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Paris, I Love You but You're Bringing Me Down Hardcover – April 24, 2012


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Paris, I Love You but You're Bringing Me Down + Stuff Parisians Like: Discovering the Quoi in the Je Ne Sais Quoi + The Sweet Life in Paris: Delicious Adventures in the World's Most Glorious - and Perplexing - City
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux; First Edition edition (April 24, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0374146683
  • ISBN-13: 978-0374146689
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 5.8 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (72 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #458,266 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

When Baldwin lands a job with a French advertising agency, he and his wife trade Brooklyn for Paris and 18 months of opportunities seized, the idea being that his nine-to-five will support their otherwise writerly lives in the European capital. Maybe not naively, but idealistically, they aren’t anticipating some of the hurdles: an irrevocably bureaucratic infrastructure that turns most transactions into piles of paper and weeks of waiting, or an apartment surrounded on six sides by neighbors’ construction work. Baldwin works on his first novel (You Lost Me There, 2010) before and after work at the agency—a superlative fishbowl of characters who are so well remembered that one wonders when the author decided to write a memoir of the experience, in fact—until he’s satisfied, and the novel is picked up by a U.S. publisher. Baldwin proves that with the right attitude, everything in this perhaps most magically remembered of all cities is either beautiful, hilarious, or both, and his friendly voice and approachable style will grab those who want to be there and those who have never been. --Annie Bostrom

Review

“A charming entry into the expat canon, this book is Baldwin’s true story of moving to his favorite city in the world — favorite to the tune of obsession, mind you — and realizing it’s not quite as he had imagined.”—Emily Temple, Flavorwire

Baldwin proves that with the right attitude, everything in this perhaps most magically remembered of all cities is either beautiful, hilarious, or both, and his friendly voice and approachable style will grab those who want to be there and those who have never been.” — Annie Bostrom, Booklist

“A charming, hilarious account of la vie Parisienne as experienced by  an observant young American . . . his vivid impressions of Paris and its people (expats included) are most engaging. Great fun and surprisingly touching. Great fun and surprisingly touching.” —Kirkus (starred review)

Paris, I Love You but You're Bringing Me Down is a charming, hilarious, keenly-observed and surprisingly poignant journey into the Parisian state of mind. I read it late at night and kept waking up my wife because I was laughing out loud.” —Anthony Doerr, author of Memory Wall and Four Seasons in Rome

 

More About the Author

Rosecrans Baldwin's is the author of "Paris, I Love You but You're Bringing Me Down" (GQ's Best Books of 2012) and "You Lost Me There" (NPR's Best Books 2010, New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice). His Kindle-edition article, "Our French Connection," was selected as a Notable Essay for "Best American Essays 2013." He is a co-founder of the online magazine The Morning News.

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Customer Reviews

Really fun read.
kfan
Mr. Baldwin was very engaging with his honesty, and dry "all in fun" sarcastic humor with his experiences and perception of Paris.
Michele A. Rios
I found this book rather dull.
Shania

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 33 people found the following review helpful By C. on April 26, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book, was real, hilarious and evoked the romance of living in Paris but with the realities of Living in Paris. Even if you have not lived in Paris ( I have for very short stints), you can appreciate the idea of being a foreigner even in a place as friendly and western as Paris.

The author style is fluid and so familiar you will breeze through this book as if he was telling you his story in person.

Best book I have read all year.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Graham Bell on June 8, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
As someone who is planning on going on a "Big Trip" of my own soon, I was naturally drawn to these sorts of travel books. The unfortunate part of this book is that while it's very well written, it's actually kind of boring. Mr. Baldwin does his best to spice it up with some wit and humour, but even as MOST of the jokes land, you can't help but feel like nothing is really going on. Simply put, this book has no hook. There are no huge moments, no insights that you couldn't get from reading a site on the net or watching an episode of No Reservations. That such a flat story can be told in a way that compels you to finish the book is a testament to Rosencrans Baldwin's ability as an author. His descriptions are well written and suitably flowery for a book about Paris, and the dialog is punchy. I would genuinely love to read something by Mr. Baldwin where something actually happens. As for this book, though, read it for the beautiful descriptions of Paris, but the rest is pretty blah.
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18 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Mark Wayne on April 29, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I like books about the French that contrast the differences between America and France without overly bashing either county. Hey, we just think differently. It helped that he and his wife moved there while still in their 20s; they were open-minded and adventurous. He's a good writer and that makes this non-fiction read like a story with characters, like Bruno, his oh-so-French co-worker. It made me laugh, and I read it in a day.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Rushmore VINE VOICE on June 21, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
What this is: a rather funny, edgy memoir of a guy and his wife who lived in Paris for a while. The guy worked in advertising and wrote a novel. His wife looked for ways to keep busy.

What this is not: the definitive portrait of life in Paris for Americans.

Rosecrans Baldwin is a funny guy with an unusual name, and he gets an opportunity with all kinds of funny possibilities: he is offered a position in an advertising agency in Paris. He is supposed to bring the American viewpoint. People in advertising often have a reputation for being, shall we say, quirky, and Baldwin's co-workers definitely are. The situation is exacerbated by the fact that his first ad campaign is about breastfeeding, so he is surrounded by images of breasts all day long. So OK, the humor is not particularly subtle.

Rosecrans and his wife Rachel build a circle of friends. They go to parties. They eat French food and drink French wine. And after a while they decide they are ready to go back to America - not really a spoiler in view of the title.

It's a funny book, but not laugh-out-loud funny for me. Being of the female persuasion, when I read memoirs by married men I often find myself wishing for more of the wife in the story. Unfortunately for Rachel, she is not as quirky as some of the other people in Rosecrans's orbit. She is not neglected exactly. She has a really beautiful moment in this narrative. But really it's mostly about him.

After a glut of reverent memoirs about buying villas in Tuscany and Provence, this book is a refreshing change.

I do recommend it for anyone who's curious about what it's really like to live in Paris, or just generally to be an expat. It's a well-told story with plenty of funny details.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Mullineaux on January 28, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Personally I thought the author was trying too hard here. Cute story but one I wouldn't mind hearing from a friend over lunch, not investing hours in a book for. Reccomend passing on this one..
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Lynn S on May 29, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I'm currently living in Paris, and I found many of the author's insights to be right on target. (For instance, I've seen more women crying in public in 2 years than I've seen in the States in my whole life). I gave the book 4 stars because I didn't love his writing style (too many metaphors, sentences akin to "the summer sun was a mandarin"). That said, I read it extremely quickly, and found it to be a good summer travel read.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful By SBB on May 26, 2012
Format: Hardcover
A friend left this book at my place and I picked it up and couldn't put it down. I've read Paris to the Moon, and loved it, but this book felt like it could have been me living this life in Paris. Baldwin is dry funny, warm, evocative, spot on, challenging and is honest about Paris in a way that makes you love it even more, because now you are allowed to acknowledge its faults as openly as its beauty. That's true love. Thanks Rosecrans, I love your book as much as I love Paris. A lot.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By jw on December 27, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Boring, insufferable. Like boring insufferable magazine prose. For better prose on Paris read: Stuff Parisians Like: Discovering the Quoi in the Je Ne Sais Quoi .
by Olivier Magny
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