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Paying for College Without Going Broke, 2012 Edition (College Admissions Guides) Paperback – October 25, 2011

ISBN-13: 978-0375427411 ISBN-10: 0375427414 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Series: College Admissions Guides
  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Princeton Review; 1 edition (October 25, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0375427414
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375427411
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 7.8 x 10.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #659,005 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Inside Flap

?The most complete and up-to-date book I?ve seen on loans,grants, and tax strategies for parents of college-bound children.?
? Terry Savage, Chicago Sun-Times

? Paying for College could accurately be titled ?Everything the College Financial Aid Officers Won?t Tell, and Everything You Never Thought to Ask.??
? New York Daily News

Insider Strategies for Maximizing Financial Aid and Minimizing College Costs

? Plan ahead to improve your chance of receiving financial aid
? Calculate your aid eligibility before you apply to colleges
? Complete the financial aid forms (including the 2004?2005 FAFSA and the 2004?2005 CSS PROFILE)
? Negotiate with the financial aid office
? Learn about educational tax breaks
? Master special circumstances if you?re a single parent or an independent student

Kalman A. Chany is the founder and president of Campus Consultants in New York. For 21 years he has helped thousands of clients maximize the amount of financial aid they receive. He has shared his advice on Good Morning America, NBC Nightly News, CNN, NPR?s Talk of the Nation, and other prominent news programs.

The Princeton Review
With the fastest growing test-preparation company and school information website in the country, The Princeton Review helps prepare more than two million students each year for college, grad school, professional licensing exams, and successful careers. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Kal Chany is the founder and president of Campus Consultants, an independent New York-based firm that has helped thousands of families get financial aid since 1984. He has authored articles on college funding for Parade and other publications, and has appeared on ABC's Good Morning America, CBS's Evening News, CNN's Your Money, and NPR's "Talk of the Nation," among other prominent shows.

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Customer Reviews

Too time consuming.
Diane Lebovitz
Chany explains upfront that the most financial aid goes not to the "neediest" but to those who best understand the financial aid process.
Eric Tyson
As a side note, I had a 2012 version of this book.
W. Chilson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Carol M. on January 2, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
After borrowing the 2009 version from the library, I purchased this 2012 edition. I am impressed with the book's emphasis on planning ahead. It is easy to read, suggestions are plentiful and I highly recommend it for parents with children in middle school or just starting high school. My first takeaway from the book was learning about the first base income year which starts when the child is midway through their junior year of high school. Second was learning how to improve the chances of getting financial aid by planning ahead. Note that this book is revised and updated each year to stay current. There's also a website to find the most recent changes in advice to families.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Eric Tyson on December 16, 2008
Format: Paperback
Chany explains upfront that the most financial aid goes not to the "neediest" but to those who best understand the financial aid process. This happens for many reasons including the many financial aid loopholes. Structuring your finances to maximize aid awarded to your children entering and in college is legal and ethical says Chany. He argues that just as making decisions to legally minimize taxes is ethical, so too is maximizing aid so long as you tell the truth in aid applications.

Colleges and their financial aid officers don't explain the often mysterious process and formulas by which financial aid awards are determined. Chany has filled this void in his comprehensive book.

Chany is one of a handful of nationally recognized experts on how the college financial aid process works and what you can do to maximize your child's aid. His book, which has been in print since the early 1990s, is updated annually. Chany also discusses the college selection process, how state aid works, and he walks the reader through how to complete all the major aid forms.

For a more detailed summary of this book, please see my website ([...])

- Eric Tyson
Best-selling author of Personal Finance for Dummies
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By wabeamyngenque on January 18, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A relative told me about this book. So glad that I bought it. It will really help with filling out the FAFSA form,figuring out exactly how much it's all going to cost and where to look for alternative funding. The part about your starting to plan early will help with my other much younger child. If you child is a sophomore you need to be reading this - don't wait like I did. I waited way too long to start planning. Wished I would have bought this book about a year ago. I could have saved myself some headaches on the base income for the FAFSA. Now at least we have suggestions on how to adjust things to take advantage of all this book has to offer. Even took it to my accountant to discuss my taxes. He is getting a copy of the book too. Wish we would have had stuff like this when I was in high school. It would certainly have helped my parents out alot. It has updates every year because things are changing so fast so be prepared to get the most up to date version that is out. Good stuff, thanks so much author!!!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Roger Gros on November 27, 2013
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Not much I didn't already know. Too much focus on low income folks and not enough advice for the middle class.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Stephanie Collins on March 30, 2009
Format: Paperback
I'm a recent college grad that paid for college, and completed the financial aid process, on my own. I was reading this book specifically to review it, and was actually a little depressed. Not because the book is bad (that's far from true), but because I saw all the places where I could have done things differently, and gotten more money for school (and thus decreased the huge debt load that I'm now paying off).

I disagree with the reviewer that said there isn't much here for the average parent or child - I think there's more than plenty here for the average college applicant's family. The problem is that a lot of it has to be taken into account a few years before the student starts college. If you take "average" to mean "families that put off thinking about college until the last minute," then yes, there's less here for those families than forward-thinking ones. But there's even some information procrastinators can use.

All-in-all, I feel that the book breaks down the process really well, and that there's at least a little something for everyone: from parents of newborns looking for long-term planning, to current students looking to beef up their aid package next year.

My criticism of the book is this: it's very much written for parents. There's very little in it targeted at students directly. Students who are living through my situation, and doing it all on their own, may come away from this book thinking there is very little they can do on their own to increase their aid. That's not true - the book just requires a lot of "translating" for students in this situation.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By W. Chilson on January 2, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read this book from cover to cover. It was very informative and is well worth the price. After some number crunching, I doubt that the information would actually save me any money, but it was still worth it for the information.
As a side note, I had a 2012 version of this book. There were very few changes between the versions and if I had know that they were that similar, I would not have purchased the newer version.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Donna Ohanian on September 2, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This was by far, the best book I have seen regarding how the Financial Aid process works. I bought this before 2005 when my daughter was going to UConn. It still applies this year, 2012 when my son starts college. Key chapter - the one that tells you to get your AGI, adjusted gross income, below $ 50,000. That is key. Works like a charm. Get that number low by creating a few small businesses. Sell stuff on craigslist or ebay? That's your small business. Write kids books? Sell Avon? Keep those receipts, save that gas station charge. Those IRS Schedule C's can bring your AGI just a few thousand down to where you need it to be. And yes. Your child will suddenly get Pell grants, subsidized loans, etc. I'm not saying cheat. I'm saying be smart, do what it takes for a few years for your income to be low and it will help your college finances. Schedule A deductions do not work the same way. Scholarships are good, but for every 30 your child fills out, they may get 3 or 4. And they are time consuming from finding them, to writing essays, to getting whatever they want into the application. College kids don't always have time to apply. So, I highly recommend this book to give you a clue into how the whole financial aid process works. I hope a new edition will encourage kids not to leave school with $ 50,000 or more in debt. Find a cheaper school!
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