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PeopleSoft Developer's Guide for PeopleTools and PeopleCode Paperback


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PeopleSoft Developer's Guide for PeopleTools and PeopleCode + PeopleSoft PeopleTools Tips & Techniques (Oracle Press) + PeopleSoft PeopleTools Data Management and Upgrade Handbook (Oracle Press)
Price for all three: $133.20

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 600 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Osborne Media; 1 edition (December 15, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0071496629
  • ISBN-13: 978-0071496629
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 7.4 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #877,246 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Judi A. Doolittle is a lead PeopleSoft Developer for the pension team at a National Laboratory. She is the executive vice president for the Independent Oracle Users Group (IOUG), and a member of the Fusion Council.

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Customer Reviews

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See all 17 customer reviews
It was an easy to read book with comprehensive examples.
Gbytes
Maybe the author had to add some filler to make the minimum number of pages, but not too much.
psconsultant
I'm frankly curious, and perhaps just a tad suspicious of all the 5-stars it has received.
Nikola Novak

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By psconsultant on January 10, 2009
Format: Paperback
This book receives a single star, and it would have received less if it was possible. Very few people will get any value from reading this book.

The beginning of the book describes the many modules that PeopleSoft has in its HR product ignoring PeopleSoft's other product lines. About 5% of the book is spent on these descriptions. Maybe the author had to add some filler to make the minimum number of pages, but not too much.

There are few examples for the reader, and the existing examples are poor at best. On p134-142, the book shows the steps to place an HTML box on a page. None of the steps explain what, how, or why anything was done. A new user will not know what to click to complete the steps, and an intermediate or advanced user will have no use for this trivial example.

Debugging is mentioned and a method is described in the text (p. 208-209). But there is no mention of using the PeopleSoft debugger that would allow someone to step through the code line by line. This omission illustrates the author's lack of familiarity with major parts of the PeopleSoft development environment.

On p323-332, the author gives her example of how the Integration Broker can be used, yet fails to mention these steps are only valid for PeopleTools 8.47 and lower. PeopleTools 8.48 updated and changed many parts of the messaging system. No explanation is given for PeopleTools 8.48, so if you are at that version, you're on your own. Maybe the author isn't familiar with the latest 8.48 version despite the claim on the back of the book.

On p413, the book talks about how to run an SQR stating "The next illustration shows all the available fields that may need to be filled out depending on your setup." What goes in the fields is a mystery.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Steve Walker on February 21, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you have been working with PeopleSoft for less than, say, 2 or 3 years the first half of the book will be very useful to you. The chapter on Advanced PeopleCode was quite good in my view and I learned a few things. This is coming from someone that has been using PeopleSoft for 11 years. XML Publisher is covered in some depth and has some good examples. I was surprised to find a reasonably good overview of Application Engine.

Overall likes:

1) The material is presented in a thoughtful, well written way that is easy for even non technical people to understand.
2) Some good sample code although it could have used some more.
3) Nice to see some information on COBOL, which for many of us has been a real black hole.

Overall dislikes:

1) Almost no coverage of Component Interface. This is a very useful tool and should have been given more attention.
2) PS Query is a good tool and very useful but I think that the author devoted too much space to it at the expense of other topics (see above).
3) I was hoping to be able to download some of the sample code that is presented in the book rather than having to retype it.

If you have used PeopleSoft for any length of time you know just how vast and complex it is. It is simply not possible to cover every topic in depth in 572 pages and I give the author credit for getting it mostly right. SQR In PeopleSoft is probably the best single topic book available for PeopleSoft and is a fantastic resource but it only covers SQR. This book covers SQR fairly well along with many other topics. If you are looking for a single book that covers everything then this is the one to get.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Donald Burleson on March 8, 2010
Format: Paperback
It's very difficult to write a comprehensive book about an ERP product. The book must cover all of the functionality and still provide valuable insights.

In this case the author has done an excellent job covering the major areas of PeopleSoft, and most important, explain how a standard PeopleSoft implementation has be extended for customized functionality.

This is a real world book and the code examples from COBOL were an especially nice touch.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Gbytes on October 13, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I've been working on Psoft on and off for a few years as a developer. The problems I've experienced is that I never get enough time with the application to retain any of what I've learned. My time is divided between various programming languages, environments, and applications all of which eventually seem to mesh into a big ball of similarity. This book helped me immensely in wrapping my head around the structure of Psoft and all those bits and pieces that you never have time to learn while deadlines loom overhead and projects continue to pile up. It was an easy to read book with comprehensive examples. The only draw back I have is on my Kindle it is difficult to see the pictures even when enlarged (I'm using the 3rd generation 6" Kindle). I imagine the pics will look better on the larger Kindle. That being said, all in all I feel I got more then my moneys worth with this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By SpottedCory on January 11, 2009
Format: Paperback
A needed book not well done.

There are some glimpse of insight in there, but you will have trouble finding them.

There are also errors.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Nikola Novak on November 22, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition
I've been a PeopleSoft Administrator/DBA for almost a decade now. I've taken a PeopleCode/AppEngine course at the beginning of my career, but have done almost no pure development since. For years I've been hoping that a well-written guide to development would come along to help me get into it more. I've pre-ordered this one the moment it's been announced, and after more than a year of giving it a chance this, sadly, I must say this is not that book.

Its faults are broad and systemic, not nitpicks: it is superficial, disorganized, glosses over important concepts while detailing marketing fluff, and all too frequently plain wrong - the worst sin of all in a technical guide. I'm frankly curious, and perhaps just a tad suspicious of all the 5-stars it has received.

First few chapters are PeopleSoft marketing material you could find on Oracle's main site. It's generously peppered with buzz-words: everything is "Scalable", "Integrated", "Managed", "Optimized". This is conceivably useful for somebody who's never heard of PeopleSoft, just to get them excited; they still won't get an idea of what any of these scalable, integrated, optimized things actually *do*, let alone how. Still, it only really covers HR modules, and superficially at that. Actual quote from the book, speaking of CRM & SQR: "I think that CRM is the exception here; I know that CRM has no COBOL, and I think that is true for SQR as well." Seriously?? An author from Oracle Press should take 10 seconds to ascertain if this is true or not. A technical book has no room for sentences like "I think this might be true, though maybe not". Figure it out, *then* start writing.

Eventually, we start getting to intro to development.
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