Buy New
$58.50
Qty:1
  • List Price: $65.00
  • Save: $6.50 (10%)
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Pens and Needles: Women's Textualities in Early Modern England (Material Texts) Hardcover – July 6, 2010


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$58.50
$48.98 $44.95

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The Bone Clocks
David Mitchell's hypnotic new novel crackles with invention and sheer storytelling pleasure. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: Material Texts
  • Hardcover: 344 pages
  • Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press (July 6, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0812242386
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812242386
  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 7.2 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,333,434 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Susan Frye's book is a beautiful and powerful contribution to scholarship on early modern women's material culture. . . . No other book covers such ground; Pens and Needles is an invaluable resource for art historians, social historians, literary critics, and anyone interested in the material world that early modern women made."—American Historical Review



"Susan Frye's book is most fascinating in drawing out the histories and texts, both written and sewn, of less well-known women, and showing that they saw their needlework as equally articulate, valuable, and artful as their words."—TLS



"Susan Frye's meticulously researched, beautifully illustrated, and brilliantly titled Pens and Needles makes a significant addition to a growing subfield in early modern gender studies: the expressive arts of women's needlework, which Frye sees as a mode of both female self-fashioning and creative communication."—Studies in English Literature 1500-1900



"Frye beautifully succeeds in aligning the different material practices, especially in the surprising discovery of a new portrait of Mary Queen of Scots embroidered by Bess of Hardwick."—Maureen Quilligan, Duke University



"No other book analyzes the combination of visual, textile, and textual modes in relation to early modern women as this one does. Frye draws on a vast range of sources, from comments on the minutiae of Shakespeare's plays, to contemporary translations of the poems of Mary Stuart, to a range of theorists including Michel de Certeau, Marcel Mauss and Karl Marx, to make a complex and convincing argument about women's consciousness and work."—Ann Rosalind Jones, Smith College

About the Author

Susan Frye is Professor of English at the University of Wyoming and author of Elizabeth I: The Competition for Representation.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By T.F. on December 18, 2011
Format: Hardcover
In this book Frye looks at the ways textiles function as "tools to express and explore identity" (p. 134), and how the combination of "visual and verbal media sustained and enriched everyday lives" (p. 133). Frye weaves together many different aspects of texts, textiles, and the lives of Northern/British Renaissance women, addressing power and reciprocity, the miniature and excess, the in/visible nature of women's domestic labour, the role of textiles and textile production in crossing and shifting social boundaries, textiles as literary metaphor, and the way women appropriated "suitable" textile narratives to create new meanings.

My personal favourite was a reading of how textiles function within Shakespeare's Othello and Cymbeline: I am sadly ignorant about Shakespeare (and literature), and this was a marvellous eye-opener.

The book is easy to read, entertaining, and footnoted in extensive detail. Everyone with an interest in textiles must read this.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images