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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars RICK "SHAQ" GOLDSTEIN SAYS: "NINETEEN MINI-BIOGRAPHIES WRAPPED IN A 1956 WORLD SERIES PERFECT GAME"
The fifth game of the 1956 World Series on October 8, 1956 between the Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Yankees at Yankee Stadium was truly a game for the ages. Pitching for the Yankees that day was Don Larsen who when his entire career was complete... his statistics could not be considered much more than mediocre. In fact his lifetime stats show that he lost MORE games than...
Published on September 29, 2009 by Rick Shaq Goldstein

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I do love baseball....
yet this book left me disappointed. The book was not what I expected. I did not like the presentation of the information.
Published 15 months ago by Rusty in Dallas


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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars RICK "SHAQ" GOLDSTEIN SAYS: "NINETEEN MINI-BIOGRAPHIES WRAPPED IN A 1956 WORLD SERIES PERFECT GAME", September 29, 2009
The fifth game of the 1956 World Series on October 8, 1956 between the Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Yankees at Yankee Stadium was truly a game for the ages. Pitching for the Yankees that day was Don Larsen who when his entire career was complete... his statistics could not be considered much more than mediocre. In fact his lifetime stats show that he lost MORE games than he won. But... for this one game... he presented a master piece that had never been done before or since! Up until that day in 1956 no pitcher in the history of baseball had ever pitched a *NO-HITTER* in the World Series. Larsen not only pitched a *NO-HITTER*... but he also pitched a *PERFECT-GAME*. As of todays date 2009... another fifty-three-years-later... and this epic game still resides alone on the highest pedestal of World Series pitching magnificence. The story of this game has been told before... but never in the manner presented here by this author. What the author has so marvelously created is an inning by inning narrative that effortlessly flows by chapter into a mini-biography of each of the NINETEEN PLAYERS (including Larsen) involved in this game that became an instant classic.

I am a lifetime baseball fanatic who came from New York when it was almost a rite of passage that the Yankees and Dodgers would meet in the Fall Classic. These two neighboring teams met in the 1941... 1947... 1949... 1952... 1953... 1955... and 1956 World Series... so all the names here are familiar to me and yet I learned many new interesting facts about the players personal lives as well as their accomplishments... and disappointments on the field. For a potential reader who didn't benefit from the same exposure as I did... you would probably have to read ten to twenty separate baseball books to accrue the knowledge that this author has melded together in this crowning achievement of 1940's and 1950's baseball.

The chapters are broken down into the following players:
1. Don Larsen
2. Sal Maglie
3. Jackie Robinson and Gil McDougald
4. Sandy Amoros
5. Carl Furillo
6. Roy Campanella
7. Billy Martin
8. Duke Snider
9. Mickey Mantle
10. Pee Wee Reese
11. Yogi Berra
12. Andy Carey
13. Jim Gilliam
14. Enos Slaughter
15. Gil Hodges
16. Joe Collins
17. Hank Bauer
18. Dale Mitchell

If that isn't enough... after these eighteen exhilarating chapters... there is a nineteenth chapter entitled "AFTERMATH"... and this chapter is almost like getting a truck load of extra XMAS presents the day after XMAS! The author having probably read my mind... and any real baseball loving fans mind... then details where life on and off the field took every one of these nineteen ballplayers subsequent to the 1956 World Series. One of the many super interesting points brought up is the fact that every player on the field that day... other than Larsen and his catcher Yogi Berra... and I mean everyone *INCLUDING* Larsen's other seven teammates on the field at the time... agree that the last pitch of the game to Brooklyn's pinch hitter Dale Mitchell that was called a strike and ended the game... was a ball! Mickey Mantle said: "I HAD A CLEAR VIEW FROM CENTER FIELD, AND IF I WAS UNDER OATH, I'D HAVE TO SAY THE PITCH LOOKED LIKE IT WAS OUTSIDE." "ANDY CAREY, WHO HAD AN EVEN BETTER VIEW FROM THIRD BASE (BECAUSE MITCHELL WAS A LEFT-HANDED BATTER), LIKEWISE AGREED THAT THE LAST PITCH TO DALE MITCHELL WAS HIGH." GIL MCDOUGALD FROM SHORTSTOP SAID: "IT WASN'T EVEN CLOSE, IT WAS HIGH. EVEN ENOS SLAUGHTER, SURVEYING THE SCENE FROM LEFT FIELD, SIMILARLY TOLD A MEMBER OF THE BASEBALL HALL OF FAME STAFF THAT THE PITCH WAS HIGH." "Years later the Dodgers appeared to get some vindication from the home-plate umpire himself." "BABE PINELLI TOLD ME LATER, SAID DUKE SNIDER, THAT HE WANTED TO GO OUT ON A NO-HITTER IN A WORLD SERIES. THAT WAS THE LAST GAME HE WAS GOING TO UMPIRE. SO ANYTHING CLOSE WAS A STRIKE."

I recommend this book highly for every baseball fan... but it's more than a recommendation... it's a necessity... for any fan who wants to relive the highlights of the 1940's and 1950's... *WHEN BASEBALL WAS STILL A GAME!*
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unique look at the best game ever, October 4, 2009
Even after 54 years, Don Larsen's perfecto is the greatest game ever pitched. It was the first perfect game in the majors in 34 years and was done in a full Yankee Stadium against the Boys of Summer Brooklyn Dodgers, with a national TV audience. Pressure?

Lew Paper has given us a special take on this magical sports moment. He's broken down the game by bringing forth the 19 players who appeared in the box score - the most historic game any of them were ever in. They were all just passing through on their way to the Baseball Encyclopedia (some to the Hall of Fame), but on this day, they were part of baseball lore. And now, baseball literature.

Beautifully presented, this is a wonderful look at some superstars and some journeymen who all converged together to witness history. We know a lot about Yogi and Jackie, Campy and Mickey, but the supporting cast represent some of the most interesting baseball lives of their era.

Lew interviewed the living players or family members of the deceased ones and has given us a book that offers a new way to tell the story of a single game. Like Dan Okrent's classic "Nine Innings," this book will take its place as baseball literature. A terrific read!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Is This the Most Famous World Series Game Ever Played?, October 18, 2010
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This review is from: Perfect: Don Larsen's Miraculous World Series Game and the Men Who Made It Happen (Hardcover)
Would it be possible to write a fairly lengthy (360 pages) non-fiction book about a single baseball game? Some would probably be skeptical. Others would say a definite "no". Author Lew Paper would not agree, and to prove them wrong, he has done just that. His book, PERFECT: DON LARSEN'S MIRACULOUS WORLD SERIES GAME AND THE MEN WHO MADE IT HAPPEN, recounts a most unique game in major league baseball history: the only perfect game in World Series play (1903 to the present).

The day (afternoon games in those days) was Monday, October 8, 1956. The place: fabled Yankee Stadium in the Bronx section of New York City with 64,519 paying customers on hand. The teams who geared up for combat (baseball style) were the best in the US: New York's American League Yankees with their glitzy record of 16 World Series triumphs against the National League's Brooklyn Dodgers, the loveable but considerably less successful "Bums" (only one World Series triumph). The best of seven series was tied at two games each, and Game 5 would feature a pitching match between Brooklyn's Sal ("the barber") Maglie (he wasn't reluctant to throw close to the batter's whiskers) and the Yankees' Don ("the gooney bird") Larsen.

At this point some readers may still be wondering how or if one could write a 350 page book on a bseball game that lasted about two hours. I'll begin by revealing that there is rather little in the book about the game itself. Oh, all 27 outs are accounted for and described. But Mr. Paper apparently decided that a book going from out number one through 27 might not quite be what the reader wanted. So what he has done, essentially, is to write a collective biography of the 19 players who took part in the game, devoting a chapter to each of them. This makes for a somewhat different yet, at times, tedious book. (Lots of repetition; it seems their lives were rather similar.) I suppose the book bears some resemblance to Roger Kahn's THE BOYS OF SUMMER, though I admit it has been several decades since I read Kahn. A final chapter of this book (#19 "Aftermath") tells what happened to the 19 players later in life. A number remained in the game, several ending up as managers, in typical baseball fashion. Quite a few died young. None ended up in jail or prison, with Billy Martin and Duke Snider perhaps coming closest.

Oh, yes, the game itself! The Yankees won 2 to 0, with Yankee pitcher Larsen retiring all 27 of the Brooklyn batters he faced. (In baseball terminology, "retiring" means getting them out or preventing them from reaching first base.) So, to put this in perspective, in the over 100 years of baseball's grand climax ("World Series"), no other pitcher has ever accomplished what Larsen did that day. Now if you're interested in reading an analysis of what happened to enable Larsen to have achieved this, you won't find it here. There is very little analysis, interpretation, or even conjecture. The author is content to tell readers what happened and to describe the lives of those who participated. But we don't even learn that much about the hero, Larsen. We find out he smoked cigarettes between innings and didn't know what a "perfect game" was!
Tim Koerner October 18, 2010
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great work that exceeds because Paper stands on the shoulders of giants, January 30, 2010
To provide a new outlook on an event over 50 years since it happened is no small task -- and when it's finished, it had better be pretty darn good. Almost perfect, some might say.

Lew Paper takes on the task of Don Larsen's perfect game in the 1956 World Series, what many consider to be one of the greatest performances ever to grace a baseball field, and approaches it by profiling the 19 men who took the field that day.

Using a chapter format that reminded me of Charles Euchner's The Last Nine Innings, Paper profiles a player in each chapter (with one exception, where he profiles two players), followed by a brief recap of what happened that inning.

The book is tremendous, as it gives a remarkable picture of the players involved in that October 8, 1956 game that would forever imprint itself on the minds of baseball fans not just of the day, but for years to come. The game featured seven players that would be inducted into the Hall of Fame -Mickey Mantle, Enos Slaughter, Pee Wee Reese, Jackie Robinson, Yogi Berra, Duke Snider and Roy Campanella - and one, Gil Hodges, whom many believe should be there as well. Fifteen of the nineteen players made the All-Star Game at some point in their career. It was played in one of the games grandest cathedrals, Yankee Stadium, in front of 64,519 people - a crowd that no Major League ballpark could hold today.

Paper's approach of looking at each of the players on the field that day works very well, and serves as a ready reminder of the numerous personalities and backgrounds that shape the game of baseball. The game had just marked its first decade of being integrated, as Jackie Robinson, who debuted 10 years prior in 1947, would end up retiring at the end of the season rather than report to the New York Giants after the Dodgers sold it to them. Many of the players in that game were nearing the end of their playing careers, and Paper provides a concise look into their lives before, during, and after Don Larsen struck out Dale Mitchell for the final out.

You may be wondering - how does Paper do this, given that many of the players are long dead, yet there are so many quotes? I wondered this too - so I decided to flip through the book a bit.

It turns out that Paper's approach is similar to the one Mark Stewart and Mike Kennedy used in their 2006 work Hammering Hank: How the Media Made Henry Aaron. Paper compiled his quotes from dozens, possibly into the hundreds of sources over the past 50 years. He readily admits this, on page 365 though, which initially left a bad impression with me. Rather than burden the pages by dozens of footnotes, the references that Paper used are consolidated into a 35-page chapter of endnotes.

Lew Paper

Now it would seem that Paper isn't trying to pull a fast one on the reader, nor is he someone who just combed the records for quotes and pieced them together. Perfect is his fifth work, following up on four previous books - John F. Kennedy: The Promise and the Performance, Brandeis: An Intimate Biography, Empire: William S. Paley and the Making of CBS, and a novel, Deadly Risks. He certainly has an academic background, as he is a graduate of the University of Michigan and Harvard Law School, as well as Georgetown University, where he obtained a masters in law degree. He has written for The New York Times, The Washington Post, The New Republic, and The American Scholar. He is also a practicing lawyer in Washington, DC.

The idea for the book, Paper writes, came largely from two visits to a baseball camp in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, called the Mickey Mantle Memorial Week of Dreams, which later evolved into Heroes in Pinstripes, a camp offering the chance to play with and learn from Yankee legends. It was there that he got to speak with with several of the players from the game, including Larsen, Hank Bauer and Enos Slaughter. But needing much more to make a book of this scope work, he turned to the Hall of Fame and their records, as well as to Peter Golenbock, who has written a number of baseball books, including many on the Dodgers and Yankees.

Which is what brings me to how I find myself challenged to look at this book. On one hand, I am thoroughly impressed by the product that resulted after Paper's years of research and compiling of quotes and information. It is a resource that breaks down a momentous event in baseball history incredibly well and will likely be turned to by many interested in the subject for years to come. As I ask myself after I read every book - am I a better and more knowledgeable fan after reading this book? Undoubtedly.

On the other hand, I feel like there should be so many other people's names on the cover of the book - or at least given more credit at its start and throughout the pages. To paraphrase Sir Isaac Newton, Paper is able to see so far with this work because he stands on the shoulders of giants. While Paper provides them credit in the endnotes, the sheer quantity of resources relied on seems to warrant a different, and better, kind of treatment.

Loving, and therefore recommending Perfect requires a bit of trust on both my part and your part. As Paper readily admits in the endnotes, he relied on the work and writings of numerous other people. As time goes on, memories change, stories become embellished, and things don't get documented as accurately as they should. Depending on your existing knowledge of the game and the players, some things might conflict with what you already have learned. Paper acknowledges this and provides his thought process for resolving conflicts in stories, and while some might nitpick, many will find this an apt and capable recap and breakdown of the game and those involved in it. However, given how long ago Larsen authored his masterpiece, there is certainly plenty of time for discrepancies to creep into the story.

I feel compelled to mention that the editor's eye in me did catch a couple of editorial bobbles - a misspelling of home plate umpire Babe Pinelli's name, what looked like an errant footnote towards the end - but things that are ultimately forgivable and nothing worth quibbling over.

Overall though, a worthwhile read on a topic that will live on in baseball lore for many years to come.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mortals Are We All Of Us, December 18, 2009
By 
Bill Emblom "Bill Emblom" (Ishpeming, Michigan USA) - See all my reviews
As a previous reviewer noted this book is really 18 mini-biographies of the players who took part in that unforgettable game on October 8, 1956. I wavered whether I should attend school in 8th grade that day or listen to the game on the radio. School won out and I missed the game. Several of the anecdotes involving the participants have been recounted in other books, but there was some new stories as well. One that I particularly liked involved broadcaster Bob Wolff and Billy Martin. Martin had a temper-tantrum after being removed from a game after striking out and threw his bat and glove down in front of the manager. Wolff encountered Martin in the clubhouse after the game and told him that if he demonstrated this type of behavior he would never be a manager. "You wouldn't like it if you were a manager and a player did that to you." Years later Martin reminded Wolff of that advice and told him how much it meant to him.

The actual details of each of the half innings really take up only a few paragraphs, while the bulk of each chapter involves a summary of each player's career. One of the anecdotes involving Pee Wee Reese on page 177 I heard Joe Garagiola on an old phonograph record called "That Holler Guy" credit to Clem Koshorek. Perhaps Reese used it as well. Page 163 had an error in which umpire Babe Pinelli is called "Pinella." Perhaps the author would like to correct this in the paperback edition.

The final chapter, (19 Aftermath), puts this book over the top. Several recent books now conclude with a "where are they now?". This book has the best rendition I have read which provides the reader with what happened to each of the game's participants after their baseball career ended. Several have passed on from a variety of causes such as cancer or heart attacks. Jim Gilliam died from high blood pressure which probably had not been diagnosed. For each of the players with health problems there is a warning for each of us to avoid some of the pitfalls that befell the players.

This book is a reminder that we are losing the generation of players who played during the 1950s. If you are of this generation treat yourself to a little nostalgia. And if you aren't read the book and see what you missed.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Fine Nostalgic Look at the Old Days, Gone Forever., December 30, 2009
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"Perfect" is all about the fateful afternoon of Monday, October 8, 1956 when the Yankees' Don Larsen pitched a perfect game against the Brooklyn Dodgers. It was the fifth game of the World Series, played at Yankee Stadium on a beautiful, clear Fall day. "Perfect" concerns itself almost exclusively with the eighteen starters on the teams, plus that fateful pinch hitter, Dale Mitchell. This reviewer, a baseball-obsessed 9 year old at the time, has to state-up front- a little kvetching about 2 items in the text: >Sandy Amros' classic catch came in the 6th inning of game 7 of the '55 series. >Pete Rozelle was the 2nd commissioner of the NFL, succeeding the legendary Bert Bell. There are other eyebrow- raisers here, left unstated. Each starter (plus Mitchell) is granted his own chapter. Jackie Robinson and Gil McDougald share their own. Favorites are subjective but his reader preferred those on Joe Collins, Duke Snider, Sal Maglie and Enos Slaughter. Slaughter's pinch homer had won Game 3, with this reviewer in attendance. Did anything slow that guy down? An aftermath section closes the circle on what later life held for these guys, some of the tales not pretty. The Boys of Summer, in Dodger Blue or pinstripes did not last forever. This fan could never understand why Casey failed to find a slot for Sal Maglie after Brooklyn sold him to the Yankees. And that avocado farm in California never made the Duke rich; we used to read about that spread all the time! In fairness to the author, there are 35 pages of end notes, a solid bibliography and ample proof of painstaking research with some 46 interviews. The kvetching above should be taken with a dab of salt. "Perfect" is a tale of personalities and author Paper has hit the mark in his portrayals.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best sports book I've read in a long time., February 25, 2011
By 
J. Horn (Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Perfect: Don Larsen's Miraculous World Series Game and the Men Who Made It Happen (Hardcover)
This book wasn't exactly what I expected but I sure enjoyed the heck out of it. Lew Paper is a very intelligent and professional writer who made the mini-biographies of each of the 19 players who participated in the game both interesting and enlightening. The format of covering their lives only up to the point of Larsen's perfect game somehow made the event seem like it happened in the recent past and the final chapter of the book, in which he told the story of what happened to the players in the 50+ years after the game, tied a nice bow on the package.

The chapters on lesser known players like Andy Carey, Dale Mitchell, and even Don Larsen, were most interesting because, even though I knew all about their baseball careers, I didn't know much about them as people. Even the chapter on seldom written about hall of famer Enos Slaughter shed a lot of light on his private life. Paper was able to cover the lives of all of the participants, up to October 1956, in great detail in the 20 or so pages he devoted to each of them.

I read nothing but sports books and I have to rate this one in the top 10% of the hundreds that I've read in my life. Buy it!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolute 'MUST READ' for any avid sports fan., October 21, 2009
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Lew Paper takes us on a truly memorable journey through one of the golden eras of baseball. He briefly opens a lens into the lives many baseball legends such as Mickey Mantle and Yogi Berra just to name a few. Unless you have read biographies on each of these 18 men you are bound to learn some interesting things you didn't know. Paper's prologue of each player's life prior to the game, the player's contribution (or lack thereof) in the game itself and finally, their life after the Pefect Game makes this book special.

We forget how starkly different professional sports were in the middle of the last century. Many of these players came from backgrounds that were beyond humble. Some worked second jobs to support their baseball habit. And to a man, they loved the game.

You don't have to be a baseball fan to enjoy this book. You'll recognize many of the names, you'll empathize with their lives and you should be thoroughly entertained.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars GREAT READ, November 7, 2009
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THIS IS BY NO DOUBT ONE OF THE BEST SPORT BOOKS I HAVE EVER READ. EACH CHAPTER IS A MINI-BIOGRAPHY OF ONE OF THE PLAYERS ON THE BROOKLYN DODGERS OR NEW YORK YANKEES IN THE 1955 WORLD SERIES, MANY OF WHOM ARE NOW ENSHRINED IN THE BASEBALL HALL OF FAME. THE WAY THAT EVERY AT BAT IS DESCRIBED AT THE END OF EACH CHAPTER ALMOST ADDED SUSPENSE EVEN THOUGH YOU KNOW THAT NONE OF THE DODGERS REACHED FIRST BASE. I ESPECIALLY ENJOYED THE EPILOGUE WHERE THE AUTHOR TELLS YOU WHERE EACH PLAYER IS NOW AND WHAT THEY HAVE DONE SINCE THE GAME. I HIGHLY RECOMMEND THIS BOOK TO PEOPLE OF MY AGE WHO REMEMBER THE GAME AND TO YOUNG SPORTS FANS WHO CAN APPRECIATE WHAT DON LARSEN ACCOMPLISHED.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars interesting stories and a game with great drama, August 22, 2010
This review is from: Perfect: Don Larsen's Miraculous World Series Game and the Men Who Made It Happen (Hardcover)
Don Larsen's perfect game has a special place in my life. I was 9 years old and a Yankee fan when all my friends and my brother were Brooklyn Dodger fans. My elementary school was less than a block away from my home. As most guys over 55 will remember the World Series was played in the daytime (all seven games). Every day during the series all the games were played in New York (the Bronx and Brooklyn). So each game started around 2 PM. Games were played much more quickly then with most games taking slightly more than 2 hours. School ended around 3 PM. So I would get home by 3:30 usually. During the series I would run home and turn the TV on and usually see the last 3 or 4 innings. On this faithful day I turned the TV on and there was no game! What happened? Later I learned that Don Larsen had pitched a perfect game and the game went by so fast that it was over in an hour and a half. Maglie pitched a 5 hitter and with the Yankees only scoring 2 runs it was no wonder the game was over so quickly. I had never even witnessed a no hitter. Now I missed a perfect game and in a World Series. So for years I had to settle for pictures and replays of some of the most dramatic plays. With ESPN and now the new MLB Network these classic games are replayed in their entirety but I still have not seen the whole game.

So this is the background for this book. I anticipated hearing commentary on every play and a description of what was going on in the minds of the players as the game progressed. With such expectations I was a bit disappointed. This book is a commentary about the lives of some of the players that played in the game. The game itself was mainly background for these stories. Each chapter covers a half inning of the game. This usually means a paragraph at the end of the chapter covering plays. In Larsen's case with batters going down 1-2-3 there was not much to says with the exception of two or three special plays. So I was disappointed.

The stories were great. Stories about Gil McDougald, Jackie Robinson, Mickey Mantle, Gil Hodges, Billy Martin and Yogi Berra I had heard before. But stories about Enos Slaughter, Duke Snider, Andy Carey, Joe Collins, Jim (Junior)Gilliam, Sal Maglie, Dale Mitchell and even Larsen himself were new to me and all were well-told. So overall I have to say this is a good book. It is different from what I expected. So if you are looking for a detailed pitch-by-pitch account you will be disappointed. But if you want to hear stories about Campanella, Pee Wee Reese, Carl Furillo, Hank Bauer, Sandy Amoros and the others that I mentioned this book is for you.

Lew Paper even has an aftermath chapter describing what happened to these men for their remaining years after the game (many of these players have passed away but some are still living).
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Perfect: Don Larsen's Miraculous World Series Game and the Men Who Made It Happen
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