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Parrots of the World: An Identification Guide Hardcover – February 6, 2006


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press; F First Edition edition (February 6, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0691092516
  • ISBN-13: 978-0691092515
  • Product Dimensions: 12.3 x 8.7 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.7 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #835,857 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Once again Joseph Forshaw has raised the bar of avian identification guides. His latest book . . . is a superbly written and illustrated book on all parrot species and subspecies of the world. . . . I cannot recommend this book highly enough and believe it should hold pride of place in any collection of avian volumes.
(Susie Anderson Australian Aviculture)

Joseph Forshaw's name is synonymous with quality parrot books. . . . For the serious parrot enthusiast, this excellent book is a must-have. Without a doubt, Parrots of the World: An Identification Guide, will remain for years to come, the definitive work on the subject of parrot identification.
(Russell Kingston Australian Birdkeeper)

As well as helping identification this terrific book also covers the relationships between parrot families, plus their relationship with humans and subsequent conservation issues affecting the birds today. Any fan of birding in the tropics will want a copy, as will those with an interest from an aviculture perspective.
(The Visitor)

A wonderful addition to any avian library.
(AFA Watchbird)

This is a very valuable reference text.
(Roger Wilkinson Newsletter of the World Parrot Trust)

Altogether it is a fine addition to the literature and one that will please the most discriminate reader.
(Charles E. Keller Indiana Audubon Quarterly)

By far the most comprehensive and illustrative handbook for distinguishing all 350 extant species of psittacines in the world.... An essential tool.
(Auk)

About the Author

Joseph M. Forshaw is one of Australia's foremost ornithologists and is recognized internationally as a leading expert on parrots. He is the author of several books, including "Parrots of the World", with William Cooper; "Australian Parrots"; "The Birds of Paradise and Bower Birds";" Kingfishers and Related Birds"; and "Turacos: A Natural History of the Musophagidae". Frank Knight has been an illustrator for more than twenty-five years, producing illustrations for scientific papers, books, and lectures. His work appears in "A Field Guide to the Birds of Australia"; and in "A Field Guide to the Mammals of Australia".

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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See all 30 customer reviews
Five stars across the board!
Bombina
It's one of those books at parrot lovers must have in a collection of bird reference books.
Bird Person
Also the book tells in detail the color and size of the Parrots.
V. Woollard

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Bruce M. Miller on April 10, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A gorgeous book. More usable than the previous edition: physically smaller (still a coffee-table book, but lighter & smaller - binding should hold up now), much more up to date, no more hunting for pictures. Downsides: text refers to color plates but color plates don't refer back to text, and a short bibliography (<100 cites. It does cite the previous edition and Juniper & Parr, each with over 700 cites, but you'd need those to track references). Compared to Juniper & Parr's Parrots: A Guide to Parrots of the World, it's cheaper, more recent and better for phylogeny; but has less information about each species and doesn't cite references for each species. The larger size allows an elegant layout but makes it a poor field guide.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Duncan Maxwell on March 24, 2011
Format: Paperback
This is certainly the best parrot guide I've ever seen, the result of a great deal of expertise and talent. The illustrations are clear, and for many species the bird is shown from the top and bottom to aid identification. Where birds vary in appearance by sex this is shown, and in most cases it seems the different subspecies are shown as well. This is particularly pleasing in the case of the Rainbow Lorikeet, the multiple highly variable subspecies of which are treated over six pages (including three plates). Similar looking species are lumped together and the illustration quality makes it clear what to look for to tell them apart. The maps are generallly good with each map using separate colours to mark the separate ranges of the subspecies.

There are, unfortunately, flaws. The common names used follow earlier editions, with a seeming preference for avicultural names over those used by birdwatchers and the various ornithological organisations. While this is the perogative of the writers, it would have been helpful to include commonly used alternatives either in the text or in the index. Additionally the taxonomy used seems somewhat out of date for a book just published. It's been ten years since Boon (2001) showed that the Norfolk and New Caledonian Parakeets were not only distinct from the Red-fronted Parakeet (actually the Red-crowned Parakeet, but never mind) but actually basal to the entire genus, yet they are still lumped in that species in this new edition. Similarly the Chatham Parakeet should be treated as very distinct from the Yellow-crowned Parakeet, but isn't. In some instances these splits are alluded to in the text (as they are for the Chathams Parakeet), but this isn't consistently done (for example in the case of teh Ouvea Parakeet from the Horned Parakeet).
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful By V. Woollard on January 4, 2007
Format: Hardcover
The Parrots of the World: An Identification Guide by Joseph M. Forshaw is an excellant book that shows beautiful color pictures of the Parrots, tells where the Parrots are from with a colored map of the area they are originally from in the wild. Also the book tells in detail the color and size of the Parrots. I would highly recommend it for anyone interested in recognizing the different Parrots.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Bird Lover on August 30, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book was a really great find. In the introduction, you learn tons about parrots, habitats, diet, etc. The color plates are beautifully illustrated and complete with information and range maps. The information and paintings are crisp and precise; very easy to understand. Parrots of the World isn't too big, so you can take it anywhere, and read it everywhere without it being a pain. It covers every single parrot in the world, even extinct ones!I loved this book, and any bird lover will, too.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By nature boy on March 25, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
In late February 2011, I was working away from home in Southern California and I kept seeing parrots. I opted for the convenience of the Kindle edition. It is handy carrying around books in your pocket but I wish that the editors would have taken a wee bit more care in making certain the plates and the maps were crisp. I mean the names can be read but by no means crisp. And plumage details like eyering color are difficult to discern. Likewise, details on the maps are completely obscured and difficult to read. Buyer beware. I give it a hesitant thumbs up but only because of the convenience.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By David A. Rintoul on July 11, 2013
Format: Paperback
Noted Australian ornithologist Forshaw has designed this new work to be more useful in the field. It features paintings and text allowing identification of 356 species. Subspecies are also illustrated and discussed, adding immensely to the value of the book. The text is terse but includes details about habitat, behavior, and distinctive plumage characteristics to help avoid confusion with similar species in the same geographic area. The maps are detailed, and the quality of the illustrations is excellent. A casualty of the downsizing from the earlier work, however, is the loss of the bibliography. In general, this would be a good guide for travelers and birders. Unlike the previous volume, however, it is probably not the best choice for the aviculturist, since it lacks many varieties that have been generated in captivity. It is the best book on the market for those who want to view and identify parrots in the wild; there are probably other more suitable books on parrots in captivity. But it is a beautiful volume about some of the most striking birds in the world, and well worth the purchase price for anyone interested in parrots. (This is excerpted from my review in Choice, the review journal of the American Library Association.)
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