Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available

To view this video download Flash Player

 
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Tell the Publisher!
I'd like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Old Patchwork Quilts and the Women Who Made Them. [Paperback]

Ruth E. Finley
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)


Available from these sellers.


Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover --  
Paperback --  
Paperback, June 1971 --  
Unknown Binding --  

Book Description

June 1971 0823150259 978-0823150250
First published in 1929, this record of the most picturesque of all American folk arts is an enduring contribution to the study of women's history. The 200 photographs and diagrams of the original book are supplemented in this third edition by eight pages of color plates and an introduction by Barbara Brackman.
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Charles T Branford (June 1971)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0823150259
  • ISBN-13: 978-0823150250
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.4 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,467,109 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
(6)
4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
74 of 74 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Riveting History of Quiltmaking in America April 29, 2000
Format:Paperback
I bought this book about 20 years ago. It was first published in 1929, but it reads as if it were written at the height of the feminist movement in the 70s! The author had a great sense of humor and a marvelous appreciation of how women needed, and found in quilting, an artistic/creative outlet, at a time when just about everything else in their world was controlled or created by men.
She traces the development of techniques and designs, from simple to complex, interweaving her discussion with descriptions of the social and environmental circumstances that influenced design and especially the naming of designs. For example, "It was impossible for the women who every morning viewed nature's most glorious spectacle not to create a 'Rising Sun' quilt pattern. How they loved the sunrise is best proved by the remarkable beauty of the pattern it inspired...It is a triumph of design and is so difficult of execution that only the most expert quilt-makers attempted it. A 'Rising Sun' was post-graduate work, and consequently is one of the rarest and most valuable of quilts."
She traces how pattern names often changed as the quilters' circumstances changed. For example, a pattern that has been known as the "Bear's Paw" (and sometimes as "Hand of Friendship") since the early 1800s in PA and Ohio was called "Duck's-foot-in-the-mud" in Long Island!
Describing Pennsylvania Dutch quilts within the context of the drabness of the Pennsylvania Dutch woman's existence she says, "...it may have been some unconsciously craved compensation for the drab monotony of their days that caused the women of these households to evolve quilt patterns so intricate.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Riveting History of Quiltmaking in America April 29, 2000
Format:Paperback
I bought this book about 20 years ago. It was first published in 1929, but it reads as if it were written at the height of the feminist movement in the 70s! The author had a great sense of humor and a marvelous appreciation of how women needed, and found in quilting, an artistic/creative outlet, at a time when just about everything else in their world was controlled or created by men.
She traces the development of techniques and designs, from simple to complex, interweaving her discussion with descriptions of the social and environmental circumstances that influenced design and especially the naming of designs. For example, "It was impossible for the women who every morning viewed nature's most glorious spectacle not to create a 'Rising Sun' quilt pattern. How they loved the sunrise is best proved by the remarkable beauty of the pattern it inspired...It is a triumph of design and is so difficult of execution that only the most expert quilt-makers attempted it. A 'Rising Sun' was post-graduate work, and consequently is one of the rarest and most valuable of quilts."
Describing Pennsylvania Dutch quilts within the context of the drabness of the Pennsylvania Dutch woman's existence she says, "...it may have been some unconsciously craved compensation for the drab monotony of their days that caused the women of these households to evolve quilt patterns so intricate. Only a soul in desperate need of nervous outlet could have conceived and executed, for instance, the "Full Blown Tulip"...It is a perfect accomplishment from a needlework standpoint, yet hideous" (she describes it in detail and goes on): "This green-red-lemon-orange combination is enough to set a blind man's teeth on edge...
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Riveting History of Quiltmaking in America April 29, 2000
Format:Paperback
I bought this book about 20 years ago. It was first published in 1929, but it reads as if it were written at the height of the feminist movement in the 70s! The author had a great sense of humor and a marvelous appreciation of how women needed, and found in quilting, an artistic/creative outlet, at a time when just about everything else in their world was controlled or created by men.
She traces the development of techniques and designs, from simple to complex, interweaving her discussion with descriptions of the social and environmental circumstances that influenced design and especially the naming of designs. For example, "It was impossible for the women who every morning viewed nature's most glorious spectacle not to create a 'Rising Sun' quilt pattern. How they loved the sunrise is best proved by the remarkable beauty of the pattern it inspired...It is a triumph of design and is so difficult of execution that only the most expert quilt-makers attempted it. A 'Rising Sun' was post-graduate work, and consequently is one of the rarest and most valuable of quilts."
She traces how pattern names often changed as the quilters' circumstances changed. For example, a pattern that has been known as the "Bear's Paw" (and sometimes as "Hand of Friendship") since the early 1800s in PA and Ohio was called "Duck's-foot-in-the-mud" in Long Island!
Describing Pennsylvania Dutch quilts within the context of the drabness of the Pennsylvania Dutch woman's existence she says, "...it may have been some unconsciously craved compensation for the drab monotony of their days that caused the women of these households to evolve quilt patterns so intricate.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 



Look for Similar Items by Category