Pardon And Peace and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $12.95
  • Save: $1.82 (14%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: --- Pages have no markings - All items are guaranteed to be in said or better condition ---
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Pardon and Peace: A Sinner's Guide to Confession Paperback – March 1, 2001


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$11.13
$7.49 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"


Frequently Bought Together

Pardon and Peace: A Sinner's Guide to Confession + 7 Secrets of Confession
Price for both: $21.39

One of these items ships sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together
  • 7 Secrets of Confession $10.26

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 130 pages
  • Publisher: Ignatius Press (March 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 089870832X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0898708325
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.2 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,173,859 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
5 star
5
4 star
2
3 star
1
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 9 customer reviews
It was full of great information!
G'ma
If you have been away from confession for a long time this would be a good book to give one confidence and knowledge before seeing the priest on this vital sacrament.
P. Berndt
Randolph has written a guide that is sorely needed in order to renew the role of this sacrament in the Church.
Oswald Sobrino

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Scott Walter on February 22, 2002
Format: Paperback
In this well-organized book the author writes clear, straightforward prose that provides wise and kind-hearted guidance to the much-misunderstood sacrament of confession.
The book is valuable for persons who aren't Catholic or Christian but want to understand the Biblical and historical origins of Confession. It is also quite helpful to anyone new to the Church and unsure of how to confess, or to a lapsed Catholic considering a return. Even a Catholic who regularly goes to Confession will find it most helpful and enlightening.
The contents include both excellent practical guidance in what and how to confess, and also concise explanations of the history and disputes surrounding Confession, including the notorious topic of Indulgences (which turn out to be far more reasonable in their origins than you are likely to realize, even though they eventually became a source of corruption the Church had to reform).
The author is associated with one of the religious communities known as Oratories that the brilliant convert John Henry Newman established in England, which helps to explain both his admirable writing style and his well-balanced spirituality--he avoids the extremes of harshness and lazy indifference.
As the author makes clear, Christ established Confession not to burden us with guilt but rather as an honorable way to relieve us of guilt so that we might approach the holy joy of the saints: "I came that they may have life, and have it abundantly."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Oswald Sobrino on January 4, 2003
Format: Paperback
Fr. Randolph has written a highly useful work for Catholics who regularly use the sacrament of penance and for those Catholics who are coming back to the sacrament after much neglect. He provides topical advice relevant for today's society. For example, he gives guidance on the common situation in which people realize years later that their prior lifestyle was in fact gravely sinful. His recommendation is that, in spite of their lack of knowledge, they should still bring these sins to confession. This situation in which many people can actually be ignorant of gravely sinful conduct, especially sexual conduct, is common today among younger generations because the wider society now accepts as normal what the Christian moral tradition has always viewed as seriously wrong. This particular situation is but one example of the instances where Fr. Randolph gives needed advice for today's Catholic. When so many pulpits are unfortunately silent on the need for the regular use of this sacrament, Fr. Randolph has written a guide that is sorely needed in order to renew the role of this sacrament in the Church.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By C. Bennett VINE VOICE on January 9, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Fr. Francis Randolph takes a practical and personable approach to the sacrament of confession. This is a helpful book for Catholics who have been away from the sacrament for some time, or for Catholics who are wondering if they go too often ("scruples").
The book is structured into eleven chapters, encompassing the entire form of the sacrament. From "Bless me Father for I have sinned" to "the merits of the Blessed Virgin Mary," Fr. Randolph explains both the form and meaning of each part of the sacrament.
Mixed in with the theological and canonical discussions, Fr. Randolph brings in the practical experience he has, from ministering to a large congregation in England. Fr. Randolph shares humerous and poignant stories, engaging the reader in an otherwise dry topic. Fr. Randolph takes pains to explain the changes since Vatican II, and encourages Catholics to engage in the new forms. He also addresses common questions such as, "how often should I go to confession?" and "what is a sin?".
This is a worthwhile read for all Catholics who want to understand confession. At 185 pages, it is a short but valuable addition to Catholic studies.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Alcuin Reid on February 11, 2008
Format: Paperback
There is little doubt that, in the past forty years, the Sacrament of Penance's importance has diminished in the practice of the faith of many Catholics. There is also the more than alarming fact that many young Catholics born in those forty years have had little if any formation in the meaning and importance of this sacrament. These unhappy phenomena explain the many calls for a revival in the practice of individual confession with which the pontificate of Pope John Paul II was permeated. Francis Randolph's Pardon and Peace: A Sinner's Guide to Confession is a practical response to the urgent need for a renewal of teaching about and the practice of this sacrament.

Randolph works systematically through the various parts of the sacrament, elucidating their meaning and giving the practical advice that only and experienced confessor could give. The author also draws from his experience as a penitent, resulting in a book which provides an appreciation of confession from both sides of the grille.

The book strongly, and wisely, advocates frequent confession, warning that abandoning this salutary practice is "an easy trap to fall into, the idea that because we are not conscious of committing any sins worth talking about, we do not need to go to confession." Randolph likens this to people who stop taking their prescribed medication and then wonder why they are no longer well. "It is the same with regular confession," he asserts. "If we stop doing it because we think we are now so perfect that we do not need it any more, we may not notice the deterioration in our behaviour, but everyone else will."

Randolph is refreshingly clear that general absolution is "an insult to the people" which if "done in defiance of the clear instructions of the Church...
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?