Customer Reviews


117 Reviews
5 star:
 (90)
4 star:
 (18)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:
 (5)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


91 of 93 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Fantastic RPG Deckbuilder
I had the pleasure of being able to play this card game at Gencon with one of the early subscribers and it is a TON OF FUN. It is basically a deck building rpg. Now I will start with the fact that this game is not an RPG in the traditional pathfinder/D&D sense. Some of the cards in the game such as the location and scenario cards have some flavor text setting up what your...
Published 15 months ago by James

versus
30 of 36 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fun, but I suspect there is better out there in similar type games...
I bought this game along with several others that might be grouped as the same type (Legends of Drizzt, Mage Knight board game, Mice & Mystic), and this is the only one I have opened and played so far. I had watched many Youtube reviews of Pathfinder ADG which really got me excited about getting it. They were all very positive and it seemed a game to be had! Here's...
Published 13 months ago by R. Harrison


‹ Previous | 1 212 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

91 of 93 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Fantastic RPG Deckbuilder, August 30, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Pathfinder Adventure Card Game: Rise of the Runelords Base Set (Game)
I had the pleasure of being able to play this card game at Gencon with one of the early subscribers and it is a TON OF FUN. It is basically a deck building rpg. Now I will start with the fact that this game is not an RPG in the traditional pathfinder/D&D sense. Some of the cards in the game such as the location and scenario cards have some flavor text setting up what your characters are actually doing but it does not feel like you are really engaged in an adventure and also I really wish they put a little flavor text on all of the item and creature cards although the artwork is fantastic. That being said I love the gameplay. You start off with a deck of cards and that deck represents all of your characters spells, abilities, weapons ect, but that deck also represents your life. So if you take damage you are discarding cards and if you run out of cards than your hero dies. This makes for an excellent hand management system. Basic rundown of the game is in each scenario that you are trying to hunt down a big boss man at these different locations and each location is represented by a deck of cards. On your turn you will flip over the top card at your location and interact with it. The card will either be something bad like a monster or a barrier in which you will have to defeat it or something good like a weapon or item which you can try to acquire and add to your hand. Both of these actions are usually done by passing a stat check which involves you looking at your hero card and rolling an X sided dice based on your hero's stats. And the heros you get to pick feel really unique. Not only does each hero start off with two unique abilities (which can really make a huge difference), but they have different stats which will affect what how easily you can deal with cards at each location. At the end of each scenario your hero gets to rebuild his decks based on the items he found during the game and sometimes even gets a chance to "level up" and permanently increase a stat/hero ability/or card limit on his hero card.

Everything I have said up to now make this game good. But what makes this game great is the blessing deck. At the start of your turn you draw a blessing card from the blessing deck. The deck contains 30 cards I believe, and there are 9 locations. Each location starts with 10 cards and can potentially have more added. This means you have to find the bad guy in these 90 cards within 30 turns, and there is no getting lucky. Even if you are able to defeat the bad guy early on he will run to any location that is not currently closed. This means that many times you have to close locations before you get the chance to mine them for all of those valuable cards and adds a real urgency to the game. In the first game I played we beat the final boss on the last turn. One of the guys at the table had to roll a 7 on two 10 sided dice and he rolled exactly a 7. And I have yet to play a game were we have won with more than 3 cards left in the blessing deck. I really feel like this constantly ticking clock brings this game to a whole new level.

As a final note there are already a bunch of expansions you can pre order which will bring lots of new cards to the game and that is great. But don't thing that just because there are a bunch of expansions they are skimping on the base game. There are still a TON of cards and a TON of treasures to pick from and no reason you cannot have hours and hours of fun with this game. This was my favorite game of Gencon 2013 and I would highly recommend it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


31 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great combination of strategy and cooperation RPG that can be played solo or in a party..., September 2, 2013
This review is from: Pathfinder Adventure Card Game: Rise of the Runelords Base Set (Game)
The Pathfinder Adventure Card Game is a RPG deck builder game.

"The Rise of the Runelords" base set supports up to the 4 players, contains near to 500 cards and 5 scenarios.
The first of bi-monthly released Add-On decks consists of 110 cards and enlarges the number of players up to the 6, also giving additional options for smaller number of players including 3 additional scenarios.
The plan is for game to be expanded every two months with additional 110 cards.

Game is placed in magic land of Varisia where you must defend city of Sandpoint against dark magic, giants and goblins... Your hero alone or a party of 4 companions can choose one of the available classes (Fighter, Wizard, Rogue, Cleric, Bard, Ranger, Sorcerer) and go for a quest against dark forces. Each class has different skills and proficiencies, and RPG-usual ability scores (Dexterity, Strength,...) that are assigned using set of differently sized dice (d4, d6, d8, d10 and d12).

The goal of each game is defeat an enemy in a given number of rounds using different spells, weapons and allies help. The villain has its deck of cards that have different obstacles, enemies and challenges that must be defeated.

Good feature is that characters are becoming more powerful after each game making them capable of winning stronger opponents. Players will acquire stronger spells and unique weapons to their decks that make each subsequent game even more interesting. Nice add-on is that game can be fully played in solo campaign that is great if you aren't able to find one or more partners to play.

The Pathfinder Adventure Card Game is great combination of strategy and cooperation, at the same time providing a lot of fun. The scenarios are infinitely re-playable and each player can build her/his own unique deck using it in combinations that best suit her/his character.

This is a fantastic new game full of potential that I can mostly recommend to the fans of Dungeons & Dragons-like board games but also to all others who like role playing and deck building games.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A solid game, a great experience., September 27, 2013
By 
Hurricanespence (Greensboro, NC, USA) - See all my reviews
= Durability:3.0 out of 5 stars  = Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars  = Educational:3.0 out of 5 stars 
Well, I have to say, I was pleasantly surprised by this one. I expected a deck building game, but it's something entirely different. So let's hit the high points.

What you get: You get almost 500 cards (including your 7 basic heroes), a set of dice (multiple types), and a great tray for storage. You also get the first of many planned expansions; Burnt Offerings. The cards are well made, the art is quite nice (though admittedly that's a style preference). It may not be quite as much chrome (game stuff) as you might get in a larger game, but it's well made stuff and it looks good.

How it plays: The game plays 1-4 people, and it's a cooperative experience. The setup is intimidating the first time, but stick with it. Depending on the number of characters and the scenario, you'll set up a villain, henchmen, and locations to explore. Each location has its own deck of cards including good stuff (weapons, spells, items) and bad stuff (monsters, henchmen, and barriers). To defeat the scenario, you'll have to find the villain and defeat him. You also have to close all the locations (this means defeating henchmen or depleting each location's deck) so that the villain can't escape. You'll have to do this on a timer too. The timer is a deck of cards that gets smaller each time a character takes a turn. More characters means more abilities, but it also means the game moves quicker. All in all, this sounds pretty easy, but it's a little more complicated than that. Each character has their own set of skills and abilities. Some characters are good at old-fashioned combat, some are great at avoiding traps or casting spells. The actual play of the game involves a ton of decisions that you'll need to make, both individually and as a team. Will you split up and try and to move through locations quickly or stay together to help each other out? Will you spend a card from your hand to help a teammate or save it for yourself? The cards in your deck are your hit points and if you run out, you die. Even when you think making a check is a sure thing, the dice may throw things off for you. It's a bit of random chance that makes things more tense and interesting. What's more, the whole thing feels like a real experience. It plays like an old-school dungeon crawl. It's fun, it's thematic, and it's a little different every time.

Let's talk a little about replay value. The game comes with several scenarios to start, and new ones are already coming out in expansions. Your character can keep their decks between sessions; building up better items and spells and gaining experience and new skills. Several scenarios in, it becomes a much scarier thing to have your character die. It's a lot of work to lose, but it makes things more tense. There's also an expansion with new characters that could help mix things up. Even with just what's in the box, I think there's quite a lot of game to go around.

So let's sum it up. This is a card-based dungeon crawl that runs smoothly and plays well. Once you learn the setup it's pretty easy to teach and play, though you'll probably miss a rule or two the first time. It's set up to run a series of games so you can keep your party together, which is a nice touch. You can download character sheets from the publisher's website so you can keep several decks and parties going at the same time without tying up all of your cards. If you can enjoy the theme and the adventure vibe that the game exudes, you'll probably have a very good time with it. It plays well solo, but it's a lot more fun if you bring friends.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


27 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, September 3, 2013
By 
Kenneth Judy (Sherwood, OR United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Pathfinder Adventure Card Game: Rise of the Runelords Base Set (Game)
I got my pre-order of the Pathfinder Adventure Card Game just in time for the weekend. Some friends and I gave it a try, and we couldn't put it down. I consider this a board game, although it is technically a card game. Cards are used to construct the play area and to randomize how each game will play out. This adds a great deal of replay value.

We were all amazed at the game mechanics; the concept is extremely creative. It plays much like Pathfinder in that each player selects a character and goes on adventures fighting foes, gaining allies, and collecting treasure. What really amazed us is they managed to capture the feel of your character progressing and getting more powerful. Each character is represented by 15 cards. You build your character out of basic cards that you can replace and improve as you adventure. After you complete the basic scenario, you add cards for the first Rise of the Runelords scenario. These cards are a little better or more challenging. Later in the game, there are rules to remove less challenging cards from the card pool. This is done as they are encountered to phase them out over time and to keep the difficulty ramping up.

Each character plays very differently, but we found them to be well balanced. We played with 4 players, and we did not have the character expansion pack. Because a character is represented by 15 cards, you need to put those cards back into the card pool when you are not playing a character. Otherwise there is a shortage of cards to draw from. Paizo has free downloadable character sheets to track character progress and the contents of each character deck.

Games take about 1 to 1 and 1/2 hours to play. We got faster as we got to know the rules. I describe this as a complex game. I am an avid Pathfinder fan and a gamer, so I enjoy complexity, and much of that complexity wanes as you get familiar with the flow. Non-gamers may find the initial learning of the rules difficult. We had to refer to the rulebook often as new situations came up. We are all gamers, and we had some pretty complex rules questions. We have so far been able to answer all of them with a careful re-reading of the rules. That speaks volumes to how much play testing and attention to detail was involved in designing this game.

The greatest problem with the game will probably be sorting cards. It takes 15 minutes or so to randomize and setup each game. If you change characters or players, you need to swap in/out their character cards. Some cards are unique, and I don't see a way to handle two character who each acquired a unique card individually. I am playing with my friends, so I will need to remove the RotRL cards to play the starting scenario with my wife.

The game is very high quality. The cards are sturdy. The box is sturdy and has room to hold expansion cards. The artwork is nice. I am definitely happy with my purchase. All told this is a brilliantly-creative high-quality game with excellent attention to detail and the classic Paizo support. I anticipate many hours of enjoyment with it.

Does this game provide spoilers for the Rise of the Runelords Pathfinder campaign? I have to say yes. The mechanics of the game differ from Pathfinder enough that it doesn't provide tactical spoilers, but the characters are the same. Your PCs may not know that a certain NPC in Sandpoint is evil until the Adventure Card Game depicts them as a villain. Observant players will certainly notice they will be fighting a goblin druid and a goblin who rides a lizard. Although I haven't seen the cards yet, the potential for a spoiler in the Skinsaw Murders scenario is significant. Ultimately it will be up to each group to decide how many small spoilers it will take to have an impact on their adventure. Of course, if you have already played the RotRL adventure, you can reminisce about it while playing the Adventure Card Game.

Download the free character sheets from Paizo. There is a video of the game being played on YouTube. It is over 30 minutes long and will help if you are still not sure about this game.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


30 of 36 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fun, but I suspect there is better out there in similar type games..., October 20, 2013
By 
R. Harrison (Stephenville, TX United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Pathfinder Adventure Card Game: Rise of the Runelords Base Set (Game)
I bought this game along with several others that might be grouped as the same type (Legends of Drizzt, Mage Knight board game, Mice & Mystic), and this is the only one I have opened and played so far. I had watched many Youtube reviews of Pathfinder ADG which really got me excited about getting it. They were all very positive and it seemed a game to be had! Here's what I found after playing through 6 scenarios (I lack 2 to complete the game) over a 24 hour period:

The rules have a few places that could use better clarification--not much, but there is some of this and I am a rules stickler so I don't like it. Some of these instances can be figured out with checking the general consensus of other players via message boards and some you can formulate what you think is intended after referencing several different areas in the manual where the concept is mentioned to come to some sort of derived answer. It'd be a lot easier for game designers to really spend the extra time to add several more words or sentences to COMPLETELY describe a concept so there isn't anything left to the imagination as to what exactly was meant, but technical writing is apparently more of an art then it might seem.

As far as play--it's fun--for a while. For me, 24 hours and 5 scenarios later, it's just not as fun and I expect the 'fun' factor with any game to take much longer than 24 hours to start to wear down. Usually its the first few plays of a complicated game (compared to uno or something) that can have the fun factor hampered because of all the rule checking interruptions. However, I'm much faster at it now since I don't have to reference the rule book and the internet forums like I did the first 3 scenarios, but I am losing excitement steam for the game rather that finding it more enjoyable with less interruptions. I think it is because every new scenario is just more of the same. There is no story to speak of unless you count the paragraph on each location, scenario, and adventure card as 'story'. What it really boils down to is each scenario is randomly generated monsters, items, spells, weapons, armor, blessing, and barriers with scenario specific henchman and a scenario specific Villain. This concept of mixing randomness with a few specifics isn't new and there's nothing wrong with it except here it feels empty with no other specifics (besides the Villain/henchmen). All scenarios are literally exactly the same(random everything except henchmen and boss) down to the 3 location stacks each time for my two characters to 'adventure' through. Locations get repeated too in different scenarios so even if you would argue that locations are strikingly different from one another and provide some sort of real different adventure (I would strongly argue with you that you are wrong) you can't argue that you don't get to see some of the same ones again. But I digress... So with each scenario you have 3-6 location decks depending upon the number of characters playing and you just pick one to start at with each character and move around working your way through each deck trying to find the henchmen and the Villain. This gets very monotonous due to the lack of each scenario being tailor made--having some sort of unique point A to B to C quest with surprises along the way as is very standard in the RPG genre.

I also find after having played it a while, too many of the cards do too similar of the same thing--'adding a die roll to a check' and slight variations of this being one example. There also appears to be a lot of unnecessary information on many cards describing the traits of the monster or item. It would be okay, it's just that most of the information thus far (2/3 of the way through the game) is never used. I haven't found that it matters that a "Rat Swarm" is an 'animal' or that an "Enchanter" is a 'veteran'. Does it matter that she does 'force' damage to me? I haven't come across anything specific to 'force' damage to know why I would care. What does the description "Finesse" amount to on a Dagger +1? I understand 'melee' and 'ranged' and 'piercing' versus 'bludgeoning' but I think they either put in a lot of descriptions that they never implemented or they will be implemented in future add-ons and will just be curious labels until then. Either way, it reminds me of playing a beta MMO once where there were some features on the HUD that look interesting, but were not talked about and didn't appear to be used. I find this sort of thing frustrating.

Lastly, and really my biggest gripe is what determines success or failure. Is it dependent on your skill in choosing which cards to play? A little bit. Is it dependent on which characters you choose to play? Somewhat. Is it dependent on where in the scenario stacks the 'henchman' and 'villian' ended up? Bingo! Quite frankly, if enough of the henchman and/or the Villain are near the top in the stacks, you have an extremely good chance of winning the scenario regardless of other factors. If most of the henchman and/or the Villain are near the bottom of the stacks, you will lose (not probably, you most definitely will). This is just simple mathematics. You have 30 turns at best during each scenario (you can lose some too). Each scenario's location deck is 10 cards deep. With a single character you will have 3 location decks. With two characters, like I play, you have 4 location decks. With more characters you have more location decks per scenario up to a max of 6 characters and 8 location decks. Each deck has either a henchman or the Villain. Your goal is to find them because when you do, you have a chance to 'close' the location and eliminate all the cards and therefore the turns you would have spent searching that location for the Villain. Each turn you can 'encounter' one card from one deck if you don't use powers or cards from your hand to do more. Some cards allow you to 'explore' the deck again and turn over another card. But anyway, without going to much into the game mechanics, do the math: At best its 30 turns for 30 cards (3 decks x 10 cards per deck) with a solo character play style. I've got 30 turns for 40 cards (4 decks x 10 cards per deck). I have easily won all scenarios I have played except the last one. I lost and I still had 2 of the four locations open and almost totally untouched. After I ran out of turns, I looked though the last two decks and the henchman was at the very bottom of one of the decks and the Villain was 2nd from the bottom on the other deck. That would have taken about another 15 turns to get to them. Both location decks I was able to 'close' took all 30 turns due to the henchman being near the bottom of each deck and failing some 'checks' that didn't allow me to remove a card from the deck (it got shuffled back in) when I 'explored' it and turned it over. But regardless of missing some checks, due to the way the henchmen and Villain were shuffled into the decks (down deep), before I played my first turn, that game was doomed to be lost because there was no way to go through that many cards with only 30 turns. After catching on to this concept, I thought back and realized that all the scenarios I won before this failed one had most of the henchmen and/or the Villain in the top 1/2 of each location deck.

And I can only imagine the game is much harder to win with more characters playing at once since that will mean more location decks. However, I need to correct myself... It won't be harder as in more challenging. The game play will be unchanged: Same random cards and same generic scenario setup. It's only the odds of having henchman and the Villain too far away from the top on too many decks to be able to win in 30 turns (you still get 30 turns no matter how many characters are playing). So THIS is the real deal breaker for me. Your fate really is highly correlated to the position of the important bad guys in the random stacks of decks that you must go through. This is not so much adventurous to me and is more like a casino game. And that realization doesn't make me get excited to sit down to a game that is already decided before I start my first turn.

So, for recap, it's not a bad game, but I don't think it is a great game. From what I understand, it's mechanics are very unique from other games in this genre (that's probably a good thing for the other games :) ). I just don't know how long it will hold one's attention once the mechanics are figured out and several scenarios are played and it all starts to seem the same topped off with realizing your playing prowess has little to do with whether you win or not. But not to be too pessimistic (too late), regardless of the monotony, I have enjoyed it and will likely repeat the scenario I lost and finish the other 2 scenarios, but I have quickly gotten into the mode of just wanting to complete the next scenario more as a check off list (mainly to satisfy my OCD nature), versus looking forward to the 'adventure' of it--since that's missing in my opinion. If you feel like $45 is a good spend for a weekend of fun, you will probably feel okay buying this game even if you suffer from what ails me. Lot's of people seem to really like this game, and I what they were saying sounded great to me. It's just that after getting it in my hands I'm just starting to feel like I'm not one of them and after I open up some of those other treasures I bought and give them a spin, I have a feeling I may never come back to Pathfinder Adventure Card Game.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic adventure game, October 3, 2013
= Durability:4.0 out of 5 stars  = Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars  = Educational:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This is a very clever game that gives you the feel of an adventure and cooperative game play. What's cool about this game is you get to personalize your character through items, spells, weapons, armor, etc. This deck is persistent and stays with your character through his/her life. You get to level your character and when you encounter an upgrade in your equipment, you feel like you have really earned it.

The game mechanic is quite simple. Your deck is comprised of various types of cards..like spells, allies, items, armor, etc. These are fixed and are defined by your character type (fighter, cleric, wizard, etc). The deck is also your health. Run out of cards, and your character die. As you use your powers, you gradually "lose health". If you fail to defeat a monster, you lose cards from your hand....which accelerates your deck depletion.

The game comes with two series of adventures..which is made up of 3 or so scenarios. Your job is to assemble the appropriate villains and obstacles in these "enemy" decks. This is the main downside of this game...it does take a bit of time to assemble the adventure...and sort the cards out afterwards.

Your character work in conjunction with your other friends to defeat the game. Some characters such as the fighter work best when he is with another party member at the same location, while others work better being alone...like the rogue and the ranger. Some characters are better at overcoming things that are strength based (fighters) while others are good at overcoming wisdom/int types of challenges. Your job is to overcome the obstacles according to your character's strengths and the obstacles that you face.

Anyway, the box is huge. The cards and the quality is fantastic. While the price for the game is fairly high, it is well worth the price...the box is huge. The picture in Amazon is a bit deceptive. This box is almost 2 times the size of other game boxes...and it has slots for future expansions.

Anyway, this has become one of our most popular games in our group. I highly recommend this game.

Get it!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars I'm a big fan of Paizo, and Pathfinder, but this game is just not that fun. . ., January 6, 2014
This review is from: Pathfinder Adventure Card Game: Rise of the Runelords Base Set (Game)
So I'm the contrarian here. . .

The idea of building your deck across games as a leveling mechanism is brilliant. However, that is pretty much all this game has going for it.

The rules are complex the first time you read through them, which is funny, because the game boils down to turning a card over, and rolling a die or dice to beat the number on the card. Seriously, that's the mechanic. Sure, you can modify your roll with the cards in your hand, or ask other players for help with a spell or blessing, but that's about all the strategy there. The story is non-existent, so all the characters, locations, monsters, traps, and boons are window dressing for, "Turn over a card, try to beat the number on the card."

By the fifth time we played, I was ready to put it away for good. It just feels like work. The only way you can really lose is if the villain is buried somewhere at the bottom of the last location deck. Total luck.

There's also a lot of downtime where your waiting for others to finish turns. You'll want the TV on to pass the time. Which I guess was actually a benefit of the game, as we played a lot during the MLB playoffs, and it was easy to watch the game, and play at the same time.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A box full of awesome, December 9, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Pathfinder Adventure Card Game: Rise of the Runelords Base Set (Game)
This is my first "living card game" experience and have to say that it's been stellar so far. As an old RPG/boardgame geek who rarely has the time anymore, Pathfinder ACG makes for a nearly-perfect fit.

I've been playing solo, with the wife, and with the wife and a friend, and no matter how I play it's been a hoot every time. Of course it's more fun played "socially", but it works just fine solo too. The play is pretty fast-paced once you've become accustomed to the rules, and there's lots of action---and challenging decisions to make on almost every turn.

One thing I'm really impressed by is how well the designer balanced the game, not only in how it scales depending on how many players are playing, but how each scenario (and each fight within) is full of tension and tough decisions. After about fifteen plays so far, the challenge level seems just right; I've lost three times, but only once has victory felt too easy (mostly due to some stellar dice-rolls and "luck of the draw" more than anything). Almost inevitably, victories are hard-fought affairs and go right down to the wire, with the issue in doubt all the way. Never a dull moment!

Another upside to PACG is that it plays fairly quickly. Each scenario usually takes about 90 minutes from setup to completion, so one can get in a scenario or two on a weekday evening.

This past weekend, three of us played through three scenarios and it was an absolute blast. The last one was particularly memorable as we were down to the last few turns, pretty beat up, and facing a fairly grim situation in terms of being able to "snatch victory from the jaws of defeat". Long story short, we spent several minutes hashing out a strategy that we felt would give us our best chance to win, and then went "all in". The result was three grown adults yelling, pumping fists in the air and high-fiving like they'd just won a Super Bowl or something.

If I had to say something critical/negative of Pathfinder ACG, it would be that there are some typos/omissions/etc here and there on the cards and in the rulebook, and it does take a bit to sort out some of the rules. Most of that, however, has been addressed by the designer at this point via online errata, and the fact that he and the team have been active on the publisher's website forums, answering questions and clarifying rules. And of course there are always veteran players available to help via the internet. It's not a difficult game by any stretch---especially if you are already familiar with role playing/fantasy gaming at all, and I'm assuming you probably are if you're reading these reviews---so don't be deterred by any of that.

I'm well into the second adventure deck of Rise of the Runelords ("Burnt Offerings") and can't wait to see what the third ("The Skinsaw Murders") brings. And with Paizo planning to mirror the adventures from the full Pathfinder RPG as they release new content for the card game, there should be a HUGE amount of gaming entertainment coming down the pipeline from PACG....potentially 400+ scenarios in total over the course of the game, if they do in fact mirror the RPG exactly.

Bottom line: if you like board/dice/card games and have even a passing interest in fantasy lore, do yourself a favor and get Pathfinder Adventure Card Game: Rise of the Runelords.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Addicting Adventure, October 4, 2013
First, the basics. This game fills a niche that other games have tried to fill: a game with a sense of progression. The difference from something like Descent: Journeys in the Dark or the D&D board games is a little less complexity, while still maintaining the sense that your adventures are building up to a climactic battle.

My wife and I enjoy this game, as it takes us about an hour to play--give or take. It's hard to find a cooperative game that fits nicely into that timeframe. Granted, we could (and would) keep going and play more scenarios, but usually our time is limited as gamer parents.

As to the game's components, the game consists of cards and dice, and as such, card sleeves are a must. Penny sleeves work fine, but the cards get shuffled a lot. I think the cards are about as durable as cards get--so no complaints there. Plus, cards are easier to store than miniatures or plastic figurines, so that's a plus if you put a premium on storage space. The illustrations are vivid enough that you are immersed in the game's world.

As to genre of game, even the rule book seems confused (it shies away from calling the game an RPG). This isn't entirely a deck building game--but it comes close. It has aspects of a living card game, where installments of the game come out to expand the scope of the game.

That's the deck building aspect: you can acquire new cards from the ever-growing collection by exploring locations and rolling high enough on dice. It's not entirely random as you and your allies can choose when it's worth using cards and powers to affect dice roles. At the end of a successful game, you can customize a character's deck with cards in quantities the character can legally use.

Each character can keep 15 cards to start, and only cards of certain types. This gives the game high stakes, seeing as your character can die and have to start over, losing all the cards you worked to accumulate.

Once these cards are used up, if a character would be required to draw a card, they have been defeated. Between the 15 card deck for each character and the 30 card countdown timer (1card is discarded per turn), you or you and friends must race against time to corner and defeat a bad guy or achieve another win condition.

The pros:
Nice concept that captures the RPG elements of character development and adventuring cooperatively.
Mechanics are easier and less time intensive than regular RPGs
A variety of characters and scenarios, as well as a variety of cards keep the adventures interesting
The sense of progression, instead of playing a single game session and being done, is a welcome change
You can design your own scenarios, if you wish, which increases replay value for those with the patience and creativity (not that there isn't lots to do)

Cons
May still be technical for people who don't routinely play games (but not unlearnable).
Eventually, your group will complete the adventures, and want more. The next set is in October 2013, but it depends on how fast your group moves as to whether there is downtime or not between releases.

Bottom line: go ahead and get the game. If you love cooperative play, this is not to be missed!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great (!!!) for Solo Play, December 20, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Pathfinder Adventure Card Game: Rise of the Runelords Base Set (Game)
Not many board games have a good solo component. In Pathfinder Adventure Card Game you can play a single, self sufficient character like the warrior or rogue or play two characters (even three) that complement each other. Add a wizard or healer to the warrior to make better use of boons (good cards) encountered.

Easiest to learn by watching a play through video (see: Critical Review's videos) then reading the rules, setting up a first scenario along with it.

Simply put its a game where your character has different strengths and skills and set number of cards to battle or otherwise confront benefits and risks in several "dungeons" decks to ultimately defeat a villain, possible some mini-bosses or achieve other goals by using modifiable dice rolls in ordered turns within a card-based "time limit."

It appears that the Adventure Path comes in 6 parts called Adventures, the first one in the box and the rest purchasable. Several scenarios (battles with boses/goals) make up each Adventure. So if the Adventure Path was the book, the Scenarios are the many captures, grouped into parts. There is enough to play some hours before exhausting the first Adventure. You may extend this by playing addtional characters with or without someone else (which means scenarios have more content) or playing through more than once. A character may not get the big rewards at the end of the scenario or Adventure more than once, but they may be able to pick up more good cards to customize their deck.

There is a Character Add-on adds enough cards to be able to keep 6 characters in progress as the base game supports 4 (you use many cards during the actual adventures.) This is good if you want to try other play styles or just want more items and more active characters to switch between.

You'll spend a couple hours scratching your head, then you'll realize its a fairly simple card and dice combat game with neat modifications to the rules. You really just play the cards with a few consistent core rules on top.

Recommended!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 212 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Pathfinder Adventure Card Game: Rise of the Runelords Base Set
$59.99 $45.30
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.