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Paradise Lost

October 11, 2011 | Format: MP3

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Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity Prime  
30
1
4:30
30
2
2:46
30
3
3:34
30
4
3:00
30
5
4:43
30
6
3:03
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3:41
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8
3:21
30
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3:25
30
10
3:02
30
11
3:54
30
12
2:57
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Format: Audio CD
When Leftover Salmon went on hiatus, many of us mourned, but wondered what the band members would do with their time. Mandolin player Drew Emmitt followed in the footsteps of one of his idols, Sam Bush, to play around in the grey area between country, rock and bluegrass. Good stuff. What would Vince Herman do, though? He formed Great American Taxi, which has turned out to be as surprising as it is amazing.

Leftover Salmon formed with the merging of Emmitt's Left Hand String Band and Herman's The Salmonheads. The former was a progressive bluegrass band, and the latter was a Cajun band. The name of the band was an obvious merging of the constituent band names, and the resulting sound made sense too. "Polyethnic Cajun slamgrass" is exactly what you would expect when a progressive bluegrass band merges with a Cajun band. So, when Emmitt goes off on his own, it makes sense that he would return to his roots, which he did. Based on that, one would have expected Vince Herman to go back to playing Cajun music. Vince had other ideas. Big ideas. Great American Taxi sounds nothing like Leftover Salmon. Herman is using it as a vehicle to explore a blending of the kind of southern R&B/blues/rock of Little Feat and the country rock of early pioneers like Commander Cody or Gram Parsons. In addition to the top-notch players Herman has assembled for the core of the band, this album boasts appearances by two names that are hopefully already familiar to readers-- Tim O'Brien and Todd Snider. The result, like the band's previous album (Reckless Habits), is a minor masterpiece. The band plays effectively, but concisely without any hint of self-indulgence, and that loose, Little Feat feeling runs all through the music, even in the more rural, folk/country moments.
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