Buy New
$10.75
Qty:1
  • List Price: $12.00
  • Save: $1.25 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Part Way to Utah : the Forgotten Mormons Paperback – April 10, 1997


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$10.75
$10.75 $6.57
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 193 pages
  • Publisher: Refiner's Fire Ministries (April 10, 1997)
  • ISBN-10: 0970716095
  • ISBN-13: 978-0970716095
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 8.2 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,146,288 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Paul's study of the priesthood makes Part Way to Utah a ‘must read’ for anyone dealing with Latter Day Saints.” -- Carol Eskridge, Christian Liberty Outreach, Independence, Missouri.

“The author meticulously interprets Biblical truth…and shows the disparity of this truth in Mormon beliefs.” -- Rev. Erwin D. Ingebretson, Religion Analysis Service, The Discerner, Jan–Mar, 1998.

“The research and thorough approach was unlike other books…I could not discount the issues it brought up.” -- Todd Talcott, Lone Jack, Missouri.

About the Author

Paul Trask was a member of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (RLDS) for nineteen years, and held RLDS priesthood for fifteen years. He served as congregational pastor in San Francisco, California and Independence, Missouri, and as Counselor to the San Francisco Bay Stake Bishop.

After extensive study and prayer the Trask family left the RLDS church in 1989. In 1993, Paul earned a Master of Divinity degree from Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California.

Paul and wife, Leslie, whose family has been in the Latter Day Saint movement for six generations, have founded Refiner's Fire Ministries to provide resources and support for current and former members of the RLDS church, and to equip the Christian community.


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

2.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
2
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 17, 2002
Format: Paperback
Paul Trask beautifully fills the void of Christian apologetics materials available on the Reorganized Latter Day Saints. He covers RLDS history, helps you understand their thinking, and helps you focus on beliefs relevant to RLDS, rather than on LDS beliefs. (Many Christians may not even realize the Reorganized church, also called "Community of Christ," exists.)
Trask has excellent analyses of RLDS scriptures, RLDS Zionism, and the RLDS priesthoods from the Christian perspective. He gives helpful, realistic guidance in winning RLDS members to Christ. This is an indispensable aid to Christian witnessing in this specialized area!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Crazy Horse on December 5, 2008
Format: Paperback
Paul Trask, the author of Part Way to Utah, is a former member of what is currently known as the Community of Christ. Trask depicts himself as one of the many casualties among conservative members of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints generated by a gradual takeover, beginning in the late 1960s, by those indoctrinated in liberal Protestant seminaries.

An escalating and ever increasingly radical series of changes were forced upon those previously situated in the Reorganization. Many conservative RLDS ended up joining one of the splinter groups that have broken away from the Reorganized Church. Unlike these, Trash gravitated into a form of fundamentalist Baptist religiosity.

This explains the glowing endorsement of Trask's essay by Phil Roberts, currently the president of the Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. Roberts was the person primarily responsible for the anti-Mormon propaganda circulated before and during the 9-11 June 1998 annual convention in Salt Lake City of the Southern Baptist Convention. Trask has become a rather typical countercult anti-Mormon.

The primary difference between this book and the usual countercult literature on Mormon things is that Part Way to Utah attempts to direct the attack against the Community of Christ.

One useful feature of this volume is the collection of statements by those now disaffected from the Reorganization whose transition into Protestantism was clearly facilitated by their already having imbibed much of the style and some of the content found in nineteenth-century Protestant fundamentalism.

They have now shifted fully in that direction.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Conny Svensson on November 5, 2006
Format: Paperback
It is tragic that there are so few scholarly books about the Community of Christ (CoCh). This is the second book I have found that is wholly devoted to CoCh, (the other one being Carol Hansen). The authors of both books know each other and have helped each other in writing these books, Carol's came after this one.

The book reflects the typical converted people's strategies in denouncing the former faith from a new acquired "truth" based on another equally ineffable system of faith. However, even these books have some objective facts - such as the background of CoCh or their teachings. At the same thing, these parts take always some ten percent of total volume, cause the book is written to counter-argue.

So, based on the research on Latter-day Saints (Utah) during the period of 1940s-1970s the typical anti-LDS strategy is used. For those of you who are not acquainted with this tradition I'll clarify it shortly: Joseph Smith Jr (1805-1844) came to establish a new Christian tradition based on his revelations. When killed, different denominations (100 or so) flourished in his wake, one being the very large and known LDS in Salt Lake (10 millions or so adherents) and the other one, CoCh (200 000 or so adherents). Besides theological differences, the shared history of both, grounded in the revelations of Joseph, makes it easier for Trask to use anti-LDS rhetoric. The tragedy is cemented when the anti-LDS rhetoric still clings 1940s-1970s and hasn't evolved since then. Another tragedy is that CoCh is more liberal in its attitude, which make Trask's task difficult, but he has chosen to argue against the "traditional" CoCh.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search