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6 Reviews
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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must read!!!!
This was the first book I ever read on my own, cover to cover. It changed my entire philosophy about life. Of course, I was 18 and hadn't yet established a concrete philosophy to begin with, but I went on to read other Leo Buscaglia books and from there I built my foundation. I suggest this book for everyone but especially for those entering into adulthood with no clue...
Published on October 4, 1997 by Frieden1@juno.com

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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars good advice on the art of living
I rated this book three stars only because I wonder how effective it would be to someone who isn't already headed in the direction of living artfully. This book has a bit of the "preaching to the converted" about it, which doesn't detract from its value, but I believe any one who would pick up a book sub-titled "The Art of Being Fully Human" is...
Published on February 19, 2004 by L. Rephann


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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must read!!!!, October 4, 1997
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This review is from: Personhood: The Art of Being Fully Human (Paperback)
This was the first book I ever read on my own, cover to cover. It changed my entire philosophy about life. Of course, I was 18 and hadn't yet established a concrete philosophy to begin with, but I went on to read other Leo Buscaglia books and from there I built my foundation. I suggest this book for everyone but especially for those entering into adulthood with no clue where to begin.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars good advice on the art of living, February 19, 2004
By 
L. Rephann "curious about everything" (Brooklyn, New York United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Personhood: The Art of Being Fully Human (Paperback)
I rated this book three stars only because I wonder how effective it would be to someone who isn't already headed in the direction of living artfully. This book has a bit of the "preaching to the converted" about it, which doesn't detract from its value, but I believe any one who would pick up a book sub-titled "The Art of Being Fully Human" is probably already quite concerned with the topics touched on in this book (spirituality, the role of death, intimacy and connectedness, etc.), and is probably on the path of being "fully human."
Each chapter is like a meditation on the topic by Buscaglia. The chapters are short and have some wise and lovely details. The insights he makes feel familiar, and I wasn't as challenged as I'd expected to be. Nevertheless, this book helped me feel better about where I am in life, and reinforced my beliefs that I've come to have about what it is to "live artfully."
These days, a lot of "personal growth" literature is more acquisitive and seems to focus on personal growth as a means to an end rather than for the betterment of global society. "Personhood" thus feels like a relic in some ways, of the personal growth/spirituality movements of the 70s, where personal growth and global awareness were connected ideals. This idea is retained in "Personhood" and is perhaps the book's greatest asset.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Buscaglia Had Courage, May 9, 2004
This review is from: Personhood: The Art of Being Fully Human (Paperback)
Leo had the courage to look at the world how it could be instead of the way it is, one relationship at a time. I'm sure many people told him he was a "kook" because he always had his head in the clouds. He also showed us the way, a kinder and gentler way. He wasn't afraid to ask the questions, when many in conventional religion are sure they have all the answers.
Jeffrey McAndrew
author of "Our Brown-Eyed Boy"
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars learned to be me, February 12, 2013
This review is from: Personhood: The Art of Being Fully Human (Paperback)
I read all of these books when I was a young man in my 20's(I am now 57), when I had a lot of questions about self-worth, my direction in life and my station in life. These books helped me to establish a courage to be ME despite what other's might think, to appreciate the qualities that I own, characteristics that I have, to appreciate my OWN UNIQUE EXISTENCE(there is only one ME!). Now with the existence of so much bullying of our kids(and adults) and suicides of young adults, everyone should read this. If you read one, you will read them all!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Full Functioning, January 5, 2013
This review is from: Personhood: The Art of Being Fully Human (Paperback)
This book's thesis is that each stage of life has its Fully Functioning characteristics which the author concisely describes. He also includes extremely short summaries of the 7 leading religions of our time. The descriptions IMHO leave quite a bit to be desired with much more said about Judaism and Christianity than about Buddhism for example (which I found a bit misleading having read a ton of Tibetan Buddhism works and taken college courses in comparative religion). If you are unfamiliar with Abraham Maslow's works (e.g. Toward A Psychology of Being-Reprint of 1962 Edition First Edition), Dr. Buscaglia's expositions on Personhood may be enlightening, otherwise they're a bit elementary--until one gets to the end of the book (almost 75% through it). Then it starts to get interesting--with some pithy statements such as:

p. 99: Embrace death as simply another aspect of the life cycle...death is the greatest of life's teachers. It is only the ignorant and those who are afraid to live who fear it.
p. 113: Fully functioning persons are aware of the pitfalls of communication and therefore do not take it casually. They listen to the words they speak and those spoken to them. [continues onto p. 114] They attempt to find the most exact and least threatening word for communicating themselves. They strive to put those words into the most succinct context so they can be assured of as little misunderstanding as possible. They often paraphrase what they think they have heard or encourage the listener to rephrase what they have said, so that they can have feedback as reinforcement of attention. [the playback is called active listening in Management]
p. 115: Sensitive and intelligent people are always full of doubt. They see it as a positive influence for spontaneity and continued growth.
p. 116: We can only be certain about uncertainty.
p. 119: Because something can be explained need not affect its wonder!
p. 121: Spirituality involves an awareness of all there is and an openness to what is not.
p. 123: No one & nothing can depress us or cause us [emotional] pain if we choose not to have it so.
pp. 124 & 126: When we cling to pain we end up punishing ourselves.

So, for me there wasn't a lot that's new in this tiny volume--except the basic thesis itself, but the author writes beautifully and points out some very important observations that are not generally known (let alone practiced) among the population. I plan to send this book to my brother to read.
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4 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Insight on His Perspective, September 4, 2003
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This review is from: Personhood: The Art of Being Fully Human (Paperback)
As I mentioned in a review of another Buscaglia book I feel like I need to preface my comments with saying as a Christian I am in disagreement with a Buddhist such as Buscaglia on religion. With that statement made I can say he has some insight in this book that causes one to take a fresh perspective. For example, he writes "I learned to feel passionately and express it without shame. I learned to laugh. I learned to see. I learned to care." He goes on to describe his passion for living. Relationships are important to him and he makes the point that a life of zest includes the cultivation of relationships. In some places he irritates me by the statements he makes on religion with which I strongly disagree. In other places he makes valid, perceptive points such as his statement "each of our acts makes a statement as to our purpose." I would recommend this book with caution. Ignore his religious sermonizing and take only the portions on living with passion.
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Personhood: The Art of Being Fully Human
Personhood: The Art of Being Fully Human by Leo F. Buscaglia (Paperback - April 12, 1986)
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