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190 of 201 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Smell You Later--"Perfume" Is A Wild And Pungent Ride Through A Demented World
It must be a daunting task when a filmmaker attempts to adapt a novel that has been deemed "unfilmable." Such is the challenge Tom Tykwer (the audacious "Run, Lola, Run") accepted when he decided to film "Perfume: The Story of a Murderer," the wildly popular cult novel by Patrick Suskind first printed in the US in 1986. Intrinsic to the success of telling the tale of...
Published on February 15, 2007 by K. Harris

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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars "He's an angel!" ... No, He Just Needs to Bathe.
I read Suskind's work as an undergraduate ... and its details are still grotesquely etched on my brain. I cannot say that I "liked" the novel, but I was engrossed enough to complete it. Fast-forward a decade ... and the same applies to Tykwer's film-adaptation.

Within the first few seconds, I felt a visceral repulsion to the film (as the viewer is expected to)...
Published on November 6, 2007 by Dr. E


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190 of 201 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Smell You Later--"Perfume" Is A Wild And Pungent Ride Through A Demented World, February 15, 2007
It must be a daunting task when a filmmaker attempts to adapt a novel that has been deemed "unfilmable." Such is the challenge Tom Tykwer (the audacious "Run, Lola, Run") accepted when he decided to film "Perfume: The Story of a Murderer," the wildly popular cult novel by Patrick Suskind first printed in the US in 1986. Intrinsic to the success of telling the tale of "Perfume" is to convey a palpable sense of "smell" and its intoxicating powers. While a book may do this with pages and pages of prose, a film does not have this descriptive luxury--hence, it must attempt some sort of visual shorthand. I'm pleased to say that Tykwer was up to the task. With vivid art direction, stunning visuals, and bold editing choices--you feel, almost, as if you can smell this peculiar tale. While this may sound like dubious praise, it is actually the highest compliment.

Set in 18th century France, "Perfume" relates the tragic tale of Jean-Baptiste Grenouille (Ben Whishaw). Born and almost killed in a fish market, raised in an orphanage, put into manual (and often dangerous) service at a young age, Jean-Baptiste is a disaffected and disconnected youth. Having no social skills and lacking any kind of normal emotional processes, the one thing that differentiates Jean-Baptiste is his keen sense of smell. It seems to be the only thing that connects him to the world he lives in. A chance visit to the city brings him to a perfume shop/manufacturer. Captivated by this world that revolves around the olfactory senses, Jean-Baptiste aggressively pursues a position with the proprietor (Dustin Hoffman). After achieving some success and freedom, he becomes obsessed with procuring the perfect scent--one that he once smelled in the "essence" of a beautiful young woman. Jean-Baptiste's obsessive bent soon leads to murder (no spoiler here, it is the title) as he seeks to extract this intoxicating smell from his victims. It's as if creating this one perfect scent will somehow humanize him--but to attempt it, he becomes even more monstrous.

In the opening minutes of "Perfume," I was absolutely blown away. The visual impact of the early scenes is astonishing and unique. The tale, however, does settle down into a more routine and more familiar pattern. But while it doesn't maintain the frenetic and captivating pace, it is never less than intriguing and certainly beautiful to view. Technically, the film is awesome. I've already mentioned art direction and editing, but scoring, cinematography, and costuming are all top notch. Jean-Baptiste, who is really in every scene, can be a challenging central character--Whishaw plays him fairly vacantly. It is a one note performance, but largely because that's what the story calls for--a certain emotional flatness. Therefore, I thought it was effective--others might find it somewhat empty.

I suspect many will absolutely loathe "Perfume," however, for I have yet to speak about the ending. The ending is absolutely outrageous, and I suspect that it will polarize audiences into "love it/hate it" camps. It's so over-the-top, so unlike anything you might foresee, and so unlike anything you've ever witnessed in a film before. Yet, for me, these excesses worked and fit well with the tone of this lurid little tale. Love it or hate it, it's a bold choice--and one you're not likely to forget. So I am recommending "Perfume" for those that like something different--this is not standard Hollywood fare, and I mean that in a good way. KGHarris, 02/07.
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59 of 68 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "Perfume": The Smell Stays on Your Skin -- Whether You Like it or Not, April 9, 2007
By 
Tsuyoshi (Kyoto, Japan) - See all my reviews
If you're looking for something unusual, unconventional and unpredictable, "Perfume" is your film. I am not saying this will give a pleasant smell to you. Probably some people would be attracted to the complexity of the strange world where olfactory perception means everything. Or some would loath the film's story and main character itself, especially the conclusion. Whatever you may find it, Tom Tykwer's "Perfume" remains intriguing throughout as allegorical tale, dark comedy or serial killer suspense. Pick your choice.

With John Hurt as narrator with slightly mocking tone, the eventful life story of Jean-Baptiste Grenouille is introduced, and from the very first moment you realize "Perfume" is no ordinary film. The film successfully conveys how Paris in the 18th century (at least one certain district) smelled really bad, with too realistic scene of its fish market, which is followed by the birth of Jean-Baptiste. His life is destined to be a different one, and the first chapter fully convinces us of his fate.

Ben Whishaw plays adult Jean-Baptiste Grenouille, and his wonderful acting as the (anti-)hero virtually carries the entire film to the last. Typical rags-to-riches drama is given a twist when other characters step in his life. First Jean-Baptiste is apprenticed to Giuseppe Baldini, second-rate perfumer who lost his skills. Dustin Hoffman's fake Italian accent may annoy you, but wait for what happens. Jean-Baptiste creates a "hit" perfume with his superb olfactory sense, making Baldini a rich person, and then ... see it for yourself. The story is not definitely Charles Dickens.

Beautiful Rachel Hurd-Wood and Alan Rickman are both memorable as aristocratic father and his only daughter. Tom Tykwer relies much on their acting talent to create the credible relations between them, which is I think still underwritten and not interesting enough. His skills as director are more effective in presenting Jean-Baptiste who can create the perfect scent in the most unique and terrifying fashion.

As to its conclusion - don't worry, this is spoiler-free - you will find it either fascinating or just awful. But maybe we shouldn't take the story too seriously for "grenouille" also means "frog" in French. "Perfume" defies easy explanations like real perfumes you smell every day. "Perfume" has that inexplicable quality that makes itself all the more attractive to us.
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46 of 54 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The scent of desire, May 19, 2007
How exactly do you make a movie about smells? After all, a movie is all about sight and sound. Touch, taste and smell rarely come into it.

But acclaimed German director Tom Tykwer manages to make us smell things, in his most disturbing movie to date, "Perfume: The Story of a Murderer." This time around, the talented Tykwer abandons his usual lovers-against-the-world stories for a lushly-filmed, darkly comic story of olfactory obsession. Yes, that is what I said.

Jean-Baptiste Grenouillle (Ben Whishaw) is a man with a brilliant sense of smell, and zero body odor. He was born in a putrid fishmarket, raised in an orphanage, and later escapes from a tannery where he was working. He's enraptured by the many thrilling smells in the city -- he even kills a young girl, so that he can smell her lovely scent.

In his search for the perfect scent, Jean-Baptiste gets a job with a once-famed perfume-maker (Dustin Hoffman). But after learning that not everything has a scent, he begins killing women to try to distill their scents into the ultimate perfume -- with beautiful redhead Laura (Rachel Hurd-Wood) as the "thirteenth scent." But his ultimate scent has an even more sinister side, as his scents begin to affect the population in unusual ways.

"Perfume" is Tykwer's most unique movie to date, and the one that definitely identifies him as a cinematic master. There are lots of music that are evocative, sensual, colourfully beautiful, or unspeakably creepy, but not many manage to be all of them. "Perfume: The Story of a Murderer" is all of those, and more.

Obviously a movie doesn't smell like anything, except maybe stale popcorn. So Tykwer uses sight for smell -- rotted fish, maggots, moldy walls from the late 1700s to show Jean-Baptiste's miserable origins. And he uses sparkling colour and windblown trees for nicer scents. Colour takes the place of scent itself -- bright red Lola hair on multiple girls, flowers that seem to pop out of the screen, fresh leaves, brilliant fruits, even brightly coloured food. It gives the visuals a fairy-tale vibrancy.

In fact, the scripting almost comes second to the exquisite cinematography. Yet Tykwer is able to bring across the powerful symbolism that brings the movie to life -- the smells are symbolic of love itself, which the scentless and amoral Jean-Baptiste does not have. He can only try to take it from others, with a finale that is the very image of poetic justice.

Jean-Baptiste himself is one of those love/hate characters, and Whishaw does an excellent job with his sort of half-crazy, intent stare. And there are some great supporting performances by Alan Rickman as Antoine Richis (Laura's dad) and Hoffman as the eccentric old perfume-maker -- he adds a welcome note of comedy.

A movie is dependent on sight, but Tom Tykwer creates a movie that you can almost smell. "Perfume: The Story of a Murderer" is darkly comic, bizarrely beautiful movie, and definitely worth seeing.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars "He's an angel!" ... No, He Just Needs to Bathe., November 6, 2007
I read Suskind's work as an undergraduate ... and its details are still grotesquely etched on my brain. I cannot say that I "liked" the novel, but I was engrossed enough to complete it. Fast-forward a decade ... and the same applies to Tykwer's film-adaptation.

Within the first few seconds, I felt a visceral repulsion to the film (as the viewer is expected to). The quick-cuts of the putrid marketplace creates revulsion and distance ... which is why many viewers here expressed a sense of "not caring about the characters" (this is valid). Likewise, Tykwer (true to Suskind) resists romanticizing Paris ... few directors are this straight-forward. The place is revealed as filthy, with a near-tangible stench (this is why we see members of aristocracy holding scented handkerchiefs under their noses). Even the long-shots of the city show stained, unappealing building facades. Who knew an artist could create a visual so fetid that the viewer can actual smell it?! Brilliance.

Hoffman is convincing is his role as an aging perfumer. His portrayal of Giuseppe Baldini is as amusing as it is compelling. Likewise, Alan Rickman's "Richis" may be the character with whom the viewer can align her/himself. He is the voice of reason ... all of his "paranoid" obsessions are completely justified ... but no one will listen. His frustration is ours. Still, this is not enough to forge a connection between the film and the viewer. We find ourselves not caring when his beautiful daughter is being hunted for her scent. (And there is an attempt at garnering emotion ... evident in the delicate replacing of the flower on her mother's grave).

This is a film with no catharsis (which is fine), but couple that with its dreary setting and vulgar displays, and the film becomes impossible to "like." This does not mean the film fails to intrigue, it simply means that a viewer may walk-away feeling empty. And, perhaps worse, wondering why the film was created at all. And, yes, it is true that Kubrick was intrigued by the text, but found it "unfilmable." I wonder what spurred Tykwer to tackle the text a master found "unfilmable"? One is forced to assume hubris was at work here ... and this gamble was not a (TECHNICALLY) successful one. The budget for this work was a staggering $65,800,000 and was an epic, box-office failure. In fact, I have never before or after read such a vehement review from the much esteemed Chicago Sun-Times Richard Roeper: "Hated this movie. Hated it" (his literal words). Still, consider the equally (perhaps even more) esteemed Ebert who found it "brave" (to paraphrase). I think it may be JUST that polarizing.

My middle-of-the-road review is both an acknowledgment of the film's artistic merits and a recognition of its tendency to evince viewer-apathy (including mine).

If you have an interest in seeing Suskind's work on-screen buy this film. If you were a huge fan of "Lola Rennt" (Run Lola Run) then buy this film. However, if you are entering this work "blind" ... you may wish to rent it first.
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55 of 72 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A MOVIE THAT STINKS (LITERALLY), October 16, 2006
By 
Everyone who read Patrick Suskind's "Das Parfum" must remember how well-scented and at the same time fetid it was. Every page of the novel effuses some smell and it literally makes you either savor it or hold your nose in disgust. Suskind's talent in describing different kinds of flavour can't be overestimated, like a real poet he finds words and metaphors that sometimes let you salivate and sometimes bring you very close to throwing up. In my opinion the main challenge of this film from the very beginning of its creation was: will this movie smell like the book does?

Many great directors were to make "Perfume..." and many washed their hands for a variety of reasons. Martin Scorsese, Milos Forman, Tim Burton and others - all of them were once attached to the project and walked away. Stanley Kubrick nurtured the idea of filming Suskind's novel for a long time but finally concluded "Das Parfum" was UNFILMABLE. And I can understand that - the book based on all kinds of odours is very hard to be put on celluloid. So walking to the theater I was recalling the book's first scene taking place at Paris' fish market couple of centuries back and thinking - will it all smell?

And - oh, my God - it did! It smelled and it reeked right from the screen. Certainly the book smelled better (or worse in this case) but those things you do not see but only imagine always hit harder, so I doubt any movie can be better than a book. But in this case actually it wasn't this film's idea - to top the novel, it just had to match it distantly. And it matched indeed. "Perfume..." is no cheap adaptation of another book - it's a piece of art of its own and it deserves some recognition. Tom Tykwer - a young German director whose best-known work to date was "Run, Lola, Run" seemed rather strange candidate to direct this picture at the first glance, but ultimately it turned out to be a wise idea. Tykwer is not afraid to experiment and we've seen it in "Lola". Many of his patterns and tricks from that movie were later used by a number of directors around the world. He is innovative and that's a fact. If you close your eyes and try hard to imagine what Martin Scorsese, Milos Forman or Tim Burton would do with this picture, I bet you'll come up with some idea and I bet it will be right. But what could we expect from Tom Tykwer? Only some surprise.

Finally there were no surprise and in "Perfume..." Tykwer didn't invent anything. It was pretty traditional I'd say, but still very professional, magnificent and exciting. Still better than I think any other director would manage it. And what's most important - it SMELLED. It had all the scents and fragrances needed to feel yourself inside this movie. Tykwer didn't do the impossible, but he was very close... And in this case it's a hell of an achievement.

Actors deserve a whole separate article, I'll only say Ben Whishaw and everyone else except Dustin Hoffman were awesome and the latter is still playing the role of Bernie Focker as it seems with all my respect :) Although I like THAT role of his a lot I think here he could be a little more serious. On the other hand - don't pay attention to my lamentations - a comic part was never too bad for any movie. So maybe it's just me. Anyway - why 4 stars? 5 would go for the impossible done by the director, but unfortunately I'm positive it was impossible to do so (no pun intended). Hence 4 is the highest rating this picture can get in my opinion and I'm giving it the highest rating possible.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A strange and unique tale, January 21, 2008
The first noise Jean-Baptiste Grenouille ever made sent his mother to the gallows, and death followed him for the rest of his days. So begins the truly unique film "Perfume: The Story of Murderer." Though classified as a German film, "Perfume" is spoken entirely in English with some French writing. Based on the German novel of the same name, the story of the life of Grenouille (Ben Whishaw) can be viewed literally or as spiritual symbolism.

From his birth, Grenouille was different. Born with an incredibly powerful sense of smell, he experiences the world (set in Paris in the 1600's) primarily through scent. Orphaned and raised into a life of near silent servitude, naturally he is socially inept, and his only concern is to experience all the smells the world has to offer.

Upon his first visit to the market in Paris, he's immediately taken in by the overwhelming smells of the places, people and products around him, particularly the perfume boutiques.

Smelling is his way of experiencing the world, but his attention is absorbed entirely when a young woman selling fruit passes him by. He follows her, becoming completely enveloped by her smell. When she sees he has followed to her home, she screams. Attempting to muffle her screams, Grenouille accidentally suffocates her, but his remorse for taking a life is immediately dwarfed by his compulsion to take in her smell. He rips her clothing off and passionately begins smelling every crevice of her body, basking in her scent. But it quickly fades, and panic sets in. He mourns the loss of her scent more than the loss of her life.

It is at that moment he becomes determined to learn how to preserve smell. He finagles his way into becoming the apprentice of Giuseppe Baldini (Dustin Hoffman) an aging perfumer. Grenouille wows him by not only replicating, but improving on the formula of a competitor's hottest selling perfume, rejuvenating Baldini's failing business. As he studies to find a way to perfectly preserve smell, Grenouille shows a total disregard for social niceties, and even life itself. He eventually leaves Paris for the small village of Grasse, when he believes he'll learn everything he needs to know. Before he leaves, Baldini tells him of the 12 parts of every perfume, and the legend of a 13th part that would make the "ultimate perfume."

13 parts to the perfect perfume It is the meetings between Baldini and Grenouille that opens the spiritual symbolism of the film. Baldini says that an object's soul is in its smell, and this simple comment reflects in everything that happens in the film. From here, the viewer can choose to see things as they literally happen, or in a spiritual sense. When his first victim died, was it really her soul that was leaving her body, or did she simply stop producing pheromones? The real effects of pheromones in perfume have been debunked in recent years, but the novel was penned over 22 years ago.

On his journey to Grasse, Grenouille is horrified to learn he has no smell/soul of his own. When he begins to target beautiful women to preserve their smells, one can't help but wonder if he's not trying to steal their souls as well.

I was with this movie until the bizarre ending, which I'm guessing is the reason Stanley Kubrick believed the book could not be adapted to the big screen.

Despite the title, the movie is not really about murder. There are no gruesome death sequences, and in fact, most deaths are not shown on screen. Instead, the focus is on Grenouille's actions to preserve them and use them as parts of the ultimate perfume. The story of a murderer really becomes the story of a soulless man looking for a way to fill the void.

Though the story itself was interesting, I was more impressed by presentation. Grenouille himself goes long periods of time without speaking, but great cinematography coupled with an intense score builds a strong understanding between the audience and the characters. I have to give a lot of credit to Director Tom Tykwer for finding a way to dramatically and accurately represent the rush of emotions Grenouille experiences from a sense that cannot possibly be shared with the audience through the given medium. I mean, how do you communicate smells on film?

This is not to say the film is without its flaws. As mentioned earlier, the ending (the last 30 minutes) lost me despite its accuracy, and some points go well past the line of overdramatic. I would have enjoyed seeing more about how Grenouille avoids being caught despite the efforts of law enforcement and how a completely uneducated man develops a system of smell preservation beyond what any other individual in the industry had done. The overall package still stands, but the weaknesses are apparent.

Final Score: 7

A good movie with a unique story. If you're looking for something out of the ordinary to watch, check this one out.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars "I've the best nose in all of France", October 24, 2007
"Perfume" describes a boy in 1800's France left for dead. At odds in the world, he acquires an unusual gift, the gift of smell, and not just any gift...one of extraordinary and unique talent. Unable or unwilling to speak, Jean-Louis Baptist prefers to use his sense of smell to define his environment, to define the world as he knows and understands it. To him words are too primitive and restricting to communicate what he sees, hears, or wants to say.
Sold twice over, what seems like a dismal existence to work in a tannery he one day discovers a smell so profound, so intoxicating and so beautiful he is forever changed and is obsessed with obtaining its essence. He finds himself in an apprenticeship as a perfumist where he learns the art and skill of obtaining the essence of smell, but it still is not enough. That unique smell that he discovered from a woman has him so self obsessed; he stops at nothing to obtain it. Through trial and error he constantly experiments to find a way until one day he does with a prostitute.
From there he goes on a killing spree, as a 19th. Century serial murder in order to obtain the essence of smell from the most beautiful and purest of women to create the most perfect perfume the world has ever known. At long last he is caught and stands to be executed upon the eve that he will unveil his creation. A perfume extracted from 12 young women that is so perfect, so intoxicating, he can bend the will of mankind with it. He is found to be not guilty and deemed, "an Angel" and released. In the end he chooses his own fate and demise, and the secret of his perfect perfume dies with him.
I found this film to be extremely well done. Excellently written and adapted from the novel, a great cast (both Allan Rickman and Dustin Hoffman are great to see onscreen). I thoroughly enjoyed the film from start to nearly the end. I found the end to be a slight let down, and a bit of a "cop out".
I didn't care much for the town orgy scene. I know that both the novelist and the director were trying to create a scene that was very poetic/artsy, even surreal, but it didn't really do it for me. Perhaps I would need to see it again to see if there is something I missed? The end, well...I was a little disappointed with the end also. Far too easy of an ending, as if the novelist or director got "lazy" and "just wanted to finish". Still, it was a great story, I really did enjoy it. Even the narration through about half the film, it tied things together and you were able to see things from Jean Baptist's perspective. Well worth watching, I highly recommend it and you will not be disappointed. See it yourself to believe it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars HEAVEN 's SENT?, August 12, 2007
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an ABSOLUTELY BRILLIANT movie ~ Ben Wishaw as our hapless hero[?] reminds strongly of Tony Perkins and Tom Courtnay, but what a delightful and subtle performance! Inspiration dabs of Tony Perkins [as Norman 'u know who'with that killer smile] and Jerry Lewis [the gait!] [This boy is literally rail-thin - without being emaciated - defining Spartan life as luxurious when we discover his circumstances].

The look, texture, feel and humor of the film [although in English] is essentially French, and what a period of devine filth - one can only but imagine the stench of the big cities during summer, although Veni .... [another story]

The girls have their special glow - especially the first accidental 'apricot' seller victim and the final fatal attraction.

We're not quite sure why the Academy chose to overlook this exquisite film, but then again the subject matter might have left the members somewhat stunned? Whislaw has our votes as Best Actor, followed by Hoffman and Rickman as supporting. yet very pivotal characters.

Wave upon wave of brilliant images flow over the audience, the editing, art direction, costumes, lighting - everything meshes and comes together.
This concept is so picture perfect one would expect Valmont to walk into the perfumarie, as well as characters from all the recent period movies as well as Mozart or at least Salieri [snooping for ungents].

*Hoffman is delightful as the eccentric master perfumer living in his 'lively' little maison on the bridge - fairietailish in concept vs. Alan Rickman's chateau on Grasse [which brings new meaning to the hidden dangers of a maze .... or a contemporary mall .... during rush hour .... or a crowded birthday party ...]

*[Wouldn't it be incredible to see him as Tartuffe on film? What a delicious sense of comedy this actor has].

ALAN RICKMAN is always brilliant in his creations, this is an intelligent and also tortured character. Rickman never disappoints - is always spot on with his unique choices.

It's a very seductive movie ..... and quite imformative about the 'perfume industry' - worth more than just a sniff.

...by the way ...... another taste-treat would be the big screen version of "THE COOK" [no, not the other one about "The Cook, The Wife ...etc." - this was once filmed as "Something for Evebody" - was it? Didn't quite work..]
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perfume smells good., August 8, 2007
I was enthralled when I first saw the preview, the idea of a serial killer killing women for their scent was fascinating - albeit this was before I found out it was based on a book. It's always interesting when a bad guy is actually the protagonist.

Tom Twyker shot this beautifully, with amazing shots and scenery, without too much pizzazz or speed which we saw in Run Lola Run, since as a life story it had to be told as a story of someone's life, which shouldn't be rushed. I was enthralled on how he captured the essence of smell in each shot, and actually made you think that each smell and each breath had a distinct feeling.

What really amazed me was when I found out that Twyker actually composed the music to this movie. He actually wrote the music and played it while they were shooting, and this really captured a specific mood and feeling for each scene - I know how hard it is to direct, but to write the music as well? Seriously.

All in all it was a great experience from front to back. Dustin Hoffman was a bad casting choice - in my opinion he sucked ever since he participated in the heretical "The Messenger", but other than that, it was a solid, great movie, shot masterfully by Twyker, of whom I am now a huge fan.

Just the fact that Kubrick deemed it unfilmable, and how Twyker made it possible, was amazing. Kubrick couldn't see it but we now can thanks to Twyker. Next stop: I'm going to read the book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Wonderful Sent., August 4, 2007
The sense of smell has never be so compelling and so wonderfully put on film then it has in "Perfume - Story of a Murderer".

The movie takes place in Paris 300 years ago and tells the story of Jean-Baptiste Grenouille, played by Ben Whishaw, who is an orphan with the best sense of smell in the world.

Jean's goal in life is to make a perfume that captures the esseance of smell and never goes faint, a perfume so potent that people loose track of all reality. Jean's life gets twisted and darkened has he looks and searches for the sents needed to complet is masterpice and what's portrayed is a man's spiral in a hateful but unknowing place.

Perfume wraps yourself with its world and its personlity so effectivley, that the ending will slap you in the face. The preformaces of Jean-Baptiste Grenouille by Ben Whishaw is a wonder to watch...you see a little Hannibl Lector in him.

The DVD does the story justice and I can't give it enough praise without sounding like a rambling idiot anymore. For a uniniqe vewing experince everyone must check this movie out.
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Perfume - The Story Of A Murderer (Blu-Ray)
Perfume - The Story Of A Murderer (Blu-Ray) by Tom Tykwer (Blu-ray - 2007)
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