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  • Park Tool TM-1 Spoke Tension Meter
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Park Tool TM-1 Spoke Tension Meter


List Price: $74.95
Price: $71.96
Sale: $63.96 & FREE Shipping. Details
You Save: $10.99 (15%)
Only 14 left in stock.
Sold by BicycleSourceUS and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
  • Measures the absolute tension of each of the spokes in a wheel
  • The TM-1 works on nearly any bicycle spoke
  • Used for building or truing wheels, diagnosing wheel problems, or assembling new bikes
  • Measures relative tension between all the spokes in a wheel
55 new 2 used from $58.84

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Frequently Bought Together

Park Tool TM-1 Spoke Tension Meter + Park Tool WAG-4 Professional Wheel Alignment Gauge + Park Tool Nipple Driver 15mm / 17mm / 19mm w 3/8" Driver
Price for all three: $125.95

Buy the selected items together


Product Description

The key to wheels that are strong and reliable is having spokes that are properly and uniformly tensioned. The TM-1 Tension Meter accurately and reliably measures the absolute tension of each of the spokes in a wheel, as well as the relative tension between all the spokes in a wheel. Easy to use and priced affordably, the TM-1 works on nearly any bicycle spoke¿no matter what the diameter, material, or shape. Not just for the experienced mechanic, the TM-1 is for anyone building or truing wheels, diagnosing wheel problems, or assembling new bikes. It¿s a tool that belongs on every workbench.

Product Details

  • Product Dimensions: 5.8 x 2 x 8.5 inches ; 3.5 ounces
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Shipping: This item is also available for shipping to select countries outside the U.S.
  • ASIN: B000OZDIGY
  • Item model number: 128972
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (70 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #16,445 in Sports & Outdoors (See Top 100 in Sports & Outdoors)
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Customer Reviews

The key to wheel building is adequate, uniform spoke tension.
Vernon Forbes
So, to me the tool is very helpful as it gives a precise reading that you (or at least I) can't get based on touch.
w de raad
The tool is very easy to use, and like all Park Tools it is well made.
David

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

93 of 100 people found the following review helpful By Nathaniel Allen TOP 500 REVIEWER on January 29, 2011
I guess I'm what you call a "book learned / internet learned" home wheel builder (as opposed to having been mentored in a shop environment), and on my first half-dozen builds over many years, I got along just fine without a tension gauge. The most important factors in building a reliable wheel have proved to be sufficient, even tension. (It took me only one attempt to figure out how horribly unreliable an undertensioned wheel could be!) But... with that number of wheels to my name, I was always curious what tension I was ultimately stopping at. So I've had this meter at my side for maybe about five years now.

If you're the least bit neurotic or OCD, this tension meter will simultaneously be the best and worst friend in your toolkit. It's possible, for instance, to perform your initial lacing to a low tension value, rather than driving the nipples to where the spoke threads just disappear below the nipple. Possible, but a huge time waster.

It's possible to go around and around and around and around again, a quarter turn tighter here, a quarter turn looser there, in an attempt to achieve "perfect" uniform tension as indicated the the Park's scale. Again, a huge time waster.

Here's how I prefer to use the tension meter: leave it in the box initially. Lace the wheel, lightly tension, stress relieve the spokes, build the tension and true with care. All the while, pluck the spokes and listen to the tone. Pull the tension meter out to verify final tension, but then trust your ears while plucking your way around the wheel looking for noticeably high pitched (over tensioned) or low toned spokes.
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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Vernon Forbes on February 1, 2013
I have built wheels for 7 shops in 4 states since 1979. A tensiometer is unnecessary for wheel repair but is invaluable for building any new wheel. I check the tension on every wheel I build. Spoke tension became more important after 1981 when Brandt showed that spokes fail from fatigue instead of exceeding their elastic limit. It still sounds ironic to say but spokes break from inadequate tension causing fatigue failure. Having ADEQUATE, UNIFORM tension is the key to building a wheel. Spoke manufacturers tell you the tension to use in kilograms of force. You need a tensiometer to be able to follow the manufacturer's recommendations.

It is impossible to determine spoke tension by how hard it is to turn the nipples because they press into the rim adding drag when you try to turn it. A spoke tensiometer is the only way to know.

The other problem with building wheels is sudden wheel collapse where the wheel unexpectedly assumes a potato chip shape while you are riding. This is prevented with UNIFORM spoke tension. The spokes should all have the same tension when plucked. You cannot determine the tension a spoke is at from the tone; on spokes with different lengths, the same tension will give different tones.

The key to wheel building is adequate, uniform spoke tension. While you can pluck to determine uniformity with a Fender 351 Classic Celluloid Guitar Picks 12-Pack - Shell - Heavy you need a tensiometer to determine the ADEQUATE level of tension. Some reviewers think a tensiometer is too awkward and unnecessary. IN PRACTICE, YOU DON'T MEASURE THE TENSION ON EVERY SPOKE IN THE WHEEL.
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29 of 31 people found the following review helpful By D. J. Mccartney on May 7, 2009
The TM-1 Spoke Tension Meter works very well. I commute by bike every day to work, and among my three road bikes that I rotate through (set up differently for weather and load), was popping spokes to the tune of about 1 or 2 a month, mostly due to what I perceive to be overtorque on some of the spokes. Now I have torqued my spokes at the lower end of the recommended range and have yet to pop a spoke, and it is reassuring to know that they all are torqued to the same value. It does take a little bit of give and take to get the wheel trued, but with just a little bit of effort you can adjust the tension to the correct range, then make minor adjustments of individual spokes to get the wheel to spin true. You end up with a much more consistent torque range throughout the entire wheel, which eliminates overstress (hot spots) on overtorqued spokes.
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71 of 89 people found the following review helpful By New England Yankee on October 24, 2008
I have to say that when I was being trained in wheel work, tension gauges were frowned upon. Tension is important, but the problem is that it is only one variable among many, and concern was always that mechanics would try to apply it in simplistic fashion. The problem is this - if you know wheels, you don't really need a tension gauge. If you don't, using one isn't going to help out much, and can actually hurt you, especially in wheel repair. Gauges are most useful in building new wheels with pristine components, and when building to a production standard. That's not a very good description of home wheel work and not even for shop work.

The gauge itself is decent. Instead of buying it, however, my advice is to take a wheel building and repair workshop at a good local shop instead.
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