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153 of 168 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Compulsive Reader's Reviews
To everyone who surrounds Margo Roth Spiegelman, she is an adventurous, unconventional, and intelligent person and a highly admired someone that everyone puts on a pedestal. So when Margo sneaks into Quentin Jacobsen's room one glorious night and involves him in her crazy exploits, he can't help but feel as if a new page has been turned, and just maybe he can be a part of...
Published on October 2, 2008 by The Compulsive Reader

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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars So disappointing
I had moderately high hopes for this book but unfortuately they were dashed, because a story about an18 year old boy going to all these ridiculous lengths to find an incredibly psychotic and selfish girl who probably has borderline personality disorder is the sort of thing that only selfish girls with borderline tendencies would enjoy. The parents of both Q and Margo were...
Published 2 months ago by Cara Lee


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Read, May 27, 2014
This review is from: Paper Towns (Kindle Edition)
Green has such wonderful character development, helping the reader to appreciate both the strengths and weaknesses of each character. He has a real feel for adolescence and the way humans mature past the internal focus of childhood and start to develop a more well-rounded view of others.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Paper Towns- A Meaningful Boom, May 18, 2014
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This review is from: Paper Towns (Kindle Edition)
Paper Towns is almost a simple story but is filled with meaning. John Green captures every aspect of a paper town and paper girls and boys. He also captures a magnificent relationship between Margo and Quentin. Paper Towns is a book everybody should read to look at things differently.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Just okay., July 3, 2014
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This review is from: Paper Towns (Kindle Edition)
Good but not great. I really liked Q but felt as though he was far too good for Margo. So that made it hard for me to feel super invested in the book since it sort of revolves around her. I like John Green as an author though but TFIOS was far superior if I were to compare.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great read., May 26, 2014
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This review is from: Paper Towns (Kindle Edition)
I am addicted to John Green. I have now read 4 of his books. They are all great. He is so funny. He knows how to tell a story. I am a senior citizen and great reader but have never really read young adult fiction except for the Book Thief and the Hunger Game Trilogy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars pleasantly surprised, May 31, 2014
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This review is from: Paper Towns (Paperback)
To be honest, I am a book series girl at heart, but i needed a break.... picked this out the same way i make every hard decision - eenie meanie miney moe. I'm so glad fate landed on this book. Such a good read and now i am thoroughly obsessed with john green.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I couldn't stop!!, November 20, 2013
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This review is from: Paper Towns (Kindle Edition)
Went to work with only an hour and a half sleep since I NEEDED to finish it that same night. I couldn't wait to see how it ended. I would love to see this turned into a movie! Favorite John Green book. I need to read it again but take my time and savor it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beauty, May 30, 2014
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This review is from: Paper Towns (Kindle Edition)
This was one of the most thought-provoking books I've ever read. Though it was not as sad as most of John's books, I still wanted to cry at the end due to the sheer beauty of the words written. My God he must be one of the best writers of our generation.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars We're all made of paper.., May 17, 2014
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This review is from: Paper Towns (Kindle Edition)
This is from my 11.5 year old:
A very interesting book about how different people view things differently. It really opened up my eyes about how flimsy and fake society can be, and a simple push can topple everything and get everything out of order.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A lot of research, not many answers, a wonderful book, September 2, 2014
This review is from: Paper Towns (Paperback)
There are so many things to say about this book I literally don't know where to start. I mean, it's one of those books that leave you feeling weird when they're over – like you can't read anything else, because it just wouldn't feel the same. It's one of those books you keep turning around in your hands, trying to figure out another way in now that the story is over. But mostly, it's one of those books that just won't tell you how the story ends. There is no closure, no defined ending. And while this can be extremely frustrating at first, you soon realize it couldn't end any other way. It has to end like this. It has to leave you not knowing, because you spent the entire book not knowing, and it would feel wrong to finally make things clear at the very end.

What I really loved about Paper Towns was the constant feeling of research that spread everywhere in the book. Quentin looking for Margo. Lacey looking for Margo. Margo looking for herself. I love books with quests and actual adventure and action, and this book has it all. It tells a realistic story but gives it the feel of some sort of incredible treasure hunt, with all the clues to follow and the questions to answer and the frustration at not being up to the task. I loved the way Song of Myself by W. Whitman wasn't simply a clue, but was what helped the main character grow and start to see things differently and question himself and his ideas. I loved how the three parts of the book are named after the three theories about humankind Margo, Whitman and Quentin develop, and how each of the sections is so perfectly focused on its – so to call it – theme. I loved the humor in the narration, the way it managed to be funny from the very first page, and to stay amusing without ever getting annoying.

I loved this book, all of it. Even though I didn't quite understand Margo in all her shades. Even though the ending is fuzzy and I will never know what exactly happened. I loved it, and the only reason I would never be able to pick a favorite between this and Looking for Alaska – which is the only other book by John Green I've read and loved so far – is that, if you look closely, they tell very similar stories. In both, the normal, boring guy (Quentin and Miles) sets out on a wild goose chase to understand what exactly happened to the smart, out of the box and possibly crazy, dark-haired girl who was such a big part of his life (Margo and Alaska). That being said, while the skeleton of both stories is very similar, what's built around it makes these two books different and unique and impossible to choose between.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The plot and metaphors are the reasons why I love this book, August 8, 2014
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heidi sammons (newport beach, ca United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Paper Towns (Paperback)
Paper Towns
The book Paper Towns by John Green is a moving work of interpretive fiction, and there are two main reasons why this literature spoke to me. The plot and metaphors are the reasons why I love this book.
John Green’s book Paper Towns had an exquisite plot. This book is about a boy named Quentin Jacobsen who lives in Orlando, Florida. His neighbor, Margo Roth Spiegelman has to do with most of this fascinating mystery novel. Quentin, or "Q" as he's known, has been in love with Margo since they were little kids. In the beginning of the story, Margo and Q were both young and as they were roaming through Jefferson Park they find the corpse of a man named Robert Joyner, who had committed suicide. After this prologue, the novel flashes forward to Margo and Q in high school, but they have grown apart. One night Margo shows up at Q ‘s window dressed like a ninja and convinces him to sneak out and get revenge on the people she feels have hurt her. It is about 3:15AM when Q and margo are at the top of the Sun Trust building looking down from the windows, this is when Margo calls Orlando a paper town for the first time. She describes paper towns as fake and soft. They end up breaking into Sea World and dance slowly to the music still playing. After that exciting night she disappears. In the course of months, Q is desperately trying to find Margo with the help of his close friends. Margo leaves clues for Q and he is now sent on a “ wild goose chase" to find her. On the day of Graduation, he finds out that she is hiding in an abandoned town in New York called Agloe. They skip graduation and drive 21 hours to New York. When they find her, she is in a barn and tells them that she never wanted to be found. Q's freinds go back to the car but he stays there. He is furious and they get into a big fight. After they realize they are being childish they decide to walk along the grass next to the barn. They kiss and they talk about seeing people for who they really are. In the end Q sees Margo for who she truly is.
This magnificent book has profoundly moving metaphors. The whole book is about metaphors and is split into individual parts named after metaphors. One of the moving metaphors is about how we are all vessels. People leave us or they don’t love us, and we get hurt- we start to crack open. In the end Q sees Margo when she’s fallen apart, and she is “cracked” open; he can see her for who she really is, not the idea of her. When we meet each other for the first time, we see ideas of each other but when we start to fall apart and crack open, that is our true self.
Another metaphor that really changed the way I think was the grass. The grass is about how we are all different on the outside but if you look on the inside, or below the surface you can see that all of our roots are connected and humanity is interconnected. Grass made me think about how humanity has a deep bond even though we are all different people.
The last metaphor that made me think about life is “the Strings.” The strings are about how we all have delicate internal strings that make us like an instrument. Our whole life we play the strings of our instrument but when we get hurt and feel a lot of pain, strings break; when we die all of the strings break. This makes me think about how we choose to feel pain. We can think of life as strings that break and become un-fixable problems leading to death / suicide, or we could think of life as grass and that we are all connected in the inside by deep roots even though we are different on the outside.
In the conclusion of the mystery novel Paper Towns, most people would say that it is unresolved. Many readers didn’t like the way characters were left unfinished in the end. The point of Quentin finding her was to understand who she truly was and not just know the idea of her, and in the ending he accomplishes that. He finds out that she has many problems and wanted to get away from it all, despite being so popular. The author leaves the reader to conclude this. I recommend this book for people who like interpretive fiction because the author leaves many things unresolved. I really enjoyed both the plot and metaphors in Paper Towns.
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Paper Towns
Paper Towns by John Green (Paperback - September 22, 2009)
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