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Passport Not Required: U.S. Volunteers in the Royal Navy, 1939-1941 Hardcover


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Naval Institute Press; Second Edition edition (October 15, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1591142245
  • ISBN-13: 978-1591142249
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.9 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #483,665 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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About the Author

Eric Dietrich-Berryman, a native of Germany, is a thirty-year veteran of the U.S. Naval Reserve. He lives in Cape Henry, VA.

Charlotte Hammond, a resident of Worthing, England, is a solicitor with a British law firm.

Ronald E. White served in the Royal Navy in World War II. He died in 2009.

More About the Author

Eric Dietrich-Berryman was born in Berlin, Germany and grew up in Aberdare, Wales and Gloucester, England. He came to the United States at the age of seventeen as an unaccompanied immigrant on the German quota for 1957. He was educated at Upfield Preparatory School, Stroud, England; Hofstra University, New York (BA, 1966); and the University of New Mexico (MA, 1968; PhD, 1971). He served in the U.S. Army as a helicopter door gunner in the Vietnam War and retired from the U.S. Navy in 1994 as a commander. He retired a second time in 2003 from what is now the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency. Eric and his wife Bobbie live in Virginia Beach, Virginia at the western foot of Cape Henry.

Charlotte Hammond was born in Brighton, England. She spent her early years in Hove in a flat that overlooked HMS King Alfred. Educated at Chatsmore Catholic High School and Worthing Sixth Form College, she was Head Girl of her secondary school. She completed her professional studies at the College of Law, Guildford, and is an associate solicitor, Commercial Litigation Department, in the Sea Lane Chambers of Bennett Griffin, Solicitors. Her paternal grandfather served in the plans section of the U.S. Navy's Grosvenor Square facility cited in this book, and afloat on the destroyer USS Barton and the cruiser USS Columbus. She was formerly a legal advisor in Court Service where she met Police Constable Ronald White. Charlotte died of cancer on July 31, 2012. She leaves a husband, Matthew Wrighton, daughter Sophie and son Joe.

Ronald E. White, known to everyone as Chalky, was born in 1937 and educated at Cobham in Surrey. He entered the Royal Navy at the age of fifteen as a Boy Seaman and continued his education and naval training at HMS St Vincent, Gosport. Chalky served on board ships all over the world, including the destroyer HMS Barrosa, the frigate HMS Troubridge, and the aircraft carrier HMS Victorious. He joined Sussex Police in 1962 and served in various postings including Steyning, Shoreham-by-Sea, Arundel, Eridge, where he was the village police officer, and finally at Littlehampton, all within the County of Sussex. Chalky admired and respected the late Bernard 16th Duke of Norfolk and had a great affection for him. His Grace reciprocated in kind and when he died in 1975, having planned his own funeral, Chalky was asked to lead the funeral procession. In 1982 he was invited to a reception in St. James' Palace where the Marquess of Abergavenny introduced him personally to Her Majesty the Queen as "This is Chalky, my policeman!" He retired as a police constable in 1992 with more than thirty years' service and six commendations and lived in Goring-by-Sea. His hobbies included naval history research, long-distance country walking, and gardening. Chalky White died of mesothelioma in the spring of 2009.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Robert A. Lynn on August 29, 2011
Format: Hardcover
PASSPORT NOT REQUIRED: U.S. VOLUNTEERS IN THE ROYAL NAVY, 1939-1941
ERIC DIETRICH-BERRYMAN, CHARLOTTE HAMMOND, AND R.E. WHITE
NAVAL INSTITUTE PRESS, 2010
HARDCOVER, $27.95, 208 PAGES, PHOTOGRAPHS, INDEX

In another time and place, they might have been called mercenaries for they fought for profit under a foreign flag in a cause not their own. But the word "mercenary" hardly befits a single one of the 22 U.S. citizens who ventured to England to enlist in the Royal Navy during the darkest hours of World War II. They fought with distinction and bravery in the air with the Fleet Air Arm and aboard every type of Royal Navy warship from battle cruisers to Fairmile motor launches. And not a few of them died in battle under their adopted flag. But the truth is that these most unusual men didn't have to give up their American citizenship, nor taken any oath to "save the King" for the British were so in need of their services that they received special dispensation when they accepted their commissions in the Royal Navy.

This is a story of a breed of men that essentially don't exist today. Patricians all, to a man they were of the privileged class counting on schools like Yale, Dartmouth, and Harvard for their educational pedigree and their parents' estates for subsistence. A few were medical doctors, attorneys, or successful bankers. Several were professional flyers and virtually all were seasoned yachtmen with wide experience under sail or steam. Many were married. No one really knew why they made their way to England to enlist in the Royal Navy. Their motives were as varied as their backgrounds. A few frankly wanted out of bad domestic situations and others had a drinking problem. Some were violently anti-Nazi.
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