Peeper 1975 PG CC

Amazon Instant Video

Available in HD
(13) IMDb 5.8/10
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A detective is hired to locate a girl adopted 30 years earlier whose birth father wants to bequeath her his fortune.

Starring:
Michael Caine, Natalie Wood
Runtime:
1 hour, 27 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

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Product Details

Genres Mystery, Comedy
Director Peter Hyams
Starring Michael Caine, Natalie Wood
Supporting actors Kitty Winn, Michael Constantine, Thayer David, Timothy Carey, Liam Dunn, Don Calfa, Margo Winkler, Harvey J. Goldenberg, Dorothy Adams, Buffy Dee, Gary Combs, Robert Ito, Snag Werris, Paul Jabara, Liz Renay, Ken Johnson, Luke Andreas, Lester Fletcher
Studio 20th Century Fox
MPAA rating PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Rob on February 6, 2007
Format: DVD
I am a huge Michael Caine AND Natalie Wood fan since the Mid-Sixties and I have never heard of this movie til it came out on DVD. How could such an ideal movie match-up escape me? This looks on the outset that it could rival the chemistry of Gambit. Our stars do deliver: Caine is still slim and Harry Palmerish and Natalie is stunningly beautiful. No question they work great together. But the problem about this mystery is the plot: the scenes keep going by and I don't really know what is the point. Caine is trying to solve something about which lady is the missing twin, I think, and for what purpose, I'm not sure. I lay the blame at Hyam's feet. In his interview, he admits the film tested badly, but doesn't seem to know why. Obviously, audiences were too baffled by the murky plot to fully enjoy the Caine/Wood combo. Fans of either should watch this, but don't expect the cleverness of a Gambit.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By L. E. Cantrell VINE VOICE on April 7, 2007
Format: DVD
Every man has a wonderful idea that absolutely will not work. Judging by his track record, director Peter Hyams has had several.

As the film itself strongly implies and as the attached interviews with Hyams make explicit, "Peeper" was intended as a loving re-creation of a noir-ish hard-boiled detective film. The screenplay, originally titled "Fat Chance," was based on a Keith Laumer novel of the same name. It so happens that I have never come across that book, but I certainly know Laumer's work. He was a good, sound wordsmith. His business was telling fast-moving stories and he was good at it. I'd be willing to bet that the book version of "Fat Chance" was swift of foot, peppered with lean, mean dialogue and generally smarter than its pulpish bloodlines might suggest.

As I sit here typing these comments, I find myself coming around to believing that many of the same things might be said about the screenplay written for "Fat Chance." I can't speak about the book, but it is clear that the particular hard-boiled detective the screenwriter had in mind was Raymond Chandler's Philip Marlowe and the specific noir film he was channeling was "The Big Sleep." Marlowe's greatest film outing. Marlowe and "The Big Sleep" are gold standard stuff. Having chosen to be derivative, neither the screenwriter nor the director could have picked better models to rip off.

The intentions were good. The screenplay was sound. From that point, everything else went straight into the dumpster. The first appalling error was the tone chosen for the film: self-mocking and ironic. Self-mockery and irony are the very antitheses of film noir. Whatever a noir film may be, it is serious about it, deadly serious. As Edward G.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Brian on January 20, 2013
Format: DVD
Peter Hyams' noir homage/spoof 'Peeper' has been thoroughly-- and somewhat justifiably-- savaged by critics and the public since its largely ignored 1976 theatrical release. The first time I watched it several years ago, in fact-- though I found it mildly entertaining-- fancying myself a hardcore noir enthusiast, I got irritated with its shortcomings and ultimately was left unimpressed by its efforts to achieve either clever satire or classic-noir-era verity. Having revisited it recently, however, I'm more inclined to group it in with a handful of contemporaneous oddities (none of them too successful commercially) that aspired to the same ends-- namely 'Gumshoe,' 'Murder by Death,' 'The Cheap Detective,' and 'Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid,' as well as more serious offerings such as the '70s remakes of 'The Big Sleep' and 'Farewell, My Lovely'-- and now view 'Peeper' less testily than I once did. Yes, a British private dick in 1947 L.A. played by Harry Palmer-via-Michael Caine is strange and a little distracting. Yes, the lovely Natalie Wood makes rather a stiff and unconvincing femme fatale. Yes, the humor is corny. And, yes, the story is convoluted and lacks narrative/dramatic cohesion sufficient to create anything but artificial suspense. But all the above-mentioned movies have similar flaws and I think can be appreciated despite-- or perhaps because of-- those flaws, for what might pretentiously be called their 'mis-mise-en-scene': an endearing and honest, albeit wobbly, attempt to honor/re-create a bygone genre that then (fortyish years ago) certainly was not a big part of the filmgoing consciousness. Remember, before legendary flicks like 'The Big Sleep' and 'Maltese Falcon' and 'D.O.A.Read more ›
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By EddieLove on June 23, 2007
Format: DVD
There are some stylish production touches and the DVD looks good, but this is nearly unwatchable. Is it screwball or noir? The jokes fall flat and there's no real tension. Caine and Wood are okay, but everyone else is playing to the back row. (The climax's eerie foreshadowing of Wood's death doesn't exactly add to the enjoyment.)
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By lukas on September 13, 2010
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I love Michael Caine not that being said, I really enjoy the rythum of this movie cute with a little bit of spice.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on February 25, 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
With Michael Caine as a down-at-heels, in-over-his-head 1940s private eye, and Natalie Wood as a femme fatale, this film's problem isn't in casting. And any movie with character actors like Thayer David and Timothy Carey essaying the bad guys is worth watching for that alone. Additionally, Peter Hyams' direction is smooth and production values are top flight. What's needed is a much tighter script or at least one with a sharper satirical edge that doesn't drift off into slapstick every couple of scenes. What makes its failing all the more regrettable is the talent Hyams demonstrated just four years before directing and writing Goodnight, My Love, a TV movie that was an extraordinary salute to Forties private eyedom. It had Richard Boone and Michael Dunne as two sleuths involved in a case that might have amused Raymond Chandler. And when will somebody make this little masterpiece available on DVD?
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