Qty:1
  • List Price: $34.00
  • Save: $10.72 (32%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Some marks on the back cover. Name written on title page. Good readable copy. Worn edges and covers and may have small creases. Otherwise item is in good condition. Your satisfaction is guaranteed!
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $4.79
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Paul and Palestinian Judaism: A Comparison of Patterns of Religion Paperback – June 1, 1977


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$23.28
$20.53 $14.99
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"


Frequently Bought Together

Paul and Palestinian Judaism: A Comparison of Patterns of Religion + Paul, the Law, and the Jewish People + Jesus and Judaism
Price for all three: $60.32

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 627 pages
  • Publisher: Fortress Press; 1st Paperback Edition edition (June 1, 1977)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0800618998
  • ISBN-13: 978-0800618995
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #85,414 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
2
3 star
3
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 9 customer reviews
Sanders is one of the best in his field.
Neal J. Giacomelli
Even though he rightly points out that ST/Rabbinic Judaism is not pelagian or advocates a legalist God, the religion he paints is more semi-pelagian or "Romish."
theologicalresearcher
Obedience does not earn but maintains ones covenant status.
Jordan B. Cooper

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

46 of 49 people found the following review helpful By Charles E. Meadows on November 18, 2005
Format: Paperback
This was THE book that kicked off the "New Perspective" on Paul. Actually the book is mostly about Judaism. Sander's primary point is that Judaism was NOT a legalistic works-for-salvation religion. His principal axe to grind is with Ferdinand Weber and Emil Schurer, both of whom put out books on Judaism in the early 1900s or so.

His treatment of Paul is scant but potent. He sees Paul arguing that ritual works of the law (circumcision and food laws) must not be foisted on Gentile Christians -and NOT arguing that salvation is by faith and not works.

In truth this book is really rather dry - and the average theology student will get more out of reading N.T. Wright or James D.G. Dunn, who discuss Sanders extensively, critiquing and fleshing out his positions.

But if you are a Pauline student you may simply want a copy on yout shelf!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
38 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Seth Aaron Lowry on March 14, 2003
Format: Paperback
EP Sanders delivers a memorable and convincing book on the subject of traditional Palestinian Judaism and Pauline theology. The major thrust of this book revolves around the idea that Judaism was not a works-righteousness legalistic religion which many 20th century scholars have attempted to prove; Instead, Sanders argues that traditional Judaism is a covenant religion where one maintains his status within the elect group through his piety and obedience.
To bolster and support his argument Sanders relies on textual support from Rabbinical sources, Qumran literature, and several apocryphal texts. Sanders argues that Jews believed their obedience did not earn their salvation but maintained their status within the covenant group. In other words, obedience was the condition and not the cause of salvation. This covenantal nomism as Sanders dubs it makes for an interesting argument and deconstructs the idea that Judaism is a works-righteousness religion.
Although Sanders' treatment of Paul leaves something to be desired, he does devote some serious time to reworking and understanding Paul's beliefs. Sanders sees many similarities between Paul and traditional Judaism, but also many huge differences that separate the two camps. According to Sanders, Paul believes that the only righteousness that matters comes from Jesus. Paul doesn't believe that the law cannot produce righteousness, but that the righteousness it produces isn't adequate. Paul's soteriology is extremely Christocentric and because of this the law has become irrelavant.
Also striking is Sanders' belief that Paul argued for a participatory function in Christ's death and resurrection. Sanders sees more than just an expiatory or forensic meaning in Paul's theological language.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Jordan B. Cooper on October 18, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If anything is to be said about this volume, its impact has changed Pauline scholarship until the present time. Many distinguish between pre-Sanders and post-Sanders Pauline scholarship. This was in many ways the begining of the movement now known as the "new perspective on Paul." Most of this volume is an evaluation of second temple Judaism. Sanders believes that in the second temple period there was a united pattern of religion. This falls into the rubric of soteriology. This pattern of religion Sanders calls Covenantal Nomism. This idea is that those in the covenant with Israel are in the covenant by grace, and they remain in by obedience to the law, however, not in such a way as to say salvation is earned. Obedience does not earn but maintains ones covenant status. Sanders fights against the idea that Jewish soteriology was simply a "weighing of the scales" where one's merits and demerits were weighed against one another. This idea was popularized by Weber and despite the fact that several Jewish scholars have fought against it, it was universally accepted. Sanders certainly has valid criticisms of previous second temple scholarships, however, he overreacts. Rather than seeing Judaism as a religion of works, Sanders sees Judaism as a religion of grace. When looking at the evidence from this period however, neither picture is accurate. There is a much greater diversity of opinions in second temple literature than either position will admit. For example, Josephus, who seems to be entirely ignored in this volume does not talk in terms of national covenant. Also, Philo talks in very different categories. Books like IV Ezra (which Sanders admits) and II Enoch do portray a type of legalism.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Mark Horne on July 17, 2003
Format: Paperback
Sanders has written a big book with lots of details. Obviously, there is still a lot of research and discussion to be done to come up with an accurate description of the patterns of religion exhibited by each form of Judaism. But at a general level, I though his case was more-or-less convincing.
Evangelicals who pick this up to read for the first time will be amazed at how little is said about Martin Luther or about traditional Protestant dogma. Sanders is aiming for specific historians of rabbinical thought. These men were not from the reformation but from liberal Protestantism, as far as I can tell from Sanders footnotes. The impression gathered from his book indicates that these people would have no real commitment to the "particularity" of the Christian religion--specifically the claim that Jesus' death and resurrection really happened in space/time history and that they even constituted the liberation of the world from sin, guilt, and death. Instead, Christianity was reduced to an abstract confidence in the benevolence of God and his willingness to forgive. To explain the divide between Christianity and Judaism, then, required that the latter be understood as an abstract need to earn God's favor by being good enough.
According to Sanders the Rabbis were massively misunderstood, even to the point of claiming that they had a doctrine of "a treasury of merits" by which people could be forgiven because of past works of superogation done by the fathers. Obviously the most superstitious forms of Medieval Roman Catholic theology were being imposed on these people.
Of course, this hardly means that the Rabbis were good Protestants in how Sanders claims they formulated their doctrine.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?