Digital List Price: $19.99
Kindle Price: $7.99

Save $12.00 (60%)

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Flip to back Flip to front
Audible Narration Playing... Paused   You are listening to a sample of the Audible narration for this Kindle book.
Learn more

Perspectives on the Ending of Mark Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
$7.99

Length: 160 pages

What Every Christian Needs to Know About the Jewishness of Jesus
What Every Christian Needs to Know About the Jewishness of Jesus
Rabbi Evan Moffic serves as a tour guide to give Christians a new way to look at familiar teachings and practices that are rooted in the Jewish faith. Paperback | Kindle book

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.


Editorial Reviews

About the Author

David Alan Black is professor of New Testament and Greek at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary in Wake Forest, North Carolina. He has published more than one hundred scholarly articles, authored or edited twenty books, and lectured abroad in Spain, Romania, and England. Black and his wife live in southern Virginia.

Product Details

  • File Size: 981 KB
  • Print Length: 160 pages
  • Publisher: B&H Academic (November 1, 2008)
  • Publication Date: November 1, 2008
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004OR17WK
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #414,761 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I am preaching through the gospel of Mark. From the outset, I knew I had to decide how I was going to approach the last 12 verses. In the past, the question of when does Mark's Gospel end would not have been a problem. Preaching from the King James to people reading the King James doesn't necessitate an explanation. Other than that part about handling snakes I mean. And drinking poison (Mark 16:18). Besides, I could just camp on Mark 16:15 and be done with it. That was then. This is now. I preach from the NASB. My folks carry a variety of translations. The NIV makes a clear distinction separating vs. 8 from vss. 9-20. Most of the others simply use brackets with a footnote. In preparation I read this book edited by David Alan Black, who also served as one of the contributors.

Let's start with the issue at hand. "Since the two most reliable early manuscripts do not have Mark 16:9-20" (as per the NIV) are the last 12 verses of the gospel of Mark authentic? Does Mark end his gospel at verse 8, as all the modern translations seem to suggest or did he end at verse 20, the so-called long ending (LE), as the majority of manuscripts do? I assumed it was an either or question, who knew there were four possible views! The book did a very good job of differentiating between them.

2 views that say Yes, the long ending is the right ending

Maurice Robinson is Senior Professor of New Testament at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary and the author of The New Testament in the Original Greek. He argues that Mark 16:9-20 is original. His is the traditional view that there is not enough evidence to the contrary to doubt the authenticity of the LE. You would think that his presentation would be the most easy to defend, given that his is the position with the most history behind it.
Read more ›
2 Comments 15 of 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Individually, I would rate the essays as follows. My overall ranking is based on an average of these:
Wallace: Five stars (*****)
Robinson: Three stars (***)
Elliott: Three stars (***)
Black: One star (*)

Wallace made the best case for his position, by far. He is strong not only in his handling of the evidence, but also in his careful identification of the presuppositions inherent in the debate. He raised several important points I had not previously considered and also introduced pieces of evidence that the other contributors seemed unaware of.

Robinson makes a few good points. He draws a number of interesting literary parallels, but most of the ones I actually checked by looking them up in my Bible seem much less convincing than he makes them out to be. The essay is marred heavily by the fact that all the subject headings are taken from Marianne Moore's poem, "Poetry," producing an essay that appears to be organized in an entirely nonsensical manner. His use of this poem as an analogy for different versions of Mark is especially unconvincing.

Elliott makes some interesting points about internal evidence as well, and in some ways he is almost a foil to Robinson's essay. However, he is far too dismissive of external testimony. He also proposes a theory that Mark is "damaged at both ends" which I find to be implausible in light of the dearth of textual evidence for this position. The essay's main redeeming quality is the discussion of canonicity at the end of it.

Black's essay is easily the worst. I have enjoyed reading some of Black's material in the past, and I was hoping to read some actual evidence for 16:9-20 as a Markan addition.
Read more ›
1 Comment 17 of 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you would like to get current on the state of scholarship on the long ending of Mark, this is the introduction you want. Highly readable, this volume does not bolster your presuppositions, but alerts you to the important arguments on all sides of the debate regarding Mark's long ending (and the intermediate ending). This book is a great introduction for those just jumping into the debate and a good review and update for those who have previously studied the textual issue of Mark's long ending.
Comment 10 of 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Perspectives on the Ending of Mark: 4 views. Edited by David Alan Black. Nashville, TN: B&H Academics, 2008. 145 pp. $19.99. ISBN 978-080544762-0.

Biblical apologetics could be described as the act of giving a defense of the Christian scriptures. In order to give a reasoned critique of the Christian scriptures one needs to understand the methods, issues, and arguments surrounding the study of the biblical manuscripts, both interior and exterior critiques. One of the most important issues for the defense of the canonical Gospels is the question of the ending of the Gospel of Mark. Most textual issues have to do with word variation, or the occasional phrase, but with the Gospel of Mark we are dealing with textual variants which bring into question the entire ending of Marks Gospel (16:9-20). Of course the amount of reading that would be necessary to understand the issues is enormous, that it is important for anyone who wishes to begin researching these subjects to have access to a good introductory text which not only articulates the main difficulties, but also provides the necessary references that the interested researcher can use to further pursue his studies. This is why multiple view books, in general, are so important. This book review will be considering Perspectives on the Ending of Mark: 4 Views. Due to the nature of multiple views books I will not be able to interact with the arguments that are proposed by the individual authors. This review will begin be explaining the purpose of this book, and continue by providing an overview of the authors who collaborated in this book, their respective positions and the relative use of this book.

This book is the product of a conference that was held at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary in 2007.
Read more ›
Comment 4 of 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?