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Pecos Bill Paperback – September 18, 1992


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Pecos Bill + Paul Bunyan (Reading rainbow book) + Mike Fink
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: 1 - 3
  • Paperback: 48 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins; Reprint edition (September 18, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0688099246
  • ISBN-13: 978-0688099244
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 0.1 x 11 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #330,717 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

A rootin'-tootin' hero of "the rugged pioneer days" comes to glorious life in Kellogg's characteristically antic prose and pictures. Ages 5-up.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

PreS Up The anecdotes associated with Texas' fabled cowboy hero burst from the pages in rapid succession, Kellogg's robust illustrations enlarging and enriching the choppy, energetic text that is seasoned with Texan expressions. In dramatizing Pecos Bill's life story, Kellogg also conveys a sense of place, of the rugged, expansive physical beauty of the American West in pioneer days. Yellow-oranges and blues dominate the scenes, in tones that range from dust-pale to midnight blue. Skillful framing and alternating of perspectives enhance readers' involvement: vast panoramas in which people are dwarfed by endless stretches of land and sky; double-page spreads cluttered with close-up action; breathtaking overviews, as of a tremendous herd of cattle, each steer made distinct, yet part of a near-monochromatic blend of hazy light and animal landscape. In contrast to these lavish illustrations are neatly-boxed illustrations that parallel the text, sometimes spilling from the frames when the action simply can't be contained. Kellogg's style is ideally suited to this tall taleantic, detailed, colorful, hyperbolic. Susan Powers, Berkeley Carroll Street Sch . , Brooklyn
Copyright 1986 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

With the same energy, humor and clarity found in his 50 books, David wows audiences at schools around the United States and beyond. David is an accomplished storyteller and a master at getting kids to think and have fun at the same time. His presentations lead children on entertaining and educational journeys that combine math, science, reading and writing. David also gives keynote presentations and workshops for educators at professional conferences.

Customer Reviews

I love all of these Steven Kellogg American folk tales.
P. Smith
This is such a fun story to read out loud to my grandchildren.
Terri on the Prairie
We bought this as a present for my nephew, who loved it!
4merryville

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Ann Azuma on July 1, 2001
Format: Paperback
This mild, but event-filled re-telling of the Pecos Bill story lacks the incorrigible air of tongue-in-cheek humour and bold-faced lies of the typical tall tale. However, and especially if your young`uns never heard a tall tale, the wonderful illustrations will partially make up for this. When we started to read this book, we thought those sweet-faced, round-eyed, snub-nosed cowboys looked a little familiar: this guy is the same feller who illustrated HOW MUCH IS A MILLION? which we like alot. My boys love the snake lasso, and we return many times to the fantastic "critter" that Bill wrassles into submission. But breaking-in "Widder-maker" is an let-down after that adventure, I am afraid. I recommend Adrien Stoutenburg`s AMERICAN TALL TALES for older children (9-12yrs) which has few illustrations but whose style is far better suited to the dramatic and poetic nature of the tall tale genre. My seven-year old loves to hear me read those aloud.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Teresa on March 24, 2002
Format: Paperback
A legend about a boy who falls out of his family wagon as they are crossing the country. He is forced to raise himself in the wide open west and learn how to protect his life.
This was an ok book from my point of view. The illustrations were amazing they really kept my attention. However, the writing was nothing too spectacular. The story of Pecos Bill is one of adventure and I just didn't feel like this version of the story captured the really adventure of the legend. This book sends the message of standing up for yourself and never giving up on your dream. I think it did a good job of getting the message across and my second graders knew what the message was as soon as a closed the book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By 4merryville on April 9, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I grew up reading Kellogg's books and loved everyone of them from Pinkerton to the Tall Tales. We bought this as a present for my nephew, who loved it! My kids are clamoring for their own copy. The pictures are funny and had my kids giggling with each turn of the page. This book is the perfect addition to your library or give as a gift!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Heather Nelson on March 20, 2012
Format: Paperback
This book is an amazing because it brings geography and history into a student's world without boring them. It is myth based but shows what Texas looked like a long time ago. It would be a great book to use to introduce Texas history to first or second grade students. The illustrations are unbelievable and will keep students excited and entertained the entire instructional time. This book does apply the Culture concept of the NCSS standard because it shows the culture of the time period in Texas and also how adaptations were made. Time, Continuity, and Change, also a NCSS standard, used in this book because it shows how historical events developed in Texas and how those events shape our world today. Even though it is told as a tall tale it still shows students what happened in Texas during the time period and what improvements were made.
This book while being cute is too myth based to show to students because it could confuse them. The books characters are similar to other books Kellogg has done so that takes away from its originality. The idea of teaching students about Texas history through a book that includes tall tales does not make sense. Students should be taught facts when learning history, and this book does not do this.
It is a fictional story of Pecos Bill that is told by Randy Rogers and the Sons of the Pioneers. It begins with an infant falling out of a covered wagon and discovered by wolves. He becomes one of their kind and grows up with survival skills then becomes a he-man of the American Desert. He discovers how to round up cattle and tame horses. He makes a friendship with a horse that rescues him. He then falls in love with a lady named Slue Foot Sue. Finally, he runs back into his family and ends up living in Texas where he started out to begin with.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on May 25, 2007
Format: Paperback
Pecos Bill is a good witten fantasy childrens book. Pecos and his family are moving and Pecos falls out of the wagon and raised by a pack of coyotes when he was young. Later he finds he is great at wrestling animals. Pecos finds a white stallion that is the fastest ever and helps heard the cattle so the town can do things without them in the way.

Pecos Bill takes place in Texas after he falls off the wagon. One thing I liked that the author did was make it a fast pace book and not run on. The problem was mainly that the texans were looking to get the cattle out of the way of their town. The best audience for this book are yong kids mostly boys. The author leaves the reading level basic and doesnt usse and confusing words. Steven Kellogg did a great job writing Pecos Bill
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Laurie J. Neverman on February 12, 2008
Format: Paperback
While the book is filled with huge illustrations, the edge has been taken off the story. Part of what made the Pecos Bill story appealing when I was a child was the danger involved and the rough and ready lifestyle. This is just too "white bread" - boring, bland, yawn inducing. They completely domesticated Widowmaker (his horse), referring to him as "Lightening" for the majority of the story. On the plus side, the story retains a few more elements than Kellogg's abyssmal rendering of Paul Bunyan.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By todd brown on February 20, 2012
Format: Paperback
This is the best Pecos Bill book I have ever read. A must have for any kid fascinated by the tales of the Wild West.
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