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Peace Child: An Unforgettable Story of Primitive Jungle Treachery in the 20th Century Paperback – August 8, 2005


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Regal; 4 edition (August 8, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0830737847
  • ISBN-13: 978-0830737840
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.1 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (80 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #26,844 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

DON RICHARDSON, author of Secrets of the Koran, Lords of the Earth and Eternity in Their Hearts, has been studying the Muslim world for more than 30 years. He and his wife, Carol, spent 15 years among the Sawi, a Stone Age tribe of Irian Jaya. Don designed an alphabet suited to the Sawi language, authored 19 primers, taught the tribesmen to read in their native tongue and translated the entire New Testament. More than half of the Sawi accepted Jesus Christ as their Lord and Savior. Since 1977, Don has served as ambassador-at-large for World Team, a mission organization. Don holds an honorary doctorate of literature from Biola University in La Mirada, California, is an ordained pastor and speaks at more than 40 church conferences each year.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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See all 80 customer reviews
I read it many years ago and gave this copy as a gift.
ANN A. WOOD
This amazing story of Don and Carol Richardson and their courageous ministry to the Sawi tribe is intriguing and compelling and a hard book to put down.
jjennings
As hard as it is to imagine such treachery and disregard for human life, seeing how God's love can transform hearts is even more unimaginable.
Garrett

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Robert Swaney on May 12, 2006
Format: Paperback
This is an amazing story of Don and Carol Richardson going into an area inhabited by people who were cannibals and how they found things in that tribe's culture that allowed them to communicate the Gospel of Jesus Christ so effectively that many became Christians. It also shows that missionaries don't need to introduce western culture to indigenous peoples but do better when merely giving them the Truth of Scripture and let the people themselves decide how that affects the way they live. This is one of the best books I have ever read and I'm giving it to my friends.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By M. Sellers on April 12, 2006
Format: Paperback
I just finished reading Peace Child by Don Richardson. Wow. What kind of faith must one have to be a missionary and to take a wife and seven month old son to a tribe of treacherous cannibals where no white man speaks the language? That's just what Don Richardson did. He and his wife Carol went to Irian Jaya (island north of Australia) in 1962 to witness to the Sawi people.

The book goes into detail about many of the concepts and customs of the people. One highly-prized ideal was the "fattening a friend for slaughter." It wasn't just enough to kill someone. The best and most highly-regarded way to murder was to first befriend a person (from another tribe or village) and get him to trust you fully. Then, after many months of friendship, the "friend" would be dramatically murdered, cooked, and eaten.

Richardson shares his frustration at trying to share the story of Jesus and His love with these people and at finding that they thought Judas was the one to be admired because of his deceitfulness. "...It seemed God had not troubled Himself to prepare the Sawi...for the coming of the gospel...The Sawis had no name for God. Nor even the concept of Him..." Disheartened and wondering if any man at any time had ever faced a communication barrier such as his, Richardson wondered what would happen. And then, he learned of the tradition of the Peace Child.

The story of the Sawi people and their conversion from paganism to Christianity and the story of the Richardsons and their faithful ministry is a fascinating and compelling read. The book would not be appropriate for younger readers (or as a read aloud for those listeners) as there as cannibalistic practices and killing are discussed in some detail. But, for a more mature reader (late middle school and above), Peace Child will make you marvel at God's hand even in the remotest corner of the world.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Wendy Smith on March 31, 2006
Format: Paperback
As a former missionary to Papua New Guinea, I have the utmost respect for the way Don and Carol Richardson sought to understand and link aspects of Sawi culture, in clearest terms, to the essence of Christianity. Whether we like it or not, the Sawi were destined to enter the modern world in one way or another, and the most likely scenario was that of exploitation. By the Grace of God, the Richardsons gently assisted them into that world, while encouraging them to retain their self-respect and sovereignty. I shudder to think what would have happened to these vulnerable people if they had been left to the mercies of organisations intent on helping themselves to the natural resources of their land, and to a government using harsh punitive measures to control them.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Michael J. Greiner on April 26, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Why you should read this book: The Christian publishing world doesn't sell near the percentage of mission books as other kinds of books. Though disappointing, it's not that surprising, as the mission field often seems far from our own experience. However, God's heart is to build His church continually, and in all places.

Richardson goes to those who have no gospel witness at all. He chronicles not only his trials but his amazing success --which came about in the oddest of ways. Great violence threatened to overtake the people he was working with. I won't say more, for to do so would be to spoil a great climax.

I didn't give this 5 stars because I felt the book moved rather slowly until the end. It is readable, but it would not be honest to call it a page-turner.

One caution after this. Richardson hints (and later writes a book stating explicitly) that every unreached culture has a "redemptive analogy" already built into it. The missionary task then, involves finding this redemptive analogy and using it to unlock the people's hearts. Although that seems to be the case in Peace Child, it is a stretch to say that God a)has provided a redemptive analogy in every culture and b)one must find it in order to maximize the power of the gospel message. The gospel is powerful by itself. One not need be anthropologist, nor an insightful sociologist, nor a brilliant detective, nor even a spiritually discerning half-wit to bring the Gospel in power. "Faith comes by hearing and hearing by the word of God." Mission work is good work and real work. If unique ways of illustrating the gospel are available, we must, by all means use them.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Donald A. Peck on July 4, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A powerful story of how a missionary was able to find the deep structure of primitive tribe and translate God's words into their language and culture so they could understand.
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Format: Paperback
To be called by God to a foreign country as a missionary of the Gospel is a privilege and an awesome undertaking. But to be called as a missionary to a culture that is virtually untouched by the modern world, has no written language, and is based on violence and treachery as a lifestyle is almost unimaginable. This is exactly the kind of people that Don and Carol Richardson, with their eight-month old son, went to live among for the purpose of bringing them Christ. Richardson's book, Peace Child, describes their introduction to and ministry among the Sawi people of New Guinea. After reading Richardson's account of his experience among the tribal people in Irian Jaya, I can only say that surely God takes great care and consideration when He hand-picks His servants to carry out such an overwhelming task.

Don Richardson explains that as a fairly new believer at age twenty, he felt a strong urgency deep inside from the Lord to serve Him as a missionary; the only question for him was, Where? One day in 1955, as a student at Prairie Bible Institute in Canada, he heard this from a representative of Regions Beyond Missionary Union:

"[You will find yourself in] the midst of entire tribes that have never known any kind of governmental control, where people are a law unto themselves and where savagery is a way of life. You must learn to make yourself and your message understood in the medium of languages never before learned by any outsider...You will encounter customs and beliefs which will baffle you, but which must be understood if you are to succeed...You must prepare to endure loneliness, weariness and frustration with fortitude. Most of all, you must be prepared, in the strength of the Lord to do battle with the prince of darkness, who...
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