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Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture [Hardcover]

by Martin Fowler
4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (84 customer reviews)

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Book Description

November 15, 2002 0321127420 978-0321127426 1

The practice of enterprise application development has benefited from the emergence of many new enabling technologies. Multi-tiered object-oriented platforms, such as Java and .NET, have become commonplace. These new tools and technologies are capable of building powerful applications, but they are not easily implemented. Common failures in enterprise applications often occur because their developers do not understand the architectural lessons that experienced object developers have learned.

 

Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture is written in direct response to the stiff challenges that face enterprise application developers. The author, noted object-oriented designer Martin Fowler, noticed that despite changes in technology--from Smalltalk to CORBA to Java to .NET--the same basic design ideas can be adapted and applied to solve common problems. With the help of an expert group of contributors, Martin distills over forty recurring solutions into patterns. The result is an indispensable handbook of solutions that are applicable to any enterprise application platform.

 

This book is actually two books in one. The first section is a short tutorial on developing enterprise applications, which you can read from start to finish to understand the scope of the book's lessons. The next section, the bulk of the book, is a detailed reference to the patterns themselves. Each pattern provides usage and implementation information, as well as detailed code examples in Java or C#. The entire book is also richly illustrated with UML diagrams to further explain the concepts.

Armed with this book, you will have the knowledge necessary to make important architectural decisions about building an enterprise application and the proven patterns for use when building them.

 

The topics covered include

·  Dividing an enterprise application into layers

·  The major approaches to organizing business logic

·  An in-depth treatment of mapping between objects and relational databases

·  Using Model-View-Controller to organize a Web presentation

·  Handling concurrency for data that spans multiple transactions

·  Designing distributed object interfaces


Frequently Bought Together

Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture + Enterprise Integration Patterns: Designing, Building, and Deploying Messaging Solutions + Service Design Patterns: Fundamental Design Solutions for SOAP/WSDL and RESTful Web Services
Price for all three: $140.68

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Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

The practice of enterprise application development has benefited from the emergence of many new enabling technologies. Multi-tiered object-oriented platforms, such as Java and .NET, have become commonplace. These new tools and technologies are capable of building powerful applications, but they are not easily implemented. Common failures in enterprise applications often occur because their developers do not understand the architectural lessons that experienced object developers have learned.

Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture is written in direct response to the stiff challenges that face enterprise application developers. The author, noted object-oriented designer Martin Fowler, noticed that despite changes in technology--from Smalltalk to CORBA to Java to .NET--the same basic design ideas can be adapted and applied to solve common problems. With the help of an expert group of contributors, Martin distills over forty recurring solutions into patterns. The result is an indispensable handbook of solutions that are applicable to any enterprise application platform.

This book is actually two books in one. The first section is a short tutorial on developing enterprise applications, which you can read from start to finish to understand the scope of the book's lessons. The next section, the bulk of the book, is a detailed reference to the patterns themselves. Each pattern provides usage and implementation information, as well as detailed code examples in Java or C#. The entire book is also richly illustrated with UML diagrams to further explain the concepts.

Armed with this book, you will have the knowledge necessary to make important architectural decisions about building an enterprise application and the proven patterns for use when building them.

The topics covered include:

  • Dividing an enterprise application into layers
  • The major approaches to organizing business logic
  • An in-depth treatment of mapping between objects and relational databases
  • Using Model-View-Controller to organize a Web presentation
  • Handling concurrency for data that spans multiple transactions
  • Designing distributed object interfaces


  • 0321127420B10152002

    About the Author

    Martin Fowler is an independent consultant who has applied objects to pressing business problems for more than a decade. He has consulted on systems in fields such as health care, financial trading, and corporate finance. His clients include Chrysler, Citibank, UK National Health Service, Andersen Consulting, and Netscape Communications. In addition, Fowler is a regular speaker on objects, the Unified Modeling Language, and patterns.



    0321127420AB07242003

    Product Details

    • Hardcover: 560 pages
    • Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional; 1 edition (November 15, 2002)
    • Language: English
    • ISBN-10: 0321127420
    • ISBN-13: 978-0321127426
    • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 7.6 x 1.3 inches
    • Shipping Weight: 2.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
    • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (84 customer reviews)
    • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #10,892 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

    More About the Author

    For all of my career I've been interested in the design and architecture of software systems, particularly those loosely classed as Enterprise Applications. I firmly believe that poor software design leads to software that is difficult to change in response to growing needs, and encourages buggy software that saps the productivity of computer users everywhere.
    I'm always trying to find out what designs are effective, what approaches lead people into trouble, how we can organize our work to do better designs, and how to communicate what I've learned to more people. My books and website are all ways in which I can share what I learn and I'm glad I've found a way to make a living doing this.

    Customer Reviews

    Most Helpful Customer Reviews
    105 of 113 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars Great book, but nothing particularly new February 20, 2003
    Format:Hardcover
    I agree wholeheartedly with an above post which pointed out that the subject material is mostly known to the average enterprise developer. I am at best an average developer and found I'd already thought of much of this stuff myself.
    One thing I would like to add is that this book was still excellent reading and skimming through the patterns sparked my creative energies. I find that when I read through it, even if I 'know' the patterns already, it helps me explore their organization and consequences.
    I was disappointed that I wasn't blown away with helpful new concepts, but quite happy with my purchase all the same. Buy this if you want a thorough guide to EAA and maybe some enjoyable afternoon reading.
    (The following was added about 2 months after the original review) After owning this book for awhile, I've found it more and more indispensible. My original review, above, mentions that few of the concepts seem new, however, now that I've read it more thoroughly and applied some of the concepts, I don't think that 'mind-blowing originality' is what I should have been looking for.
    Fowler's 'Refactoring' is another example of a great book without any stunningly original concepts. Like Refactoring, PEAA can serve as a great guide to page through when you're stuck on a project and need to review your options.
    Was this review helpful to you?
    33 of 34 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars The right path to creating enterprise applications. October 3, 2003
    Format:Hardcover
    Fowler avoids giving a precise definition of an enterprise application, preferring to list a set of characteristics that most share. In general, they are very large systems, with many user interface screens used to concurrently access and update an enormous amount of data. In nearly all cases, the data must be persistent, in fact it most often is very persistent, meaning that it has to live through iterations of the software, alterations of the operating system, changes in the hardware, and staff and programmer turnover.
    Furthermore, enterprise applications usually must communicate with other applications, which are often just as large and complex. Examples include payroll and patient records, credit card processing, insurance claim processing, banking, and foreign exchange trading. In short, most of the programs that run the modern global economy, which are many of the most complex software projects currently in use. Finally, the programs must be constructed so that they can be "easily and quickly" changed by people who did not create them to adapt to conditions that can change very quickly and often without any input from the programmer. With so much at stake, there must be a set of best practices, which is what is captured in this book.
    The patterns of software construction explained by Fowler are generally in the small, in the sense that they describe specific operations rather than demonstrate a large architectural form. Each of the specific patterns is presented by first listing a one-sentence description of the purpose of the pattern and a UML diagram illustrating the structure. This is followed by sections describing how the pattern works, when to use it and one or more examples demonstrating specific implementations of the pattern using source code skeletons.
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    37 of 40 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars Best J2EE / .Net Design Pattern Book December 13, 2002
    Format:Hardcover
    This is the best book I've found on J2EE and .Net patterns. I think it's destined to become a classic. I found the discussions on when to distrbute ('sell your favorite grandmother first'), Unit Of Work, Domain Model and Data Mapper patterns extremely useful. It has changed the way I think about enterprise applications.
    I think it fits somewhere between the original 'Design Patterns' book, by Gamma, et al, and a book like 'J2EE Patterns' in terms of its scope. 'Design Patterns' describes existing patterns that are applicable to any kind of application. 'J2EE Patterns' describes patterns in terms of one platform (although many of them apply to other platforms as well.) Fowler's book describes a set of patterns that work with a certain kind of application, business apps, but that are applicable to more than one platform.
    It's better than the 'J2EE Patterns' book, which doesn't do a good job explaining which parts of J2EE to avoid, and which 'patterns' are in fact workarounds for problems in the platform itself. (For example, the 'Composite Entity' pattern.)
    I have to strongly disagree with the first reviewer. Fowler does explain which patterns work best on which platform. The first section of the book gives a good road map for deciding which set of patterns to use for your app. He mentions explicitly that .Net pulls you in the direction of Table Module, but that with J2EE you would be less likely to use that pattern.
    As far as the patterns being available in frameworks, I still find it useful to know about the patterns the framework implements. That way you know which framework to select. We recently went through an O/R mapping tool selection process.
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    29 of 32 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars Required reading, but definite J2EE bias June 23, 2003
    Format:Hardcover
    I am a fan of Fowler's and especially his "Refactoring" book, which I also rate as a must read for the serious programmer.
    Fowler's new book is an attempt to do for Enterprise Application Architecture what "Design Patterns" (i.e., GOF) did for OOP.
    Unfortunately,while it is an excellent book, there are issues...
    1)First, Design Patterns is a very dense and scholarly read. It is also, frankly, a difficult read. However, after you have spent a couple of days trying to digest a pattern from Design Patterns, you realize, in many cases, you have had an experience with something profound. Even the GOF authors, in the preface, attempt to console readers by admitting "We didn't understand it all on the first writing!". Fowler's book, by contrast, is not on the same level, and can be understood on a first read. Perhaps this is what other reviewers were sensing when they indicated it was for the novice architect?
    2) Fowler does NOT address security. How then,does the word "Enterprise" get the priviledge of adorning the title of his book? Enterprise design should be secure design. But, this will usually require a trade off --- more secure, less performance...or less secure, more scaleable...Fowler does not consider this. Example: A chapter is devoted to the "Table Data GateWay" pattern. The gateway pattern might be OK for J2EE...but it is not the most secure, or the best for performance,in .Net... The problem is it constructs its SQL statements in line, rather than using stored procedures. This allows SQL insertion attacks if your coders are sloppy, and also does not take advantage of the precompiled nature of sprocs.
    3)There is a J2EE bias.
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    Most Recent Customer Reviews
    4.0 out of 5 stars Great reference book
    It is a great reference resource. A must have for a serious developer. This is a must have for every architect.
    Published 3 months ago by N. Murali Mohan
    4.0 out of 5 stars Essential book for enterprise application
    There is no doubt that Martin Fowler has a significant writing style. On the other hand we must remember that the book has been written in the year 2002 or earlier. Read more
    Published 4 months ago by Ashraghi
    5.0 out of 5 stars Great and saved money over the book store
    This book is the exact same that the bookstore had for my class however it was way cheaper than getting it through the bookstore.
    Published 8 months ago by Joe
    5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book
    A must read for all the professional working in enterprise java related technologies.
    This has got lot of references. it covers most of the patterns.
    Published 11 months ago by rudra
    5.0 out of 5 stars Rock solid basics, worth reading even in 2013
    What can possibly a rather young kid such as myself learn from 11 years book /as of 2013/ on architecture of enterprise applications? Well as it turns out, a lot. Read more
    Published 11 months ago by vrto
    5.0 out of 5 stars Great
    Cover is hard and protective, pages are floppy and easily turned, doesn't require too much muscle power to get to the next page. Could use more pictures of kittens. Read more
    Published 11 months ago by Lizardcandy
    5.0 out of 5 stars A must have for all coders
    One of the best books I have ever read. i had the actual book but wanted this one for my e-reader. This is a book you will want to read more than once. Read more
    Published 14 months ago by David Marta
    5.0 out of 5 stars Very good book
    I actually read part of this book couple of years ago, but never had an opportunity to read it all.
    If you are serious about programming, this is a 'must have' piece.
    Published 14 months ago by Victor Farazdagi
    5.0 out of 5 stars Great book
    I buy this for a friend and is a really good book that goes deep on the subject of the enterprise patterns
    Published 14 months ago by Andres Serrano Garcia
    5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent read for any medium or large scale project
    I found this book to be a great resource for understanding many of the prominent frameworks like ORM, ESB and MVC work. Read more
    Published 16 months ago by Jason Meckley
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