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Patterns in Java: A Catalog of Reusable Design Patterns Illustrated with UML, 2nd Edition, Volume 1 Paperback – September 24, 2002

ISBN-13: 978-0471227298 ISBN-10: 0471227293 Edition: 2nd Edition, Volume 1

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 544 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 2nd Edition, Volume 1 edition (September 17, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0471227293
  • ISBN-13: 978-0471227298
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 1.3 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (65 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,185,532 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Software design patterns let developers reuse tried-and-true designs in new projects. For the state of the art in object design, consider Patterns in Java, perhaps the best book that Java developers have at their disposal for getting leading-edge pattern expertise in a convenient and well-organized volume.

The guide opens with background on pattern research, including the groundbreaking Design Patterns. This new title goes further, with 41 software patterns, all illustrated with UML diagrams and sample Java code. Early patterns, such as Delegation and Proxy, show how classes can work together without relying on inheritance. Next come creational patterns, such as the Factory and Builder patterns and the newer Object Pool pattern (which can be used to pool database connections for faster performance).

Subsequent sections move on to partitioning patterns, such as the Layered Initialization, as well as structural patterns, such as the Adapter, Facade, and Flyweight patterns. A section on behavioral patterns mixes older patterns such as the Chain of Responsibility and the Strategy with newer designs such as the Little Language and Snapshot patterns. The book closes with seven newer patterns for designing distributed and multitasked systems. --Richard Dragan --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Back Cover

In-depth coverage of forty-seven Java design patterns

Since the publication of the first edition in 1998, programmers and developers have been waiting eagerly for an update to this expert guide on how to use Java in conjunction with the timesaving design patterns that have surfaced in the past few years. With the new edition of his bestselling Patterns in Java, Volume 1, Mark Grand brings you up to date with the latest release of Java and many of the important concerns facing Java programmers today.

If you are a programmer or developer who wants to take advantage of new patterns, but doesn't have the time or experience to document them for your organization, this book is for you. As with the first edition, each pattern is documented in UML and, where appropriate, a code example or an example in the core Java API is provided.

This comprehensive book gives you:
* Seven fundamental design patterns
* Six creational patterns
* Three partitioning patterns
* Nine structural patterns
* Eleven behavioral patterns
* Eleven concurrency patterns
* UML documentation of all 47 patterns
* Practical, hands-on examples of pattern implementation in Java

The companion Web site containing all of the Java source code and UML models from the book.

Customer Reviews

This books is the fastest way to understand design patterns.
Vyacheslav Lanovets
When I sat down to try and implement some of the patterns, I found flaws in the code that comes with the book, shoddy written examples and poor explanations.
Chris007
At the other end of the spectrum, Grand points to "marker" interfaces, Java interfaces with identities but not content, as a design pattern.
wiredweird

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

56 of 59 people found the following review helpful By John Sargeant on November 5, 1999
Format: Paperback
There appears to be a flame war in a bookshop about this book, with everybody giving it either 1 star or 5. I believe the truth is somewhere in between.
I'm using the book as a course text for a final year undergraduate course I'm teaching which focusses on patterns. It's far from ideal, but there's nothing out there better as far as I know. There are many typos and thing which could be explained better, but I disagree with those reviewers who claim that the author doesn't understand the subject - in my opinion he clearly does. With one exception (the bizzare characterisation of Marker Interface as a fundamental design pattern) I don't believe there's anything fundamentally wrong.
I'd like to encourage those people who are complaining that it's rubbish to either write a better book, or contribute detailed comments to the author, so he can produce an improved second edition (I'll be doing the latter). It has the potential to be a very good book.
I agree with those who are saying that that volume 2 is very disappointing, but reviews of that shouldn't be contributing to the "score" of volume 1.
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26 of 29 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 22, 1999
Format: Paperback
Having written several Java books myself and being a self confessed design pattern addict, I was looking forward to reading this book. Unfortunately I was immensely disappointed with the content. I agree with most of the negative comments written here about both Vols 1 and 2 and only add my own voice to the crowd to ensure the weight of numbers prevails.
The big problem with this book is that it is _so_ inaccurate, both syntactically and semantically, you cannot _trust_ the content.
Some of the text is accurate: for example the description of the Visitor pattern is semantically fairly accurate although there are numerous typos and diagramming errors. However, the accompanying code is not a Visitor pattern. Since the key benefit of this book over other design pattern books is that the code is in Java, the usefulness of the book is lost.
The net effect is that the beginner will not learn design patterns correctly.
Given that a major benefit of design patterns is the common understanding of certain coding idioms, this is a very damaging book. It is like learning to play the piano the wrong way - once the damage is done to the technique it can take years of hard work to repair. You are much better off learning to play properly from the beginning. In the context of design patterns, this means reading the GoF, Siemens, and Doug Lea books.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Brandon Shuey on November 22, 2000
Format: Paperback
I was really excited for a Java-slanted version of the famous Design Patterns book. This should have been an easy home run but Grand let us down on the details. I went into this book knowing some about Patterns and was eager to learn more. However, after wasting my time hacking my way through incorrect diagrams and inconsistencies between code and text I am about ready to through the book out, learn C and read Gamma's book. I don't know who edited this book but they obviously didn't know much about UML or Code.
You want detail examples: Chapter Eight (Chain of Responsibility GoF95). A pretty simple pattern made difficult because of the incorrect UML diagram in the context (association arrows going the wrong direction), and the incorrect text conflicting with the code. I figured the pattern out by comparing it to Gamma's example, it is really quite simple.
The there are many more examples, especially frustrating on some of the more abstract patterns. Grand should have hired a better editor.
If you buy this book and know little about patterns I suggest you also get Gamma's book and refer to it often.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Jason Osgood (mrosgood@yahoo.com) on April 28, 1999
Format: Paperback
Like others, I eagerly anticipated an encyclopedia of design patterns implemented in Java. Alas...
I've hosted a bimonthly design pattern discussion group for just over a year. We recently began studying patterns from Grand's book which we had not yet covered. I acknowledge that I hold my opinions more strongly and am more vocal than most, and I would never try to speak on behalf of others. Even so, I think it would be fair to say that our study circle's concensus is "Patterns in Java, Vol 1" is a poor book.
I, of course, have a much stronger opinion: I think "Patterns in Java" is actually detrimental to both the design pattern and Java communities. The writing is terrifically bad. The errors are countless. The intepretation, context, and presentation of the patterns are misguided at best. The example implementations are remarkably sophomoric. As one wag put it, "This book is an excellent source of anti-patterns." An item by item critique of "Patterns in Java" would be roughly twice as long as the book itself; certainly not a task I would relish.
I've been advised to take the good with the bad. Sure, no book is perfect. For instance, our circle was less than satisfied with the presentation of both Flyweight and Intepreter in "Design Patterns" by Gamma et al. But I think we all agree that "Design Patterns" is an excellent book overall. I also accept that patterns appearing in the PLoP books are sometimes formative. Schucks, I even value most pattern articles and features in the various magazines.
Having said all that, I have found NOTHING whatsoever of value in "Patterns in Java". I strongly recommend that you NOT buy this book. All of the patterns presented in "Patterns in Java" are covered better elsewhere. And if you are new to design patterns, "Patterns in Java" will only serve to misguide you.
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Patterns in Java: A Catalog of Reusable Design Patterns Illustrated with UML, 2nd Edition, Volume 1
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