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Parallelities Paperback – March 1, 1995


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Del Rey (March 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0345483588
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345483584
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 5.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,543,599 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Inside Flap

"It seems you have acquired about you a field that affects the links between multiple parallel worlds, causing objects and individuals from these worlds to slip into yours . . . or you to slip into theirs . . ."

It was just an average day for tabloid reporter Max Parker when he arrived in Malibu for a demonstration of a brand new parallel-universe machine. But everything changed in an instant when inventor Barrington Boles succeeded in making Max the human gate to numerous parallelities.

Now Max was lost in a virtual sea of collateral worlds, confronting man-eating aliens, dinosaurs, talking frogs, dead Maxes, girl Maxes, old Maxes, even ghost Maxes. His only chance to escape the space-time continuum was to find Boles and hope the loony genius could rescue him. But how could he be sure which world was real, which Max was Max, and which Boles was the Boles who could stop the madness--or trap Max in the wrong world forever. . . ? --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Alan Dean Foster was born in New York City in 1946 and raised in Los Angeles, California. After receiving a bachelor's degree in political science and a master of fine arts degree in motion pictures from UCLA in 1968-69, he worked for two years as a public relations copywriter in Studio City, California.

He sold his first short story to August Derleth at Arkham Collector magazine in 1968, and additional sales of short fiction to other magazines followed. His first try at a novel, The Tar-Aiym Krang, was published by Ballantine Books in 1972.  Since then, Foster has published many short stories, novels, and film novelizations, including the New York Times bestselling Splinter of the Mind's Eye and Flinx in Flux.

Foster has toured extensively around the world. Besides traveling, he enjoys classical and rock music, old films, basketball, bodysurfing, and weightlifting. He has taught screenwriting, literature, and film history at UCLA and Los Angeles City College.  He and his wife live in Arizona.


From the Paperback edition.

More About the Author

Alan Dean Foster's work to date includes excursions into hard science-fiction, fantasy, horror, detective, western, historical, and contemporary fiction. He has also written numerous non-fiction articles on film, science, and scuba diving, as well as having produced the novel versions of many films, including such well-known productions as "Star Wars", the first three "Alien" films, "Alien Nation", and "The Chronicles of Riddick". Other works include scripts for talking records, radio, computer games, and the story for the first "Star Trek" movie. His novel "Shadowkeep" was the first ever book adapation of an original computer game. In addition to publication in English his work has been translated into more than fifty languages and has won awards in Spain and Russia. His novel "Cyber Way" won the Southwest Book Award for Fiction in 1990, the first work of science-fiction ever to do so.

Foster's sometimes humorous, occasionally poignant, but always entertaining short fiction has appeared in all the major SF magazines as well as in original anthologies and several "Best of the Year" compendiums. His published oeuvre includes more than 100 books.


Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Kylopod on May 5, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I see this book has received a mixed response from fans, and this surprises me. I found this to be one of the most entertaining reads in a long while. I keep reading it over and over, sometimes skipping to my favorite parts and analyzing the details for further insight.
Following a rather slow beginning (I'd almost suggest skipping the first chapter), we encounter a slimy tabloid reporter who, due to an experiment run amok by an amateur scientist he's sent to interview, becomes doomed to sail randomly through parallel universes, many of which are at least as weird as the kinds of stories he writes for the tabloid paper. Each of these universes contains another version of himself, living life without any awareness of anything strange going on around him. (That is not the only one of the reporter's new "powers," but I don't want to give away the most original aspect of this novel.)
What I love about all of Foster's books is that his descriptions are so vivid, he makes the comically absurd seem almost plausible. You feel like you've lived in one of his books after reading it. Not only does he revel in verbose descriptions, he always seems to be pushing the limits of what's possible to put into words. His stories are often filled with "shocker lines," not all of which work, but are nonetheless very enjoyable.
In "Parallelities," each universe the reporter protagonist visits seems to encompass a story in itself, and in the process the book manages to cross several genres, leaving open more questions than it answers. The book is hilarious, because the reporter keeps convincing himself he's finally back in his own world, but we know he's only fooling himself.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Kenneth R. Bridges on February 12, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
An author should not have to stamp "satire" on the cover of a book to have readers look at it in the proper light. Parallelities is a light satire which has many clever twists. I found this book much more enjoyable than the lionized "Hitchhiker's Guide".
Foster begins with an aura that suggests the standard serious SF genre. However, the book quickly becomes a light-hearted ride thorough a series of unreal universes. The writing is crisp, with many "tongue-in-cheek" situations. I agree that Mr.Foster began to fade a bit toward the end. However, the book overall provided a pleasant afternoon's reading. This is not "Dune" or even "Hyperion", but is not meant to be.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 1, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This was the first book by Alan Dean Foster that I have ever read, and I must say I am impressed. I usually read books of Tom Clancy and Clive Cussler variety, but I was bored and it was there. As I started to read I was immediatly brought into a world where, at least for one man, the whole world changes in a second. So it's a desperate struggle for him to try and discover who he really is, and where he is really from. Along the way he encounters aliens, ghosts, other versions of himself (including a female one), and even a world occupied entirely by versions of himself!!! I enjoyed the small bits of humour thrown in and the actual science was kept to minimum. I highly suggest this book, no matter what you usually read, you will enjoy it!!!!!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 8, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book is definitely Foster. If you are paying attention - and who wants to do that reading Sci-Fi - you can pick out some insights to that theme Foster has been leading us to for twenty years. In this story you find some insights to that mysterious evil that seems to be lurking at the edge of all of his novels. Finally, we get a glimpse of those aliens who fled the evil. For those of us who love and follow Flinx, you will get a treat.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Marge Reynolds on January 4, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is my favorite book of Foster because I find it to be the one that expands my mind the most. It also made me laugh at times as the main character encounters numerous odd situations and beings. A stimulating mix of physics, philosophy, science, humor, and big thoughts. Parallel universes and humor. This reminds me a little bit of Heinlein's work.
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