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Personal Finance in Your 20s For Dummies Paperback – January 7, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 264 pages
  • Publisher: John Wiley & Sons; 1 edition (January 7, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 047076905X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0470769058
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (44 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #85,271 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

The easy way to begin on the road to financial success

When it comes to protecting your financial future, starting sooner rather than later is the smartest thing you can do. This hands-on, friendly guide provides you with the targeted financial advice you need to establish firm financial footing in your 20s and to secure your finances for years to come.

  • Conduct a financial check-up — ensure you're ready to make important decisions for your unique financial situation, like choosing the right type of bank account and setting a budget to save, pay bills, and reduce debt

  • Be street wise — get expert guidance on how to make it in the real world of credit reports and credit scores, identity theft, housing commitments, merging finances with a partner, and more

  • Make your job work for you — get smart about your job's income-earning potential and the benefits of investing in a long-term career

  • Protect yourself — get the 4-1-1 on health insurance, disability coverage, life insurance, and auto insurance — and how to get the best deal on each

Open the book and find:

  • How to save, budget, and spend money wisely

  • Ways to improve your credit score

  • Tactics to change spending when unemployed

  • Tips to keep in mind when hiring financial professionals

  • Proven strategies to make wise investments

  • Ten things to value more than your money

Learn to:

  • Budget and develop a savings program

  • Establish a firm financial footing whether you're in school or a post-graduate

  • Manage loans and debt

  • Make informed investment strategies

About the Author

Eric Tyson is an internationally acclaimed and bestselling personal finance author and speaker who operates one of the Web's most popular personal finance sites at www.erictyson.com. He has worked with and taught people from all financial situations, so he knows the financial concerns and questions of real folks. Despite having an MBA from the Stanford Graduate School of Business and a BS in economics and biology from Yale University, Eric remains a master of "keeping it simple."
He figured out how to pursue his dream after working as a management consultant to Fortune 500 financial-service firms. Eric took his inside knowledge of the banking, investment, and insurance industries and committed himself to making personal financial management accessible to all.
He is the author of five national bestselling financial books in Wiley Publishing's For Dummies series, including books on personal finance, investing, mutual funds, home buying (coauthor), and real estate investing (coauthor). His Personal Finance For Dummies won the Benjamin Franklin Award for best business book of the year. An accomplished personal finance writer, his "Investors' Guide" syndicated column, distributed by King Features, is read by millions nationally, and he was an award-winning columnist for the San Francisco Examiner.
Eric's work has been featured and quoted in hundreds of local and national publications, including Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune, Forbes, Kiplinger's Personal Finance, Parenting, Money, Family Money, and Bottom Line/Personal; on NBC's Today Show, ABC, CNBC, PBS's Nightly Business Report, CNN, and FOX; and on CBS national radio, NPR's Marketplace Money, Bloomberg Business Radio, and the Business Radio Network.

More About the Author

Eric Tyson is a best-selling personal finance book author and has penned five national best sellers. He is also the only author to have four of his books simultaneously on Business Week's business book bestseller list.

His Personal Finance for Dummies, a Wall Street Journal best-seller, won the Benjamin Franklin Award for Best Business Book of the Year. Eric's syndicated newspaper column is read by millions of readers weekly. He is a former columnist and award-winning journalist for the Sunday San Francisco Chronicle. His website, www.erictyson.com, rocketed into the top one percent of financial websites within its first year of operation.

Eric's work has been featured and quoted in hundreds of local and national publications and media outlets including Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune, Forbes, Kiplinger's Personal Finance Magazine, Money, Worth, Parenting, USA Today and on the NBC Today Show, ABC, Fox News, CNBC, PBS Nightly Business Report, CNN, and on CBS national radio, NPR's Marketplace Money and Bloomberg Business Radio. He's also been a featured speaker at a White House conference on retirement planning.

Tired of working as a management consultant to Fortune 500 financial service firms which more interested in maximizing short-term profits than in providing sound financial products and services, Eric founded in 1990 the nation's first financial counseling firm which works exclusively on an hourly basis. He started his new company with a simple mission: to provide objective, cost-effective personal financial advice, especially to non-wealthy Americans. Through family and friends, Eric had seen many otherwise intelligent people make horrendous mistakes in managing their money, in part, because the failure of our schools and colleges to teach personal finance.

In addition to his counseling work, Eric also hoped to make an impact in the writing and media fields. Much of the personal finance writing and reporting he saw and heard was biased, jargon-laden and, in some cases, filled with bad advice. For example, rather than telling people the hard truth - that one must live within one's means as a prerequisite to building wealth - many publications offer up hyped and unrealistic "get rich without making sacrifices or taking risk" type approaches.

In addition to his writing and counseling, Eric also taught the nation's most highly attended personal financial management course at the University of California. He has spoken at many corporations and non-profits. His educational background includes having earned his bachelor's degree in economics at Yale and an MBA at the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

Eric is the only best-selling personal finance author who has an extensive background as an hourly-based financial planner and who does not accept speaking fees, endorsement deals or fees of any type from companies in the financial services industry or product or service providers recommended in his articles, books and his publications.

Customer Reviews

Thus, we checked out this book.
L. J. Schrader
Read this book and now you can spend all of your time worrying about the other 25% of stuff causing stress!
Lawrence Holtzman
I read through it and found a lot of good information.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Lucy Cat VINE VOICE on March 13, 2011
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Author Eric Tyson has a knack for making Personal Finance clear and coherent for any reader. With "Personal Finance in Your 20s" he speaks specifically to young adults--some of the most financially undereducated people in America.

Who should read this book?

1- Students who have just graduated high school and are transitioning to a limited-income college life (whether on their own income, their parents, student loans or grants).

2- Students who have just graduated college, have landed their first "real job" and want to know how to be smart with their money and start investing.

3- Young adults and late teens who want to gain control of their financial lives and play it smart from the start.

4- Really... just anyone! Its never too late or early to gain a solid understanding of personal finance.

For such a small book, the author packs in an immense amount of relevant and useful information--with just the right level of detail. And, at 233 pages (this book is smaller than typical dummies books-- roughly the dimensions of a standard trade paperback), its not too lengthy to discourage reluctant readers. So, what does this book cover?

1- Learn what "net worth" means and distinguish between assets and liabilities

2- Deciding how to save, how much to save and what your savings are *really* worth

3- Understanding what your credit score is, how it changes and what is is used for. Also covered are: how to obtain your actual, free credit score (not how to get scammed) and how to appeal and correct errors and injustices related to your credit score.

4- Choosing a bank, a checking and savings account and understanding alternatives such as money market and brokerage accounts.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By L. J. Schrader on June 15, 2011
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
My daughter recently graduated from college and has her first "real" job, including something new to her; a 401k plan. She has come to us looking for good advice on how to understand that plan, how to choose the best insurance plan offered by her employer, the best route for paying back student loans, covering her expenses, living on her own, and finally investment strategies if she has anything left to work with. As her parents, we have given her the benefit of our knowledge on these matters (as well as mistakes we have learned from) but I wondered if there was more than an "expert" could provide to her. Thus, we checked out this book.

As the back of the book states "When it comes to protecting your financial future, starting sooner rather than later is the smartest thing you can do". This seems like a daunting task, until you recognize that all the stepping stones to get starting doing so are in this relatively small book. It's extremely reader-friendly and simply points out the things all young people should consider for financial well being.

This guide includes things that the average high-schooler and college age student really should know before heading out on their own, including:

Choosing the right type of bank accounts, creating a budget, paying bills, reducing (or better yet, avoiding) debt, making good decisions on housing, choosing the right types of insurance, and spending (and saving) wisely.

While these topics are not all fully discussed at length, the author does give just enough information to get the process going without being overwhelming. Anything that is not covered in the book in great detail can be expanded upon, but the basics are certainly explored.
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27 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Eli on June 22, 2012
Format: Paperback
THE PROS (such as they are):

As a crash course in personal finance, this book is passable. The structure is sensible, so it's easy to find what you're looking for and skip what you don't need. I didn't find the tone dry or dull -- a little patronizing, sure, but not soporific.

The advice in the initial chapters is pretty rudimentary -- pay your credit card bill in full every month, compare fees before opening a bank account, etc. I'd hope that most people know these things by the time they hit their 20s and enter the job market, but for a sophisticated high schooler or a financially dense college student, this is a decent breakdown of how to not screw up your finances before you've even gotten started.

The sections about more complicated matters (buying a house, investing, retirement accounts) are clear but cursory and generally conclude by suggesting one of the author's other books. People who are seriously concerned about these things, rather than remotely curious, aren't likely to find this book helpful.

THE BIG CON:

Here's the catch: considering that this book is geared specifically toward people in their 20s, Eric Tyson seems woefully ignorant of his audience.
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