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Pardon Me, You're Stepping On My Eyeball Mass Market Paperback – August 1, 1993


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 960L (What's this?)
  • Mass Market Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Starfire (August 1, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 055326690X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553266900
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.1 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #988,356 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Fifteen-year-old "Marsh" Mellow thinks the whole world hates him. Then he meets Edna Shinglebox, a classmate who looks as freaky and depressed as he is. Even though Marsh writes hate letters, carries around a raccoon in his coat pocket, and insults Edna constantly, Edna still likes him. After embarking on an incredible adventure that takes them halfway across the country, Edna and Marsh are surprised by what they learn about themselves and each other.

From the Inside Flap

Fifteen-year-old "Marsh" Mellow thinks  the whole world hates him. Then he meets Edna  Shinglebox, a classmate who looks as freaky and  depressed as he is. Even though Marsh writes hate  letters, carries around a raccoon in his coat pocket,  and insults Edna constantly, Edna still likes him.  After embarking on an incredible adventure that  takes them halfway across the country, Edna and Marsh  are surprised by what they learn about themselves  and each other.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By V. Charbonneau on January 27, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
"Pardon Me, You're Stepping on My Eyeball!" was the third book I read by Paul Zindel. The story revolves around fifteen year-old Louis "Marsh" Mellow and Edna Shinglebox. Both have weird parents and have trouble fitting in at school. Marsh's mother, whom he nicknames Schizo Suzy, is a drunk who stays at home in her polka-dot nightgown drinking diet beer and eating cashew nuts while watching T.V. Edna's mother is a hysterical woman who shadowed her daughter for years and is upset that Edna has not dated yet and has no friends. Marsh and Edna meet in group-therapy, set up by the the school's pushy, three-hundred pound psychologist, Mr. Meizner. There Marsh asks Edna to help rescue his father, Paranoid Pete, from a nuthouse. While "My Darling, My Hamburger" and "The Girl Who Wanted a Boy" left me feeling depressed at the end, this book has a healthy dose of humour to lighten the mood. The story is basically about reaching out, overcoming fear and loneliness and finding someone to love, share and trust.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 15, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I admit that I am getting a little old for young adult novels. I found this book at a rummage sale, because the title caught my eye... I started to read and and couldn't put it down. Zindel's words flow beautifully, and are spiced with all sorts of quirks. the ending was perfect, wrapping up everything but still believable and not cheesey. I highly recommend this book, and I don't say that often
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 2, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book kept me laughing, yet it also explores the human mind. An awesome book, which I'd reccomend to anybody who didn't have a fear of strange titles. =)
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on August 26, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Paul Zindel strikes again with another literary marvel. This book is plain fun, and it's very easy to relate to the character of Edna Shinglebox (although, thank God, my parents are nothing like hers). Marsh is a very interesting character, and the book is typical Zindel fare. It's a lot of fun, and very, very interesting. It's a very good character study.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 1, 1997
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This was a great book. It dealt with two people that needed help and they got that help from each other. Very touching
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By E. S. Charpentier on February 9, 2014
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Edna Shinglebox and Louis “Marsh” Mellow are disaffected youth in the mid-1970s. When they are enrolled in a group therapy class at school they come to know each other and maybe help with each other’s emotional problems.
Everything in this book is bizarre, from Marsh’s stories his and his father’s exploits with women to Edna’s visit to a local psychic. The descriptions are wacky and vivid and very representative of the time period and the youth scene. Marsh and Edna are fully-realized characters, if a bit over-dramatic. It is likely that the intended audience for this book no longer exists, but a modern teen reader might appreciate getting a sense of teens and their struggles in a prior time period.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I've owned this book since 1979 when I was 11 years old. I've gone back and read it multiple times, each time discovering something new as I got older and I just read it again this past weekend. It is really about love and friendship and honesty and overcoming pain and fear. It is about growing up too, and the things teenagers all deal with: trying to fit in, feeling misunderstood, feeling alone, pretending to be someone else in order to be accepted or liked. I love how flawed the two main characters are and yet I fell in love with both of them, especially Marsh, who is hilarious and filled with so much pain.

I do not agree with the publisher's summary of the book. I don't think Marsh believes the world hates him. He hates his life, he hates himself, and he just needs someone like Edna who is overcoming some of the same issues and can help him through it. It's about reaching out and trusting in someone, it is about being honest with yourself, it is about facing reality rather than avoiding it.
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By Privacy, Please on March 25, 2010
Format: Hardcover
In this book, Paul Zindel seems to have read M.E. Kerr's "Dinky Hocker" and decided to get a little bit little wacky. Two misfit teens with crazy names, "Marsh" Mellow and Edna Shinglebox, find solace in each other while escaping their respective weird parents. While the parents in other Zindel books like "My Darling, My Hamburger" and "The Pigman" were just absent or darkly dysfunctional, here the parents's characters are more like crazy caricatures. One part of the book even has the teens teaming up to rescue Marsh's dad from a mental institution. Because of the funny names and other humorous elements, this book is both lighter and a little less true-to-life than "Pigman" and "Hamburger", as well as being less dated.

I must say I was disappointed that Zindel reused a concept from "The Pigman" - the teenage houseparty gone way bad, with disastrous results - as a climax of this book as well. That seemed a bit lazy to me.
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