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Paradise Lost and Other Poems Hardcover – January 1, 1942


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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Walter J. Black (1942)
  • ASIN: B0010C3TVE
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 5.6 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #8,850,997 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

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This is by far the best paperback edition of Paradise Lost.
greenhornet
For a long time, I have wanted to read Milton's "Paradise Lost" (yes, I, a nineteen-year-old male, wanting to read Milton outside of class).
DanD
These characters interact with the more traditional Christian characters of Adam, Eve, Satan, various angels, and God.
FrKurt Messick

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By DanD VINE VOICE on January 31, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
For a long time, I have wanted to read Milton's "Paradise Lost" (yes, I, a nineteen-year-old male, wanting to read Milton outside of class). I'm glad I chose this Signet Classic version. You know what "Paradise Lost" is about, or you wouldn't be here, so I won't summarize what has become an essential piece of epic poetry. "Samson Agonistes" is a beautiful "minor epic" styled after the ancient Greek tragedies, while "Lycidas" is...well, it's confusing. But exquisitely worded, and truly enjoyable nonetheless.

Le Comte's annotations are helpful, though they sometimes get in the way of the reading (in many spots, half the page is devoted to footnotes). Cifelli's introductions are easy to read (I've come across some introductions to pieces of literature that are harder to read than the literature itself, so these intros were a relief), and even helpful in understanding the texts. The fact of the matter is this: unless you are an academic schooled in interpreting Biblical poetry, you're gonna have a hard time with "Paradise Lost" (Cifelli echoes these remarks, so I'm not alone here). However, trust me, it is worth it. If you are a student (as am I), or simply an interested reader (as I also am), you will love "Paradise Lost"--not for its simplicity, but for its complexity, for its beauty. This Signet Classic edition is helpful and enjoyable; read it, and enjoy.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 27, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Thanks to Edward Le Comte's great biographical introduction, and annotations, this is the best version of this classic work. Unfortunately it is hard to find, because it's 42 years old now. This old Mentor edition was a high quality printing though, so if you find one it stands a good chance of being a best buy!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Chosroes III on September 30, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
A superb edition of the greatest poem in the language. Edward Le Comte performs an invaluable job of editing, providing copious annotations which give an encyclopedic overview of Milton's Biblical, Classical, theological, and personal allusions throughout "Paradise Lost" as well as "Samson Agonistes" and "Lycidas", which are the other poems of the title. The back-cover write-up gets it right-- here is the indispensable peer of Vergil, Dante, Homer. These are poetic monuments, cathedrals of sound and sense that are bound to exhilarate anyone who gives them even passing attention: Milton's reverence, rage, and sensuality burn through each line. Never mind even Harold Bloom's protestations to the contrary-- the poetry of the English tradition revolves around a double star, and this is Shakespeare's giant twin in greatness.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By FrKurt Messick HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 1, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Of Man's first disobedience and the fruit

Of that forbidden tree whose mortal taste

Brought death into the world and all our woe,

With loss of Eden, till on greater Man

Restore us and regain the blissful seat

Sing, Heavenly Muse...

Not a lot people know that 'Paradise Lost' has as a much lesser known companion piece 'Paradise Regained'; of course, it was true during Milton's time as it is today that the more harrowing and juicy the story, the better it will likely be remembered and received.

This is not to cast any aspersion on this great poem, however. It has been called, with some justification, the greatest English epic poem. The line above, the first lines of the first book of the poem, is typical of the style throughout the epic, in vocabulary and syntax, in allusiveness. The word order tends toward the Latinate, with the object coming first and the verb coming after.

Milton follows many classical examples by personifying characters such as Death, Chaos, Mammon, and Sin. These characters interact with the more traditional Christian characters of Adam, Eve, Satan, various angels, and God. He takes as his basis the basic biblical text of the creation and fall of humanity (thus, 'Paradise Lost'), which has taken such hold in the English-speaking world that many images have attained in the popular mind an almost biblical truth to them (in much the same way that popular images of Hell owe much to Dante's Inferno). The text of Genesis was very much in vogue in the mid-1600s (much as it is today) and Paradise Lost attained an almost instant acclaim.
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