Perfume 2001 R CC

Amazon Instant Video

(9) IMDb 3.6/10
Available in HD
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A week in the lives of a group of models, photographers, agents, reporters, publicists and other characters during a wild modeling show in New York City.

Starring:
Lysa Apostle, Joanne Baron
Runtime:
1 hour, 47 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

Perfume

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Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Michael Rymer
Starring Lysa Apostle, Joanne Baron
Supporting actors Morena Baccarin, Kylie Bax, Angela Bettis, Heather J. Braden, Sonia Braga, D.W. Brown, Chemin-Martinez Carroll, Hunter Carson, Murielle Arden, Carol Commissiong, Sara Conca, Eve Cook, Coolio, Veronica De Laurentiis, Paul Diomede, Carmen Ejogo, Carmen Electra, Cristen Elmore
Studio Lionsgate
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

This movie is just one absurd, disjointed, and boring scene after another.
RR in Texas
The little caveat at the beginning of the credits should also be on the DVD box, "All actors dialogue was improvised".
K. Clark
Because of the quick pace, you pay attention to the exchanges and not overly scrutinize the acting.
R. K. Tam

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By R. K. Tam on May 27, 2002
Format: DVD
I had been waiting for this movie to hit the theaters after having read about its showing at Sundance, and was quite surprised to see that it went directly to dvd. Especially with such a deep cast.
At first I couldn't tell whether it was a comedy or docudrama. Having seen it I still wonder.
Rather than one storyline this movie is about several. There is the designer (Rita Wilson) whose partner (Leslie Mann) has left her to seek fortune elsewhere. There is the Versace-esque Italian designer (Paul Sirvino) who must face health and family crises. There is the photographer (Jared Harris) juggling work and personal relationship. Then there's the magazine editor (Joanne Baron) whose abandoned daughter (Michelle Williams) suddenly reappears in her life.
Director Rymer wants to give the audience an inside look at the fashion industry, and he does accomplish this on several levels. The designer's assistants following her everywhere; the brief but very real segment of shuffling seating assignments for a fashion show; the editor's assistant (Angela Bettis) screening for her worshipped boss. Some of the exchanges are readily identifiable to all (photographer and girlfriend), some are true-to-life but foreign to those outside the industry (designer and her assistants) but some are so last season (conglomerate quoting Henry James).
What this film needs is more attitude. We see the backstabbing and false niceties, but the only part of the movie that reflects the snobbishness prevalent in the industry is at the reception desk at the magazine office.
Those without first-hand experience with New Yorkers might doubt the dialogue, but it is largely faithful.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Audra Thomas on May 15, 2006
Format: VHS Tape
... of the giddily-demented and lunatic world of high fashion along with its tandem industries, where all the egos come "super-sized". Always with personal dramas big enough to match, as everone is truly an "artiste"... of one type or another, and ALWAYS facing a career-altering and earth-shattering crisis of some kind, it's as if they're all living on some isolated island... cast-off from the real world, sucking-up all the abundant co-dependent and self-perpetuating "it's all about me" energy available just to remain alive, slowing sinking into their own self-importance; they are collectively their own eco/ego-system... but so many of us actually listen to what they have to say!!! Their pronouncements are biblical in proportion. I must admit that I watched this film three times, back-to-back, totally absorbed and fascinated.The many wonderful actors, obviously with specific real people in mind and drawing upon same, superbly paint their characterizations in broadly egocentric stokes, creating a rich glimpse into the closed, insular ghetto-ized world of high fashion, where everone is a STAR... or at least believes themself to be, and certainly behaves "as if ". BRAVO!!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By RR in Texas on October 17, 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Perfume is a ridiculous display of wealthy neurotic NYC yuppies and their self-centered lives. It is a waste of time to watch this one, unless you want to see what is wrong with America today. That these people probably do exist, and have positions with some prestige, is a testament to the decadence of NYC in specific and America in general. This movie is just one absurd, disjointed, and boring scene after another.

The only reason I gave it two stars rather than one star is that it does reveal, albeit in a non entertaining manner, the sick and tragic people involved in the NYC art and fashion world.
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6 of 9 people found the following review helpful By "arambilet" on February 3, 2003
Format: DVD
Date: 3/2/2003
Summary: Incredible film; bears watching more than once!
A review in IMDB can't say it better! -
Quote-Excerpt:
If you've ever been around "the fashion world," or grown up reading "fashion magazines," you will understand EXACTLY what this film portrays: "Life, Exactly As They Know It!" The "choppiness" and "vagueness" objected to by other reviewers is EXACTLY why this is such a great film, why this is such a "Real" film: anyone who has ever been around "these people" will see exactly how the dialogue mirrors "real life" in the fashion / magazine biz. The "one real scene" between Hemmingway and the photographer (as described by another reviewer) is precisely showing how rare and difficult a "real" moment is to find. In fact, they are ALL "real scenes," wherein lies their power. The scene where the daughter, (not "drug addled," by the way, as described by another reviewer) who is the antithesis of "fashion," describes how reading magazines "makes her feel bad about herself" and her mother's instant rejection and leaving of the restaurant, is telling precisely the truth. And then any woman who rejects "fashion standards" is left alone at the table. The emptiness of the life and the constant ebb and flow of current, changing tides, makes any real or lasting connection impossible. This is even alluded to with Paul Sorvino in one discussion about going to the hip-hop look: something to the effect of "in Europe, classic can last... in America, you have to keep moving!" Then the hip hop boys point out that the baggy-pants hip hop look was born from poverty and "10 brothers and sisters, but the suburban kids will follow" even at an unaffordable $150.00 a pop! But that's the game!
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