Red" Smith, whom Woodward rescued from inexplicable obscurity at the Philadelphia Record in 1945 and who quickly became a star of incomparable brilliance.
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By Customer on March 24, 2010
Format: Paperback
and that is why I enjoyed this book. I learned quite a bit about newspaper reporting in the first half of the 20th century. There were several of his recollections that made me laugh. I also enjoyed reading about his experiences as a war correspondent in WWII. His style is to the point yet colorful, making this book a pleasure to read. Every portion of Paper Tiger is immensely tasty. Read it!
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By WDX2BB on December 13, 2012
Format: Paperback
It would be silly to ask the question, who invented the modern sports section. Many people played a part in it over the years, of course, as sports journalism has evolved over the decades.

However, Stanley Woodward comes pretty close to being right at the forefront of the revolution. That's why it's so nice to have his autobiography, "Paper Tiger," back in print.

Woodward was the legendary sports editor of the New York Herald-Tribune. He took over after serving as a war correspondent in World War II, and raised the standards of the sports section dramatically. His first move was to hire a new columnist: Red Smith, who was one of the best stylists ever to work for a newspaper, or anywhere else for that matter. Woodward added a few other standouts, made sure everyone else stuck to his high standards, and got to work.

Woodward also fought battles in his own office, trying to upgrade the content. Suddenly the Union-Hamilton football game, which might have mattered to the graduates but that's about it, was off the assignment list. Women's club championships at country clubs? Dog shows? Gone. Yacht racing? Going. Sports sections went on a meat and potatoes diet, sticking to the big sports of the day (baseball, college football, boxing, horse racing, etc.) The image of the sports section as the toy department was flickering as a result, and competitors scrambled to keep up.

That made some enemies, and Woodward left his job in the 1950's, only to come back to the same position in the 1960's. He wrote upon returning, "As I was saying before I was so rudely interrupted..."

The book is hardly just about being a sports editor, luckily. Woodward covered plenty of events in his career, with suitable stories about many of them.
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