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Pearl Harbor Countdown: Admiral James O. Richardson Hardcover – June 25, 2008


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Pearl Harbor Countdown: Admiral James O. Richardson + On the Treadmill to Pearl Harbor: The Memoirs of Admiral James O. Richardson
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 544 pages
  • Publisher: Pelican Publishing; First edition (June 25, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1589805925
  • ISBN-13: 978-1589805927
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 1.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,847,076 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

A biography of the first naval officer to lose his command over Pearl Harbor strategy prior to World War II.

From the Inside Flap

In 1940, the U.S. naval fleet was stationed at Pearl Harbor, a strategic and political move intended to discourage Japanese aggression. Admiral James O. Richardson, the commander in chief of the entire U.S. fleet, ardently opposed this decision. Richardson was truly devoted to the fleet, playing a central role in developing and implementing War Plan Orange, the military strategies, exercises, and plans launched in 1924 designed to check Japan in the Pacific. From his intense investment in these exercises, it became clear to him that the fleet should not remain at Pearl Harbor. The fleet was not prepared, the country was vulnerable, and the facilities available in Hawaii were less than sufficient to provide training for the sailors and protection for the United States. Living out his life-long commitment to the U.S. fleet, Richardson sacrificed his career to make certain that the navy provided the United States her first line of defense. Going up against the chief of naval operations, Harold Stark; the secretary of the navy, Frank Knox; and not to mention the president of the United States, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Richardson repeatedly tried to convey to them the navy's unpreparedness and vulnerability in the Pacific. Richardson's training, expertise, and experience led him to believe that a Japanese attack on the U.S. fleet was not only possible, it was inevitable. After Richardson repeatedly criticized the executive decision to station the fleet in Hawaii, he was relieved of his command. When the Japanese attacked on December 7, 1941, it became painfully obvious that Admiral Richardson's fears were not only well founded, but that he had been right all along. Author Skipper Steely masterfully crafts an insightful and convincing biography of this overlooked naval hero. Offering a fresh perspective on what led to the catastrophic and infamous 1941 Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor, along with a detailed treatment of the historical investigations regarding the attack throughout the 1950s and 1960s, Pearl Harbor Countdown proves indispensable reading for anyone interested in World War II in the Pacific. [ Back flap ] Skipper Steely has been writing and editing books for more than twenty years. He attended East Texas State University and graduated from there in 1968. After serving in the United States Air Force as an information and recruitment officer, Steely began his career in the newspaper industry as a writer and an editor. Since 1990, Steely has worked as a full-time writer. He lives in Paris, Texas.

More About the Author

Contact Steely at: wrightpress@suddenlink.net

A newspaper writer, editor and owner for most of his life, Skipper Steely has been writing, editing, producing and marketing books since 1980. Periodically he produces magazine articles.

Steely graduated from Paris High School in 1964, from East Texas State University with a B.S. in Business/Journalism in 1968 and a M.S. in Journalism/Business in 1970. After a stint with the United States Air Force as an information and recruitment officer, Steely spent the next eight years in the newspaper business, and a short time as a division director in a state agency.

In 1980 Steely began to write and publish books, as well as market books published by others under the name of Wright Press. In 1990 he began to write full-time and has completed several manuscripts on fiction, non-fiction, and biography. The bulk of his work is on history, but books on sports and novels of adventure have also come from his keyboard.

Some Completed Work:

Articles:
Paris News
Lamar County Echo
Dallas Times Herald
Texas East Times
Commerce Citizen
Wolfe City Sun
Cooper Review
East Texas Historical Journal

Books:
Six Months From Tennessee-Hardback
The Raymond Berry Years-Hardback
Charles DeMorse: Father of Texas Journalism (edited-Hardback
SANTA ANNA: Prisoner Of War In Texas (edited)-Hardback
First United Church of Paris (co-wrote, edited)-Hardback
PEARL HARBOR COUNTDOWN: Story of Admiral James O. Richardson-Hardback
Forty Seven Years-Kindle
Red River Pioneers (edited-Kindle
Civil War In The Redlands-Kindle
Kidnapping Of The President--fiction on Nook
The Admirals of 1940:Why Stay at Pearl?-Kindle & Nook
Paris, Texas Lynchings-Kindle
John Chisum-Kindle
Davey Crockett-Kindle
Eddie Robinson-Kindle

Manuscripts:
W.P. Richardson in Russia
Paris, Texas Cotton Compress
John J. Culbertson
Secession Vote By Lamar County, Texas
Flavius Josephus Fisher: Artist
George W. Wright Memoirs (edited)
Northeast Texas Pioneers (edited)
William Henry Huddle:Texas Capitol Painter

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

32 of 33 people found the following review helpful By David M. Dougherty VINE VOICE on July 9, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Although this book is not a great book in that it does not include all aspects of the Pearl Harbor story, it does cover new and overlooked ground that adds another dimension to the American command and political scene at the time. The book centers on the life of Admiral James Otto Richardson, a potential candidate for the office given to Admiral King before Pearl Harbor and the commander of the Pacific Fleet immediately before Admiral Kimmel. It is actually very much a biography of Richardson, but the truly interesting portion, and the author's area of concentration, is Richardson's involvement with the move to Pearl Harbor by the US Pacific Fleet and his actions and knowledge of the political and command situations that cast light on the Pearl Harbor attack.

Richardson was involved in the creation and updating of War Plan Orange, specifically the Rainbow series of Rainbow One, Two (never issued) and Three. At no time did Richardson feel the Rainbow plans were realistic -- a serious indictment of American civilian and military leadership and obviously something that could not be told to the American public. Nevertheless, Richardson tended to blame Congress for this situation due to the lack of funding for the Navy rather than the President. (So what else is new -- Congress has never possessed much moral courage or foresight.)

Richardson vehemently opposed the move of the Pacific Fleet to Pearl Harbor in 1940 due to many well-founded factors (including its lack of training and supply facilities and unnecessary exposure), but Roosevelt wanted to move the fleet to Hawaii as an aggressive move towards the Central Pacific to place pressure on Japan. When the move became permanent Richardson opposed Roosevelt's edict in an overly frank manner.
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