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Pedagogy of the Bible: An Analysis and Proposal
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on March 23, 2015
has the historical critical method reach the end of its usefulness in the training of clergy. dale martin has surveyed seminaries and schools of theology and has concluded that the exclusive use of the historical critical methods as the only means of analyzing the bible has reached a dead end. he suggest that we use other methods of exegesis that would assist clergy in their role of preaching the good news and as pastoral counselors.
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on April 26, 2013
This book has an interesting take on contemporary biblical scholarship and how it is being taught in the major theological schools. It does have the advantage of not just offering a critique but providing an alternative to what is currently being done.
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on September 22, 2014
I truly enjoyed reading Pedagogy of the Bible. It has showed me to not only read the Bible through the lens historical critcism but to look at how early readers and theologians read and interpreted the Bible and how to employ some of those same practices into my reading and understanding. Great book and I highly recommend it!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on May 25, 2013
Dale Martin asks important questions about how we bring religious tradition into the Information Economy. He uses classical questions about the role of exegesis and eisegesis, historical and cultural "Truth" analysis, and retains an explicit and inclusive Christian focus. This in itself is surprising in that Professor Martin, teaching in Religious Studies at Yale, is not professionally constrained to these more traditional perspectives that might be more expected from a person with his credentials teaching in a seminary, or in a Christian college. As he moves from a comprehensive analysis, that sweeps in metaphysical philosophy as well as theology of scripture and....theology, he moves toward the contemporary question of how we might approach training today's generation of teachers/mentors for our theological, scriptural, and religious future, our young adults, and their children.

As a species, we are still asking the same metaphysical and theological questions that have plagued us throughout our linguistic history. In the Information Age, with unprecedented access to global information and thought systems, there is a cultural shift away from concerns with orthodoxy and the constraint of confining the word "scripture," and the theological concepts that have emerged out of sectarian scripture, to the Bible. What is intriguing about listening in on what sometimes reads like an internal conversation with himself, is that D. B. Martin appreciates the value of what he might call "liberal Christianity." These are values that are not only professional, but personal. For most anyone else, that is the end of the questioning story. However, in "Pedagogy of the Bible," Martin encourages us to consider the further possibility that the broadening value of Christian logos does not exclude the continuing value of more conservative approaches to scripture and theology. That is, it is the conversation between tradition as "Christian Received View" and tradition as the emerging voice of God's truth in the world that will ideally pervade culture, and invade history in the making.

Professor Martin is currently wrestling with the Proposal presented here as he moves to a more theologically based demonstration of what we might say about Christianity that speaks as inclusively as possible to the richly diverse Christian Church of tomorrow. Based on "Pedagogy," Martin's continuing journey is definitely worth "Following", in the LinkedIn and Facebook, and more traditional meanings of that word.
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on April 2, 2015
relevant, well written
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7 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on May 14, 2009
Dale Martin writes passionately about theological education and the use of the Bible in classroom. This book is a welcome addition to my bookshelf and to my own research as well. Martin proposes that teaching of the Bible come back to premodern interpretation in which readers take the central stage. The Bible (texts) doesn't mean something clear to everybody. But it is the reader who decides the final meaning of the text. This does not mean that any meaning goes. Even historians choose a certain meaning in their interpretation. So if somebody says "the Bible says ..." it shouldn't be understood that the Bible says the only one thing. Therefore, all readings are subject to investigation and criticism. Actually, it is an irony that this important part of "reader" has not been given much attention. My hope is that all levels of readers faithfully and critically engage the Bible in their diversity of life contexts. In this way I believe that lively meaning of the text might be ever-coming back for us today. In fact, I share with Martin the same passion for theological education: Christ's Body in Corinth: The Politics of a Metaphor (Paul in Critical Contexts).
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