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Patton


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Product Details

  • Actors: George C. Scott, Karl Malden, Stephen Young, Michael Strong, Carey Loftin
  • Directors: Franklin J. Schaffner
  • Writers: Edmund H. North, Francis Ford Coppola, Ladislas Farago, Omar N. Bradley
  • Producers: Frank Caffey, Frank McCarthy
  • Format: Anamorphic, Closed-captioned, Color, Dolby, THX, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround), English (Dolby Digital 5.1), French (Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo)
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Rated: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
  • Studio: Fox Home Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: May 15, 2001
  • Run Time: 172 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,604 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6305622930
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #128,568 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Patton" on IMDb

Special Features

  • Making-of documentary
  • Audio essay on the historical Patton Speech

Editorial Reviews

Additional Features

DVD extras include a 50-minute documentary entitled A Tribute to Franklin J. Schaffner. Originally produced in 1997 for the Patton laserdisc release, the documentary covers the elementary background of the film, including many stills from the production. Schaffner (who died in 1989) and George C. Scott (who died in 1999) are heard only in interviews recorded for the film's 1970 release. The only new interviews are from less vital players: production head Richard D. Zanuck, cinematographer Fred Koenekamp, and composer Jerry Goldsmith. The absence of retrospective views from Scott and cowriter Francis Ford Coppola is unfortunate. The audio essay is not by a filmmaker, but Charles M. Province, the founder and president of the George S. Patton Jr. museum. His background on the man is impressive, but one misses a filmmaker's touch to the essay, or even the recollections of Scott himself. The high point of the documentary discusses the arguments over the legendary opening sequence. The short ends with a huge misstep--letting Oliver Stone go off on one of his tirades about President Nixon and the influence that Patton had on the Vietnam War. Even if Stone's observations are relevant, his assertions about George C. Scott are totally inappropriate. The DVD also contains an isolated track of Goldsmith's influential score. --Doug Thomas

Customer Reviews

One of the best WWII movies ever made.
A. Greene
George C. Scott and Karl Malden give excellent performances in their roles as Patton and Bradley.
Jeffrey T. Munson
No other World War II general had the personality of Patton.
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

440 of 481 people found the following review helpful By B. D. Pentecost on June 24, 2011
Format: Blu-ray
Very first thing! There is only one version of Patton on Blu-Ray you should get if you want a proper transfer. Follow this link if you're not already on the correct product: Patton [Blu-ray]

If you're not sure you're linked on the correct one, it's the one with a full upper torso shot of Mr. Scott with the American flag hanging behind him. That's the remastered version. All versions with half his face off to the right with a gray/white background are the older, waxy transfer.

Second thing. To those who waited with me for the remaster, all I can say is WOW! It looks beautiful. Detail is strong and the image is once again alive. You can find comparison screen shots of the two version over at blu-ray.com. Their review of the remaster also explains their error in giving such high marks to the first blu-ray pressing of the film.

Only read on if you're either bored or don't fully know what the deal is with the two different versions.

Now that Amazon has combined all Patton reviews to be displayed on all versions of the film, I will sum up my original review of the 40th Anniversary Digi-Book Blu-Ray Edition to encompass a more, `in general' tone. To those wondering why so many people found my review helpful, it was because I researched and found important information about that particular release and felt a duty to inform all future Patton Blu-Ray purchasers that the 40th Anniversary, Digi-Book edition was in fact the same, horrible, DNR mess that had been available on Blu-Ray for a few years prior, just in new packaging.
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186 of 201 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on May 29, 2001
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
"Patton" offers one of the great marriages of actor and role with George C. Scott's riveting portrayal of the notorious American tank commander. As a film biography "Patton" forgoes the rise of the celebrated general and merely hints at his ironic death because of injuries suffered in a traffic accident, focuses entirely on his military career commanding troops in North Africa, Sicily and France during World War II. The strength of the script by Francis Ford Coppola and Edmund H. North, as well as of Scott's performance, is that the paradoxes of Patton are completely embraced. Not even Patton's loyal cadre of staff officers can keep him from shooting off his mouth every time there are reporters around, but then neither German Field Marshall Rommel or English Field Marshall Montgomery can beat him on the battlefield. Karl Malden's performance as General Omar Bradley is just as solid as Scott's, presenting a man whose personality is the complete antithesis of Patton. Viewers find themselves identifying with the German captain who is the intelligence expert on Patton and arguably the only person in the film who really understands or respects the American general. But the more I watch "Patton," the more I am very impressed with the battle sequences of director Franklin J. Schaffner ("Planet of the Apes," "Pappillon"), which were staged live and full-scale without special effects of miniatures. Schaffner provides not just the large spectacle of a desert tank battle, but smaller and equally memorable moments, such as a soldier falling dead in the snow. "Patton" deserved its Oscars.Read more ›
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62 of 68 people found the following review helpful By Barron Laycock HALL OF FAME on July 11, 2000
Format: DVD
When this movie was released, it was almost immediately recognized as one of the finest, most accurate and most sensational biographies ever filmed. The unique integration in "Patton" of such fine acting, such a wonderful script, and the filming itself combined to make this a gorgeous film to watch, be entertained with, and also learn from in terms of its historical value as an absolutely superb depiction of a most controversial man and his times. All that said, this is a movie best enjoyed with the kind of visual clarity, terrific cinematography, and matchless Technicolor it offers by way of DVD technology.
George C. Scott gives the performance of a lifetime as the ego-drive, brilliant, and iconoclastic Patton, marvel of the U.S Army, a man the Germans are convinced is far and away the single best General the Allies have, and they watch him convinced he is the only logical centerpiece for American plans for the impending invasion of Europe. Of course, they didn't understand the politics of the day, or the degree to which Patton was his own worst enemy. Yet the progress of the story on the screen convinces the viewer of the accuracy of the German command's judgments of him; he is at once bold, brilliant, and innovative, willing to improvise as he goes along to seize the opportunity of a given moment, attempting to grab hold of the ever-present chaos of the situation to transform it into an asset he can employ to gain advantage and win the engagement.
Such men as Patton (and MacArthur and others) are uniquely suited for war; they do not ordinarily fare well or survive with much public acclaim during less extreme and bloodcurdling times.
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