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79 of 85 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Je t'aime!
Paris is a city of light, lovers, art and beauty. And "Paris, Je T'aime" explores all the sides of the city in in eighteen brief fiolms, all set in various arrondissements of Paris, and directed by some brilliantly underrated directors. And they seem to be about love -- often it's a person, but each one is also an ode to Paris itself.

A somewhat lonely Denver...
Published on May 30, 2007 by E. A Solinas

versus
30 of 30 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Footnote on the subtitling
Those with large-screen HDTVs have something of a dilemma here. The Blu-ray version is sharper and more beautiful to look at than the DVD, but it is marred by excessively large and intrusive subtitling for the hearing-impaired. Subtitling is a necessary evil for those of us who do not have a fluent understanding of French, but those of us with hearing do not need to have...
Published on August 23, 2011 by D. DEGEORGE


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79 of 85 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Je t'aime!, May 30, 2007
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Paris is a city of light, lovers, art and beauty. And "Paris, Je T'aime" explores all the sides of the city in in eighteen brief fiolms, all set in various arrondissements of Paris, and directed by some brilliantly underrated directors. And they seem to be about love -- often it's a person, but each one is also an ode to Paris itself.

A somewhat lonely Denver mailwoman (Margo Martindale) makes her first trip to Paris, and recounts how "I fell in love with Paris, and Paris fell in love with me." A mime spreads colour and mischief on his way to love. Two strangers fall in love in a bar. A medic learns that a dying man is in love with her, and seeking her out inadvertantly led to his death at the hands of a racist gang.

A young boy leaves his misogynistic pals behind, to seek love with a young Muslim girl. A pair of British people visit the tomb of Oscar Wilde in Pere-Lachaise, an American actress falls for her drug dealer, and a young nanny's dismal living conditions are a stark contrast to that of the people she works for. All these -- and more -- are intertwined gently in the finale.

But two stand out especially. Tom Tykwer's includes a young blind man (Melchior Beslon) receiving a call from his American actress girlfriend (Natalie Portman). She tells him, "Our spring was wonderful but summer is over now and we missed out on autumn... our love fell asleep, and the snow took it by surprise." In his sorrow, he thinks back to how they met, and how their relationship continued... and gets a surprise.

And Vincenzo Natali turns in a bloody, gothic love story. A young American tourist (Elijah Wood) is walking alone at night, when he steps in a pool of blood. He follows the blood to where a beautiful vampire (Olga Kurylenko) is slurping someone to death -- only to have a sudden attraction bloom up between them. When he has a fall, what will happen?

"Paris Je T'aime" has it all -- comedy, tragedy, romance, racial tension, religion, vampires, sunlit vacations, glamour and cliches. Okay, there's the occasional dud -- "Tuileries," about an American tourist by the Coen Bros., is just lame. But since all the directors are given only about five minutes, most of them are tiny, polished gems without any extraneous material.

Natali's is colourless (except for blood) and eerie, Gurinder Chadha's is shyly sweet and sunny, Richard LaGravenese's is adorable, Craven's is syrupy, and Tykwer's is a delicate web of camera tricks and blurred glimpses. Sylvain Chomet even charms us with mimes zooming through the streets. And each brings another dimension of Paris to life, from lush green parks to bars to the Eiffel Tower itself.

And the acting is just as great -- the great Juliette Binoche, Seydou Boro, Catalina Moreno, Marianne Faithfull, Fanny Ardant, Gérard Depardieu, and the adorable Melchior Beslon. Martindale deserves special praise for her sweetly realistic portrayal of an American tourist, and Portman is brilliantly vibrant as a girl who yells a lot. And Elijah Wood turns out a brilliant performance in total silence, managing to convey fear, mischief, eroticism and love.

"Paris Je T'aime" is a collection of little gems, with the occasional dull pebble thrown in -- brilliant directors, emotionally charged stories, and great acting. Enchanté!
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30 of 30 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Footnote on the subtitling, August 23, 2011
By 
D. DEGEORGE (Ellicott City, MD USA) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Paris, je t'aime [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
Those with large-screen HDTVs have something of a dilemma here. The Blu-ray version is sharper and more beautiful to look at than the DVD, but it is marred by excessively large and intrusive subtitling for the hearing-impaired. Subtitling is a necessary evil for those of us who do not have a fluent understanding of French, but those of us with hearing do not need to have every sound effect explicated, nor English subtitles for those bits of this film that are spoken in English. Although the subtitling is larger than it needs to be, I would still recommend the Blu-ray version for those who are not bothered by what amounts to closed-captioning rather than standard subtitling. You're also in luck if you can read Spanish, for which standard subtitles are available.

My aggravation with the Blu-ray subtitling led me to do some research, including the reviews here at Amazon; and I found contradictory and ambiguous remarks regarding the subtitling available on the DVD, which is entirely understandable because the DVD itself is confusing in this regard. To resolve the matter, I rented a copy of the DVD; and the following are my findings, which I hope will clear this up for customers:

If you simply play the movie on DVD without going through subtitle setup, you will see normal English subtitles; however, if you go through setup, you will see only a choice between Spanish and English SDH (or "Off"); and if you choose English SDH, you are stuck with the extraneous and distracting information on screen. The main reason that I am writing this footnote of a review is to say that, in spite of the labeling on the package, and in spite of the explicit choices on the Setup Menu, there are--on the DVD only--*four* subtitle options; to access them you simply have to use the subtitle button on your remote control while the disc is playing. There you will find that you can choose "English," "Spanish," "English," or "Off." That's right: there are two labeled "English" without differentiation, except for one being numbered (on my player, anyway) #1, and the other #3. On my player #1 was English SDH; and #3 was standard English subtitles.

Please understand that I have nothing against providing English for the Hearing Impaired, and the DVD shows that this can be done without rattling the rest of us; I do not know what the constraints were on the Blu-ray that prevented this sensible approach, nor why First Look Pictures chose to hide the standard-English option on the DVD.

One of the things that was unclear to me in going through the reviews was whether or not one needed to buy the special 2-disc edition in order to get the standard English subtitles. Based upon the fact that my rental disc does not say Disc 1 on it, I assume that it is not from the 2-disc set; furthermore, some of the reviews here and elsewhere have indicated that Disc 1 of the 2-disc set is identical to the single-disc edition. I cannot speak for the Steelbook edition, but I would be surprised if the standard-English-subtitle feature had been removed, which I assume would have been extra effort for Steelbook. Thus, I believe that only the Blu-ray edition suffers from this particular flaw, leaving prospective buyers with the choice of a clearer but more cluttered image on Blu-ray, or a fuzzier but less distracting image on the DVD.

Oh, yes, the movie: I found this collection of short films charming, often whimsical, and sometimes wise; and the Paris scenery ain't bad, either. If I were reviewing the DVD, I would give it four stars, but have docked the Blu-ray a star for its clumsy production.
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53 of 58 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars You'll Always Have Paris..., May 26, 2007
By 
MICHAEL ACUNA (Southern California United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Directed by a slew of the very best directors (Alfonso Cuaron, The Coen Brothers, Gus Van Sant, Alexander Payne to name a few), "Paris Je t'aime" is a mixed bag of short vignettes about the who's, the why's and the wherefore's of love set in the City of Love: Paris.
As is usually the case in this type of enterprise, the directors with the best scripts and the best technique and vision come off the best. The amazing thing is that producers Emmanuel Benbihy and Claudie Ossard have double-handedly breathed new life in what was thought of as a pretty much dead, at least in its commercial art form entity
...the short film, by assembling 18 films made by 21 directors.
In one of the best and most effective and affecting, "Bastille," a man (Sergio Castellito) on the verge of leaving his wife (Miranda Richardson) for his mistress learns that the wife is terminally ill and decides to stay with her. The main character's wall-to-wall stream-of-consciousness takes us through the whole story in voice-over: "by acting like I was in love, I fell in love with my wife again."
In "14ème Arrondissement," directed by Alexander Payne, a middle-aged American mail carrier from Denver, who diligently studied French as she prepared for the trip of a lifetime to Paris, walks around the city sharing her impressions in voice-over. She talks about her lonely life, the beautiful scenery, her happiness at being in Paris but her sadness at having to experience it alone. But, sitting in a Paris park one day she experiences a sudden epiphany: a life affirming and life changing epiphany that she will without a doubt take home with her to Denver.
Acting-wise, along with those mentioned above, Ben Gazzara, Gena Rowlands, Gaspard Ulliel, Juliette Binoche, Steve Buscemi, and Fanny Ardant...organic, deeply committed actors all make the very best of their short but sweet appearances.
Like its literary twin, the short story, the short film has very little time to make an impression and impact and though there are a couple of miss-steps presented here, "Paris Je T'aime" is as a whole a very beautiful, very cohesive, effective and blissfully thoughtful film.
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64 of 73 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Je t'aime!, August 15, 2007
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Paris is a city of light, lovers, art and beauty. And "Paris, Je T'aime" explores all the sides of the city in in eighteen brief fiolms, all set in various arrondissements of Paris, and directed by some brilliantly underrated directors. And they seem to be about love -- often it's a person, but each one is also an ode to Paris itself.

A somewhat lonely Denver mailwoman (Margo Martindale) makes her first trip to Paris, and recounts how "I fell in love with Paris, and Paris fell in love with me." A mime spreads colour and mischief on his way to love. Two strangers fall in love in a bar. A medic learns that a dying man is in love with her, and seeking her out inadvertantly led to his death at the hands of a racist gang.

A young boy leaves his misogynistic pals behind, to seek love with a young Muslim girl. A pair of British people visit the tomb of Oscar Wilde in Pere-Lachaise, an American actress falls for her drug dealer, and a young nanny's dismal living conditions are a stark contrast to that of the people she works for. All these -- and more -- are intertwined gently in the finale.

But two stand out especially. Tom Tykwer's includes a young blind man (Melchior Beslon) receiving a call from his American actress girlfriend (Natalie Portman). She tells him, "Our spring was wonderful but summer is over now and we missed out on autumn... our love fell asleep, and the snow took it by surprise." In his sorrow, he thinks back to how they met, and how their relationship continued... and gets a surprise.

And Vincenzo Natali turns in a bloody, gothic love story. A young American tourist (Elijah Wood) is walking alone at night, when he steps in a pool of blood. He follows the blood to where a beautiful vampire (Olga Kurylenko) is slurping someone to death -- only to have a sudden attraction bloom up between them. When he has a fall, what will happen?

"Paris Je T'aime" has it all -- comedy, tragedy, romance, racial tension, religion, vampires, sunlit vacations, glamour and cliches. Okay, there's the occasional dud -- "Tuileries," about an American tourist by the Coen Bros., is just lame. But since all the directors are given only about five minutes, most of them are tiny, polished gems without any extraneous material.

Natali's is colourless (except for blood) and eerie, Gurinder Chadha's is shyly sweet and sunny, Richard LaGravenese's is adorable, Craven's is syrupy, and Tykwer's is a delicate web of camera tricks and blurred glimpses. Sylvain Chomet even charms us with mimes zooming through the streets. And each brings another dimension of Paris to life, from lush green parks to bars to the Eiffel Tower itself.

And the acting is just as great -- the great Juliette Binoche, Seydou Boro, Catalina Moreno, Marianne Faithfull, Fanny Ardant, Gérard Depardieu, and the adorable Melchior Beslon. Martindale deserves special praise for her sweetly realistic portrayal of an American tourist, and Portman is brilliantly vibrant as a girl who yells a lot. And Elijah Wood turns out a brilliant performance in total silence, managing to convey fear, mischief, eroticism and love.

"Paris Je T'aime" is a collection of little gems, with the occasional dull pebble thrown in -- brilliant directors, emotionally charged stories, and great acting. Enchanté!
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Eighteen Windows, November 3, 2007
By 
nepos (California) - See all my reviews
To be honest I came away from this movie wondering what it was that I had just seen. "Paris Je t'aime" is a string of eighteen separate vignettes, an average of 5 minutes long, peaking into the "window" of someone's life. The stories take place in different areas of Paris, with some in English and others in French, a veritable montage of acting cameos. The first thing you want to do afterwards is try to remember each story.

The vignettes range from the utterly bizarre to the absolutely heart stirring. My favorite two happen to occur near the beginning and at the end of the film. One of the earliest stories explores the oddly wonderful bloom of attraction between a wisecracking teenage guy and a devout young Muslim girl on a street. The other story at the end sort of sums it up for me. A single woman vacationer from Denver falls in love with Paris. She realizes how alone she is at that moment and as well as in her life, and yet at the same time concludes that it is going to be alright after all.
Her epiphany in the park in Paris will melt your heart.

Rather than tossing around cliches or fishing for trends and themes in this remarkable film, let me end simply by saying that this is not a movie to miss! If the stories present a Paris and it's people as bizarre, sad, unfair, romantic, and yes, sometimes ugly and violent, well.......c'est la vie.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Tantalizing Five (Twenty)-course Meal, June 8, 2007
It's always fun to have a film experience where one can go through new territory that stimulates and surprises. 'Paris Je' T'aime' is such a movie. Made like an exceptional French five-course meal, we are given mini-films that are shot and set in different arrondissements (districts, roughly) in Paris, France. Sporting an all-star cast and directed by a who's who of directors, `Paris...' offers a tasty variety of stories and scenes. While certain courses will always be favorites, all the items are prepared to perfection. The shift in stories are not always connected, but neither is a French meal, which may shift distinctly to a cheese plate. Anyhow, the films are often funny, eye-catching, surprising, witty, and scary--each one a jaunt. Actresses, immigrant Muslims, love stories, tourists, and new-found infatuations are but a few of the ingredients used. I wanted to resist comparisons, but while not interlocking vignettes like 'Nine Lives,' the latter film has two things in common with 'Paris Je' T'aime'. One is that there are several stories; the other is that both movies often zero in on pivotal points in people's lives. In one mini-film a blind man discovers a young woman in distress, only to find she is practicing for a part she wishes to obtain in a Paris drama. We watch as we notice the time-lapsed relationship in all its distinctive detail. To just touch base, another film is a heart-warming and quirky family tale all done in mime. Marcell Marceau popped into my mind throughout their fun rendition.

One can't get enough of Paris, and I felt that 'Paris Je 'T'aime' was more than an adequate sampler of the richness of Parisian life. (With Steve Buscemi, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Gerard Depardieu, Elijah Wood, and director Wes Craven, et al.)
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Je t'aime, June 26, 2007
This review is from: Paris Je T'aime (DVD)
Paris is a city of light, lovers, art and beauty. And "Paris, Je T'aime" explores all the sides of the city in in eighteen brief fiolms, all set in various arrondissements of Paris, and directed by some brilliantly underrated directors. And they seem to be about love -- often it's a person, but each one is also an ode to Paris itself.

A somewhat lonely Denver mailwoman (Margo Martindale) makes her first trip to Paris, and recounts how "I fell in love with Paris, and Paris fell in love with me." A mime spreads colour and mischief on his way to love. Two strangers fall in love in a bar. A medic learns that a dying man is in love with her, and seeking her out inadvertantly led to his death at the hands of a racist gang.

A young boy leaves his misogynistic pals behind, to seek love with a young Muslim girl. A pair of British people visit the tomb of Oscar Wilde in Pere-Lachaise, an American actress falls for her drug dealer, and a young nanny's dismal living conditions are a stark contrast to that of the people she works for. All these -- and more -- are intertwined gently in the finale.

But two stand out especially. Tom Tykwer's includes a young blind man (Melchior Beslon) receiving a call from his American actress girlfriend (Natalie Portman). She tells him, "Our spring was wonderful but summer is over now and we missed out on autumn... our love fell asleep, and the snow took it by surprise." In his sorrow, he thinks back to how they met, and how their relationship continued... and gets a surprise.

And Vincenzo Natali turns in a bloody, gothic love story. A young American tourist (Elijah Wood) is walking alone at night, when he steps in a pool of blood. He follows the blood to where a beautiful vampire (Olga Kurylenko) is slurping someone to death -- only to have a sudden attraction bloom up between them. When he has a fall, what will happen?

"Paris Je T'aime" has it all -- comedy, tragedy, romance, racial tension, religion, vampires, sunlit vacations, glamour and cliches. Okay, there's the occasional dud -- "Tuileries," about an American tourist by the Coen Bros., is just lame. But since all the directors are given only about five minutes, most of them are tiny, polished gems without any extraneous material.

Natali's is colourless (except for blood) and eerie, Gurinder Chadha's is shyly sweet and sunny, Richard LaGravenese's is adorable, Craven's is syrupy, and Tykwer's is a delicate web of camera tricks and blurred glimpses. Sylvain Chomet even charms us with mimes zooming through the streets. And each brings another dimension of Paris to life, from lush green parks to bars to the Eiffel Tower itself.

And the acting is just as great -- the great Juliette Binoche, Seydou Boro, Catalina Moreno, Marianne Faithfull, Fanny Ardant, Gérard Depardieu, and the adorable Melchior Beslon. Martindale deserves special praise for her sweetly realistic portrayal of an American tourist, and Portman is brilliantly vibrant as a girl who yells a lot. And Elijah Wood turns out a brilliant performance in total silence, managing to convey fear, mischief, eroticism and love.

"Paris Je T'aime" is a collection of little gems, with the occasional dull pebble thrown in -- brilliant directors, emotionally charged stories, and great acting. Enchanté!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hit and miss, but the hits are worth it!, May 1, 2009
This review is from: Paris, je t'aime [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
A collection of 18 shorts, all based in Paris and loosely based around the various stages of relationships - starting, flourishing, crumbling. Some hit home more than others, and I think that will be different for everyone. But that's okay - if you don't like one segment, it'll be over in 5 minutes, and you can move on to the next! The obvious correlation is a book of short stories, but it actually reminded me more of walking through a museum with cityscapes on the wall, and your mind imagines what the backstory is on each set of characters and locations. This is like having a mini-glimpse into each painting. One thing I did notice is that love stories are often tragic - there are very few laughs in this movie (although the Coen Brothers segment with Steve Buscemi is freakin' hilarious!). I'm not going to review all the segments, but I will say that my favorite one is also one of the simplest, where a young mother leaves her baby at a nursery, then travels by bus and train across the city, just to act as nanny for someone else's baby. Simple, yet incredibly moving, and says more in three minutes than most movies say in two hours
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36 of 46 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Ruined Blu-Ray Version, January 7, 2009
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This review is from: Paris, je t'aime [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
This is THE WORST Blu-Ray transfer I have seen yet, merely because there are only Subtitles for The Hard Of Hearing, which destroy the film.

The most glaring offense is the mime scene, which has subtitles!

Simply beautiful movie - simply ruined.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The one about the different kind of "love", September 3, 2008
In 2001, I enjoyed an HK film titled "Heroes in Love" which covered the various different forms of "love", four different stories and different directors. Enjoyed the movie very much and years later, when I heard of a film that would feature over a dozen shorts by different directors and talent form all over the world which all take place in the City of Love... Paris, France. I was sold.

In Paris Je T'Aime (Paris, I love You), there are 18 different shorts directed by famous directors worldwide and featuring major talent as well from different parts of the world.

Similar to "Heroes in Love", a different take on "love" with each short but if there was one thing that is consistent with each short is that every location is just beautiful and shows off the beauty of Paris.

For Gurinder Chadha's ("Bend it Like Beckham") titled "Quais De Seine" features a group of three guys sitting around and two of them hollering at the women passing by, while one just watches the woman sitting next to them. Sitting next to them is a young muslim woman who just can't believe what the guys are saying and when she walks off, trips...and the young man helps her up. This segment just shows the two different cultures but yet despite the difference, the young man is fasicinated by her.

For Joe and Ethan Coen ("The Big Lebowski", "O Brother Where Art Thou?") and their short "Tuileries", Sam Buscemi is a tourist and catches the eye of a couple who are making out. Of course, the guy doesn't appreciate it and thus a confrontation begins.

For Olivier Assayas's "Quartier des Enfants Rouges", Maggie Gyllenhaal is an actress who has a passion for narcotics and thus an interesting short to watch her drugged out.

For Australian filmmaker Christopher Doyle, who we know for his work in a variety of camera work for Asian films "Porte de Choisy" features Asian women in France and a sort of nod to the "Chung King Express" days, a classic Faye Wong hit is played during his short.

As for my favorites, Spanish writer-director Isabel Coixet's "Bastille" is a short about a man who is planning to confess to his wife that he wants to leave her. But before he tells her, she drops the news that she has a terminal illness and is dying. And decides to be with her for the remainder of her life and rediscovers he loves her until its too late.

In "Place de Fetes", German writer-director Oliver Schmitz directs a tragic tale of a man who works at a parking garage and falls for a woman he meets. He very much wants to meet her again but when they do, it's not in the best circumstances.

For "Faubourg Saint-Denis", German writer-director Tom Tykwer has an interesting short which features an actress played by Natalie Portman and a young blind man (Melchior Besion). The young man thinks his girlfriend has broken up with him and reminisces of his times with her. This camera and editing/post-production work for this alone was impressive.

"Plae de Victories" by Japanese writer-director Nobuhiro Suwa's short is a mother (played by Juliette Binoche) who mourns her son who has died and just wants to see and hold him one more time. It's a touching short.

There are a few segments that were ok and others that were freaky such as a vampire tale starring Elijah Wood but all in all, I really enjoyed this film.

For one, to have 22 directors come together for 18 shorts about love in Paris and for them to do it in their own style, and some who were able to work with the talent that they really wanted was just very cool. Location scouting for this film was just done well. Every outdoor scene, restaurant scene...everything was well selected and overall, I enjoyed the film.

Now with that being said, both these films are not for everyone. There are those who will watch it and just think both are a waste of their time. While there will be those who watch it and just see the beauty of these two films.

There are different kinds of love and for the directors to explore those differences, that's what I found so fascinating.
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Paris, je t'aime [Blu-ray]
Paris, je t'aime [Blu-ray] by Bruno Podalydès (Blu-ray - 2008)
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