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Passenger Hardcover


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Frequently Bought Together

Passenger + The Marbury Lens + Stick
Price for all three: $40.12

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  • The Marbury Lens $13.35
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 480 pages
  • Publisher: Feiwel & Friends (October 2, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 125000487X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1250004871
  • Product Dimensions: 2.2 x 3.3 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #313,498 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Gr 9 Up-Readers will need to be familiar with The Marbury Lens (Feiwel & Friends, 2010) to fully appreciate Passenger. When Jack and his friend Connor leave to spend their junior year at a boarding school in England, they decide to cleave the Marbury lens in two, leaving one half with their younger friends Ben and Griffin in California. They meant to make things right, not to destroy them. Alas, by shattering the lens, they find that their out-of-control visits to Marbury become blacker, bleaker, and more foul than ever before. The "not-world" of Marbury is clearly related to their everyday hometown, populated by some of the same people, but suffering the aftermath of war and plague. People can be dead in one reality, but alive in another. Friends can become enemies. Violence is the normal state, and skulls and severed body parts serve as decorations and jewelry. Jack narrates, but he often refers to himself in the third person, as if viewing events as an outsider. He likens Marbury to nesting dolls-worlds within worlds-and all of the Marbury levels are gruesome and horrifying. Every so often, Jack surfaces in the "real" world, just long enough to vomit and realize that he needs to go back to Marbury, to try to rescue Ben and Griffin, and find Connor, who is sometimes with the enemy forces, and other times a friend. This book is for readers strong of stomach, willing to walk with Jack and Connor to the edge of sanity. Their willingness to suffer for each other, and to try to see to the safe return of Ben and Griffin, are small rays of hope in a book otherwise as dark as they come.-Maggie Knapp, Trinity Valley School, Fort Worth, TXα(c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

From Booklist

*Starred Review* Things got mighty grim for Jack in The Marbury Lens (2010), but it seems that being abducted by a sexual predator and then sucked through a set of glasses, in and out of the ruined wasteland of Marbury, was just the first circle of hell. Jack decides, along with friends Conner, Ben, and Griffin, to destroy the glasses, but smashing the lens only results in fracturing the boundaries between worlds and shuttling Jack and crew through progressively more tortured realities, where savage creatures hunt down boys and disfigured corpses outpopulate the living. The first book’s emotionally eviscerating gut-punch came mostly from Jack’s tormented wavering between the real world and Marbury. This follow-up becomes almost completely unmoored from reality’s anchor, an experimentally crazy tour through a junk-sick fever dream fueled by Jack’s anguish, guilt, anger, grief, and self-loathing. The drawn-out, hellish trip is told in frantic, convulsive prose that festers around the nauseating horrors Jack witnesses in Marbury and the traumatic psychological wounds he can’t stop prying open. Where it all leads to both surprises and recalibrates what the whole trip has been about. Or not. Smith is hardly afraid to leave things open-ended, unspoken, and all the more memorable for it. With this uncompromising two-book saga, Smith has securely carved out his spot on the darkest fringes of YA lit. Grades 10-12. --Ian Chipman

More About the Author

Andrew Smith knew ever since his days as editor of his high school newspaper that he wanted to be a writer. After graduating college, he experimented with journalistic careers - writing for newspapers and radio stations - but found it wasn't the kind of writing he'd dreamed about doing.

Born with an impulse to travel, Smith, the son of an immigrant, bounced around the world and from job to job, working at various times in a metals mill, as a longshoreman unloading bananas from Central America and imported autos from Japan, in bars and liquor stores, in security, and as a musician, before settling down permanently in Southern California. Here, he got his first "real job," as a teacher in an alternative educational program for At-Risk teens, married, and moved to a rural mountain location. Throughout his life, Smith continued to write, but never considered seeking publication until challenged into it by lifelong friend, author Kelly Milner Halls.

In 2008, Smith published his first novel, Ghost Medicine, an ALA/YALSA "Best Books for Young Adults." This was followed in 2009 with In the Path of Falling Objects, also a BBYA recipient. The Marbury Lens is Smith's third novel, and will be followed in 2011 by Stick.

Smith prefers the seclusion of his rural setting, where he lives with his wife, 16-year-old son, 13-year-old daughter, two horses, three dogs, three cats, and one irritable lizard named Leo.

Customer Reviews

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The first book had some dark tones, but this book brings it to a whole other level.
Book Sake
The opening to The Marbury Lens is exceptional--one of the best I've read, and Passenger's closing poignantly lives up to that same standard.
Daniel Hendrix
This is one of the few audio books that makes you feel strange while you listen and go about your normal business.
Samantha Boyette

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Book Sake VINE VOICE on October 14, 2012
Format: Hardcover
The first book, The Marbury Lens, was possibly one of my favorite books of all time. This book is great and I loved it, but I got a completely different feel from this book. The first book had some dark tones, but this book brings it to a whole other level. The environment and characters are brutal and violent. It really brings you down some times. The book is about how the world is just screwing with him nonstop. It really does make you feel bad for him. And the thought of dead children and people committing suicide from the brutality of the world is definitely hard to swallow. But all of this is written in a way that makes you want to read it to the end and hope that everything turns out ok. Great book and highly recommend it.

ARC reviewed by Kole for Book Sake.
Book Received: For free from publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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By Samantha Boyette on August 31, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Sequel to the Marbury Lens and man does it keep the crazy flowing. I was so pumped when I found out that the story wasn't over, but now I'm sad because I don't think there is a third book. There really doesn't need to be a third one except for the one small fact that we STILL HAVE NO IDEA WHAT MARBURY IS!?!?

Ugh, but that's what makes reading these books so good. You are just as lost as Jack. Situations are life and death and Andrew Smith has no problem killing off his characters so you have to be ready for anything. Reading both of these books is quite a rush. I almost wish I had read them back to back but it was nice to get a breather in between.

Most of the bad reviews revolve around the intense violence and gore of the book, but that's what makes it feel real. I felt every punch in the gut and wrinkled my nose at every smell in the air because Smith writes in a way that brings it to life. Especially in the audio book. This is one of the few audio books that makes you feel strange while you listen and go about your normal business. I felt like I was half in another world that the people around me had no idea about. Which made me even more into Jack and his story.

Okay, I'm just rambling now,perhaps even gushing. Overall just a great great great book and I loved it and this is going on the short list of books I will read again.
--Reviewed by Samantha Boyette, author of Morning Rising, Darkness of Morning, and Voodoo--
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By S.M. Muse on April 12, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I love Andrew Smith's writing, and I can't wait till the next book in this series is released... I would definitely recommend this series as the worlds are intriguing, the characters riveting. Like the other reviewers, I could not put this book down until I was finished.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Trace on March 29, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a great book. The first one left off leaving me going "wtf andrew?" But this tied it all up.
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