Customer Reviews


10 Reviews
5 star:
 (5)
4 star:
 (4)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "Bow"dacious Double Feature.
This DVD double feature of Clara Bow at the beginning and during the thick of her career gives us a fascinating glimpse of one of the most popular silent stars. DOWN TO THE SEA IN SHIPS (1922) was shot when Clara was only 16 by D.W. Griffith protege' Elmer Clifton. Her part is only a supporting one but you can clearly see the star potential there. The main focus of this...
Published on April 5, 2002 by Chip Kaufmann

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars She is always terrific. But my favorite still remains 'Wings
She is always terrific. But my favorite still remains 'Wings."
Published 1 month ago by flash287


Most Helpful First | Newest First

19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "Bow"dacious Double Feature., April 5, 2002
By 
Chip Kaufmann (Asheville, NC United States) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Parisian Love / Down to the Sea in Ships (DVD)
This DVD double feature of Clara Bow at the beginning and during the thick of her career gives us a fascinating glimpse of one of the most popular silent stars. DOWN TO THE SEA IN SHIPS (1922) was shot when Clara was only 16 by D.W. Griffith protege' Elmer Clifton. Her part is only a supporting one but you can clearly see the star potential there. The main focus of this film is not the romance between the two leads but rather the detailed scenes of New Bedford whalers plying their trade. This makes the film a fascinating historical document which is not for the squeamish as it contains actual and graphic footage of the killing and dismembering of whales. What you see is MOBY DICK for real. This print taken from the Killiam Collection is in good shape although it seems a little fast at times. It is much better than the old VHS version put out by Critic"s Choice some years back.

PARISIAN LOVE (1925) was made only 3 years later but what a difference in Clara's appearance. Here she is the star and fully displays the vivacious charm and charisma that made her so popular. The story of French Apache lovers and their benefactor is a little hard to follow probably due to some missing footage and features some rather curious interplay between the male leads. The sets of Parisian garrets are marvelous and Lillian Leighton steals the show as a Marie Dressler like matriarch at a swanky party. This DVD copy was taken from the only surviving print which was discovered in 1998 and restored by the UCLA Film and Televison Archive. All in all an interesting combination of 1920's style romance with rugged documentary style footage and the chance to see Clara Bow develop from a Mary Pickford like tomboy into a full fledged star. Yet another fine job from Kino International in their ongoing series of silent film presentations on DVD.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Becoming Clara Bow, June 18, 2008
This review is from: Parisian Love / Down to the Sea in Ships (DVD)
Viewers who seek out this Clara Bow double feature will likely compare it to IT, the 1927 charmer to which all of her films are compared sooner or later, the film that finally captured the most naturally exuberant (and unnaturally wounded) personality in silent film. Bow had made more than 30 films in the five years preceding IT, only a handful of which survive in any condition. Even her minor films, therefore, are impossible to ignore. DOWN TO THE SEA IN SHIPS shows us Bow in 1922, barely 17 years old and fresh as rain. In her small role as a long-haired tomboy, she neither poses nor emotes; she is simply herself at 17. The part offers few hints of the luscious flapper whose unembarrassed sensuality would one day startle even Elinor Glyn and deluge Paramount with nearly fifty thousand fan letters a month. PARISIAN LOVE, released three years after DOWN TO THE SEA, teases us with glimpses of the It Girl-to-be. But they are tantalizing glimpses: the long tresses are gone, replaced by a pushed-up, snip-sprung, crazy-tilt hairdo that eases our entry into the softest, most haunted eyes that ever looked out of a movie screen. The silly plot is forgettable; Bow is not. PARISIAN LOVE should serve as the springboard to a much better Bow film from 1925, THE PLASTIC AGE (available from Image in a twofer with THE SHOW OFF).
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars a minor masterpiece, May 3, 2004
By 
Lisa C. Mckenna (Blue Mountains, Sydney, NSW Australia) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Parisian Love / Down to the Sea in Ships (DVD)
i bought this dvd on a whim not knowing what to expect as neither film is acknowledged as one of the great silent movies'but i was pleasently surprised by both.down to the sea in ships is the best directed of the two and features some wonderful whaling sequences and beautiful shots of new bedford,also it has a wonderful ensemble cast especially margerete courtot as the young woman forced into a loveless marriage.parisian love is also a treat for silent fans as it features the wonderful donald keith at the outset of his distinguished carear.all in all a great double feature dvd
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A god send for any Clara Bow fans, January 29, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Parisian Love / Down to the Sea in Ships (DVD)
Alrighty, let's start with print quality:

'Parisian Love' - 5 of 5, beautifully tinted 35mm transfer, stunning and far better than i expected

'Down to the Sea in Ships' - 4.99 of 5, that being said a great deal of the film was shot using hand held cameras on the high seas whereas 'Parisian Love' was shot on a studio lot (the same one, i might add, that Clara used for her other early films such as 'Free to Love' made the same year, which featured a shot of the same staircase but with Clara preceded by teams of men skipping sled-dog style with a length of toilet paper serving for her reigns, while in the other hand she brandishes a thickly feathered fan, an absolutely fabulous entrance scene). Essentially this is by far the best copy of 'Down to the Sea in Ships' that will probably ever be available, it's worth the purchase.

Story line:

'Parisian Love' - If you even remotely like Clara, you'll love this, she's really quite an amazing actress because when you take her characters for what they originally were and then look at how she played them, it's utterly astounding; in 'Dancing Mothers' she broke the 'selfish, spoiled, little brat who doesn't care about anyone' character trope, in 'Mantrap' she broke the 'any girl with a sexual appetite is a slut' character trope, in 'It' she [astoundingly] broke the 'poor girl after rich boss is a heartless gold digger' character trope (something that even later on haunted the screen in Harlow's 'Red Headed Woman', and in this film she plays what was clearly written as trite, overly dramatic trash meant to be performed in that dreadful tragedienne manner found so frequently in cheap, virtually budget-less flicks we all know and loathe. However, Clara not only revitalizes her own rather cliché role, she resuscitates the whole damn film, she adds her own very distinct comedic touch to scenes written too seriously (one instance being when she is groped while acting as a maid and pulls a fantastic little faux kick when he turns around that had me laughing out loud, another was when she attends the ball with her mother and tries to limit her alcohol intake) the entire film sparkles with these little glints of her originality, but in spite of Clara's really quite astounding performance, the film as a whole is a lost cause when you consider what she was up against; bland direction, boring story, and a little more than average cast (only the Lillian Leighton and Donald Keith really stand out as far as Clara's fellow cast members go) the film was doomed from the get go, but any fan of Clara or hardcore silent junkie will find it more than enjoyable.

'Down to the Sea in Ships' - long but fascinating as well as entertaining. Something of note; the whaling sequences are real, this is the closest we can get to 'Moby-Dick' on celluloid and almost worth the purchase for that interesting little historical feature alone.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A must have for Clara lovers!, January 24, 2014
By 
Robert Badgley (St Thomas,Ontario,Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Parisian Love / Down to the Sea in Ships (DVD)
This is the release of two Clara Bow films,her first,Down to the Sea in Ships(released Mar/23) and Parisian Love(released Aug/25).They are certainly not perfect,but are in remarkably good shape for their age.
Parisian Love stars,among others,Clara Bow,Donald Keith and Lillian Leighton.The story has Clara and her lover(Keith) working in a French cafe and hustling for a living.During a robbery in a home Keith prevents his partner from killing the home owner.When the cops arrive the homeowner befriends Keith and takes him under his wing,becoming his mentor.Clara temporarily becomes a maid in the house to find out exactly what has happened to her man.When he gets better he is introduced to other society women and is backed financially by the homeowner for a new invention of his,which becomes successful.
Clara swears revenge on the homeowner and goes forth with her plan to make him fall in love with her.On their wedding night Clara reveals who she is to him.As she is leaving,her lover has just returned from abroad and she runs into his arms.The homeowner goes on a sailing trip and wires that he will divorce her right away as his wedding gift to her.This of course frees Clara up to marry her lover.
The film is a typical melodrama of the period,one of several she was cranking out on a regular basis under BP Schulberg(making more money for him than she was earning,by far).But the film is not without its merits and is generally well acted by its leads.Clara has some good turns throughout,and is especially good in a comedic sense with an old lady,as they try to pass themselves off as high society folks.This film's restoration by UCLA was funded by the author of Clara Bow's biography Runnin' Wild,David Stenn,who obviously put his money where his mouth is and is to be commended.
Down to the Sea in Ships stars,among others,William Walcott,Marguerite Courtot,Raymond McKee and Clara Bow.It is a tale of whaling and the Quaker whaling community of New Bedford,Mass.A prominent whaling family patriarch has two daughters,one of which is of marrying age and is promised to to a local rival's hand.When an old childhood sweetheart comes home to claim his property they fall in love all over again.But despite her new love's protests,because he has never whaled,he cannot possibly marry her.Clara is her sister and she is fiery and temperamental and in love with a ships hand.The rival who wants Clara's sister's hand makes arrangements to have the sister's childhood friend shanghaied and taken away in a whaling ship.On board he is forced to work for his passage and it inadvertently gives him the necessary experience to ask for her hand in marriage when he gets back.Clara however has stowed away on board and she is eventually caught.She gets into deep trouble and as the ship nears home,is rescued by her sister's suitor.He arrives back in New Bedford on a dark and stormy night just as the marriage ceremony is taking place.He breaks in at the last moment and saves his future bride from marrying the rival,who is taken away.The final scene is Clara's,as she is reunited with her boyfriend from the ship.
Quite the melodramatic piece,it nevertheless shows a realism of whaling and its people that rings quite true.Many scenes on the water show a whaling crew actually pursuing a pod and harpooning one of them.It is reminiscent of cinema in the very early years,when realism was THE draw for people.Clara is seen in good light throughout and she actually scene steals whenever she is seen(foreshadowing her future endeavours-the camera loved her).This print is from the Killiam collection,and like Parisian Love,is tinted.
Both of these films are in relatively good shape but do show their age and have defects typical of films of this age.
All in all a nice pairing of Clara Bow films that her sea of fans(no pun intended)will absolutely want.One has Clara at the start of her career and the other about half way along.Historically significant and a must have.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Clara Bow Gets her Man, August 9, 2013
I love silents, I love their creativity - and Clara Bow was not only beautiful but very talented.

Fun movie to watch with comedic moments and much heart!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent!, August 4, 2013
By 
This was fun fun fun! Clara Bow at her best playing a scruffy ruffian ( I am an APACHE!) who turned the tables on a professor who took in and cared for her lover who was wounded in the professor's bedroom during a burglary!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars parisian love, August 4, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Parisian Love / Down to the Sea in Ships (DVD)
good clara bow film parisian love is very funny with clara as the leader of a band of crooks.her scenes with the older women who is part of gang playing her aunt or grandmother forget which,is hilarious they play well together.the other film down to the sea in ships is also a good film ,but you dont see very much of her .she is so young here just beginning her career, so different later on when she was a sexy jazz baby.but here she play a little tough girl who masquerades as a boy to stow away on a ship,she is so cute.but parisian love is great get this film dvd and compare the two films and see how she looks at the start of her carrer and her leading part in parisian love where she dresses as apache dancer and later on in beautiful dresses.you will like it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars She is always terrific. But my favorite still remains 'Wings, December 25, 2014
She is always terrific. But my favorite still remains 'Wings."
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars I like it, September 8, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Parisian Love / Down to the Sea in Ships (DVD)
Great Music!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Parisian Love / Down to the Sea in Ships
Parisian Love / Down to the Sea in Ships by Louis J. Gasnier (DVD - 2002)
$29.98 $18.59
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.