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Passages: Predictable Crises of Adult Life Paperback – Unabridged, July 1, 1984


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 564 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam; 5th edition (July 1, 1984)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553271067
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553271065
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 4.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #368,496 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

  Caring for a loved one with a chronicle illness--a parent, partner, sibling or child -- is a role no one aspires to but many of us will take on.
  In her superb new book, "Passages in Caregiving", Gail Sheehy writes that someone is serving as an unpaid family caregiver in almost one-third of American households. It's a job that last an average of five years..
  by Anne Colby, LA Times, May 22, 2010
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Publisher

At last, this is your story. You'll recognize yourself, your friends, and your loves. You'll see how to use each life crisis as an opportunity for creative change -- to grow to your full potential. Gail Sheehy's brilliant road map of adult life shows the inevitable personality and sexual changes we go through in our 20s, 30s, 40s, and beyond. The Trying 20s -- The safety of home left behind, we begin trying on life's uniforms and possible partners in search of the perfect fit. The Catch 30s -- illusions shaken, it's time to make, break, or deepen life commitments. The Forlorn 40s -- Dangerous years when the dreams of youth demand reassessment, men and women switch characteristics, sexual panic is common, but the greatest opportunity for self-discovery awaits. The Refreshed (or Resigned) 50s -- Best of life for those who let go old roles and find a renewal of purpose.

More About the Author


Gail Sheehy is the world-renowned author of seventeen books, most notably the New York Times best-seller Passages, named one of the ten most influential books by the Library of Congress and which has been translated into twenty-eight languages.

Her latest book, DARING: My Passages, is a memoir available now for preorder; September 2014 from HarperCollins.

As a literary journalist, Sheehy was one of the original contributors to New York magazine. A contributing editor to Vanity Fair since 1984, she won the Washington Journalism Review Award for Best Magazine Writer in America for her in-depth character portraits of national and international leaders.

Sheehy is a seven-time recipient of the New York Newswomen's Club Front Page Award for distinguished journalism. Among her other bestsellers are Sex and the Seasoned Woman; Hillary's Choice; New Passages; Understanding Men's Passages; and Passages in Caregiving.

A popular lecturer, she is represented by American Program Bureau (617-614-1607).

She currently resides in New York City.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 13, 1999
Format: Paperback
I first read this book at the ancient age of 27, and it then had little relevency to my budding young life, my passages had been so few...now, at the age of 48, it all looks like a roadmap of my life, much of what Sheehy wrote now makes sense, now comes into focus, now jumps off the page at me...my suggestion is that the book needs to be updated, rewritten from the perspective of one who has actually made the "Passages"...still, the book is remarkable...either Sheehy is the most intuitive person who ever lived, or did research unknown at the time to man/woman...all in all, I find it a book best read once you've been there and done that...otherwise, it means little...unfortunately, I think, it is a work only appreciated in your own personal rearview mirror...reading it as a young man or woman might unduly influence how one's life plays out...but I have every intention of reading it again, and perhaps again...
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Jose Solera on August 14, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
After trying to figure out why the disenchantment with work as I hit 40, this book has explained it! Although some of the data used is out of date, the findings are still very valid.
I recommend it to those trying to figure out how to navigate through life.
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27 of 31 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 10, 1999
Format: Paperback
At first I thought this book might not be relevant to me, some 20 years after it was written in a different country. Whilst some of the stereotypical behaviours and social "norms" are different, it is easy to see the translation of the insights to today and in a different country. And while the USA of the 70s is gone this book provided me with a better understanding of some of the (largely unconscious) behaviour of friends, parents and siblings, behaviours which I had not identified or simply taken for granted are now a little easier to fathom. As I read about each life stage I could identify it with those I know and this enabled me to forgive, empathise with and accept a lot which had previously left me hurt and baffled.
Although fairly young (35) I can already see some of the patterns at play which Gail describes. I don't care if it's not original work or if the lifetstyles are different and the social pressures altered, this book is still very applicable to those who can objectively view themselves and those around them.
This book looks at middle and upper middle class university graduates (called "college" graduates in the US) with primarily professional vocations in accounting, law, medicine etc (stangely little mention of engineers!). Also, I suspect the people are largely private school educated. Whilst people in other circustances might be under different pressures, I have seen similar crises and cycles in a wide range of people. A perceptive reader would learn from this book, nomatter their circumstances.
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79 of 105 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 20, 2004
Format: Paperback
you're in your mid-50s, White, wealthy, live in posh suburbs on the coast, spent the last 30 years climbing (steadily) up the corporate ladder to VP status or are counting your millions as a sucessfull entrepreneur. If not (blue collar, high school grad, struggle to pay the bills every month, can barely afford health insurance), this tome will remind you of NOTHING in your life...because your 20s, 30s, 40s, and 50s have been one blur of dead-end jobs, loss of purchasing power, long hours, low pay, etc.
As authors far more talented and original than Sheehy observed 200 years ago, leisure is a function of wealth and privelege, and only the leisure class has the time or money to spend "contemplating" their lives on a by-the-minute basis..."passages" between the wunderkind preppie years to the grasping yuppie to the ostentatious wealthy world of illegal domestics, fine wine, expensive SUVs, private schools, and a flow of other lifestyle perks.
BTW, this is hardly the rant of a repressed Marxist. MBA, college professor, US military officer, etc. I found Sheehy's work irritating over 20 years ago, and the previous 20 years of listening to whining yuppies echo her Deep Philosophy on Life has done little to change my opinion.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 11, 1998
Format: Paperback
The first time I read Gail Sheehy's book, _Passages_, was back in the 70's when the book first came out. In fact, I think everyone in one of my graduate school psychology classes had read or was reading it before enrolling for our developmental psychology class! It turned out that everyone of us had enrolled in that particular class because of what we had read in _Passages_ and were trying to apply it to our own adult life crises. The book was quite revealing about adult life and what each of us might expect at the turning points of our lives. Now, I am re-reading _Passages_ and I still find the book to be insightful; however from a perspective of twenty-some years down the road, I think that perhaps the book more appropriately describes the "passages" in adult life for a particular generation. I am looking forward to reading Sheehy's sequel, _New Passages_.
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17 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Cindy Griffin on April 24, 2000
Format: Paperback
My Father gave me the book Passages to read when I was a teenager. I could not put the book down and have referenced it multiple times since then. I am now planning on including it as one of my daughter's highschool graduation presents. It touches your mind, your heart and your soul.
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