Buy Used
$2.63
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Item in good condition and ready to ship!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Patton's Ghost Corps Paperback – February 8, 2000


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$2.64 $2.63
Best%20Books%20of%202014

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Take an Extra 30% Off Any Book: Use promo code HOLIDAY30 at checkout to get an extra 30% off any book for a limited time. Excludes Kindle eBooks and Audible Audiobooks. Restrictions apply. Learn more.


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Presidio Press; New Edition edition (February 8, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0891417087
  • ISBN-13: 978-0891417088
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.6 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.7 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,415,204 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

YA-One of the little-known battles of World War II was General George S. Patton's attack on the German Siegfried Line in January and February of 1945. Because it occurred at the time of the massive effort by the American and British forces to destroy the last major German counteroffensive in what has come to be known as the Battle of the Bulge, this campaign is all but forgotten except by those who were there. Fought in subzero temperatures and often in blinding snowstorms, the campaign was daunting and the courage displayed by the soldiers certainly equaled that of their comrades in the Bulge. Prefer uses numerous interviews, official histories, and after-action reports to bring alive the numerous firefights and bloody assaults that marked the campaign, while detailed maps make it easy for readers to follow the ebb and flow of the action. This book will appeal most to history buffs and it will fill a gap in World War II collections.
Robert Burnham, R. E. Lee High School, Springfield,
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By kevinh@Cowles.com on March 19, 1999
Format: Hardcover
When the German Army launched its counteroffensive against the Allies in the Battle of the Bulge, Lieutenant General George S. Patton turned two of his three corps north to pierce the attack, leaving one corps, the XX, to hold an area previously held by three. But the XX Corps didn't defend, it attacked. Despite harsh weather, depleted strength and stiff German resistance, the XX Corps achieved remarkable success in the lesser known battles of the Saar-Mosell Triangle and the Saar Campaign. The story of the XX Corps in these campaigns is really the story of the 94th Infantry Division which attacked and fought off counterattacks by veteran German units until, assisted by the 10th Armored Division, they captured Trier, a key city to Germany's defenses. Nathan N. Prefer's Patton's Ghost Corps does an excellent job of following the action of these forgotten battles. Using archive records, interviews and other unpublished sources, Prefer fleshes out the less glamorous work of the Third Army and the German forces. In the process, he gives a clear picture of what the fight into Germany was like for the American infantryman. The XX Corps, commanded by Major General Walton Walker, earned the name 'Ghost Corps' because it moved so fast and so often, the Germans couldn't keep track of it. The 94th Division under Major General Harry J. Maloy, did Walker's bidding as it kept pressure on the German's opposing them. The book is at its best describing platoon-level action. Prefer paints well the scenes of wounded soldiers lying in an inch of freezing water on the floors of captured bunkers; men who actually feel lucky they are not in the trenches where the chances of death are greater.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By SirSwindon on April 13, 1999
Format: Hardcover
The author's stated reasons for adding to the plethora of existing accounts of World War II battles and battlefield units was twofold. First, Nathan Prefer felt too much had been written about the highly publicized engagements "where the might of the Allied, usually American, forces overwhelmed a stubborn defense or defeated a massive counterattack". He wanted to present an account of a battle "where American soldiers fought on relatively equal terms with their opponents and prevailed". His treatise therefore provides a round by round analysis of one such face to face fight - the Saar-Moselle Triangle campaign (January 13th to March 24th, 1945). (Prefer actually combined two campaigns into one: The Saar-Moselle Triangle [January 13th to February 23rd] and the Saar-Palatine Triangle [February 24th to March 25th]).
Eisenhower in his "Crusade in Europe" devoted just two lines to the Saar-Moselle Triangle: "The XX Corps, under General Walker, eliminated resistance in the Saar-Moselle triangle by February 23, and a bridge-head was established over the Saar. The Siegfried defenses were penetrated and Trier was captured March 2". Although Eisenhower acknowledges the outstanding qualities of the individual American soldier, his book addresses the "big picture" and wasn't about to present the fire-and-movement tactics of platoon, company and battalion size units - a necessary element of face to face combat. Prefer however needed these detailed accounts to make his point about a fight "on equal terms".
The second reason Prefer wrote "Patton's Ghost Corps" was to honor the men of the XX Corps, especially the 94th Infantry Division and the many other units which took part in the engagement.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
My father was with the 94th Division and this opened up an entire new chapter in my understanding of what he did in WWII. For most of the children of this division, there was little discussion with our fathers about their experiences. Now we know why. I'm grateful for the detail of the activities and it was relatively easy to pinpoint where his platoon was during most of the action,
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By a good reader on August 17, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Unknown history of George Patton and his men; a great leader with many dedicated followers in the military.Highly recommend this book to WW2 followers
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again